National Infertility Month

The National Infertility Association founded National Infertility Week, which is observed each year to increase public understanding and awareness of the reproductive disease. People who are trying to conceive are encouraged to learn the guidelines for seeing an infertility specialist.

Infertility is more common than many realize. It is estimated that 1 in 8 couples have trouble getting pregnant or sustaining a pregnancy. Infertility affects both men and women equally.

There are several factors that can contribute to infertility. In men some of these are:

  • Problems with the delivery of sperm
  • Exposure to toxic chemicals
  • Damage resulting from chemotherapy or radiation
  • Abnormalities in the production of sperm
  • Use of tobacco or alcohol

Some causes of infertility in women may be the result of:

  • Hormonal abnormalities
  • Ovulation disorders
  • Damage to reproductive organs
  • Uterine or cervical abnormalities
  • Use of tobacco or alcohol

Although these conditions can impair a person’s ability to conceive, seeking medical assistance as soon as possible can greatly increase their chances of conception.  A physician who specializes in infertility will conduct several tests to determine probable causes and explore several treatment options. Treatment can be surgical or medicinal and may include:

  • Intrauterine insemination
  • In vitro fertilization
  • Clomiphene citrate (Clomid)
  • Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (Gn-RH)
  • Human menopausal gonadotropin or hMG
  • Follicle-stimulating hormone or FSH
  • Metformin
  • Bromocriptine
  • Sperm extraction

While coping with infertility can be challenging, it is important for individuals to remember not to blame themselves, lean on their partner or loved ones for support, acknowledge stress and practice stress-reducing techniques, gain knowledge by utilizing resources.

At Jamaica Hospital, we are dedicated to helping patients find ways to achieve pregnancy. We provide consultations for all female infertility problems. Our team of experts is prepared to treat infertility and assist you in your journey towards pregnancy.

If you are experiencing difficulty getting pregnant, it is recommended you seek a medical consultation. If you would like to make an appointment with with a medical professional at the Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Infertility team , please call 718-291-3276.

For more information about this observance, please visit http://www.resolve.org/national-infertility-awareness-week/home-page.html

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Tips for Pumping and Storing Breast Milk

There are several reasons why mothers may want to pump and store breast milk for their babies.  For some, they are returning to the workplace, for others pumping and storing milk simply offers convenience and flexibility for their busy schedules. In certain cases, pumping and storing milk helps to address supply problems. Lastly, this method can provide opportunities for dads and other family members to bond with babies by participating in feedings.

Whatever one’s reasons are for pumping and storing milk, it is important to know the fundamentals of properly and safely doing so. 

Here are a few tips to consider when pumping milk:

  • Always start by washing your hands
  • Ensure that the tools you are using to pump milk are clean to avoid the risk of bacterial contamination
  • Consider pumping in the morning, many moms produce the most milk during this time of day
  • Massage areas of your breasts that feel firm before pumping, doing so can help improve the letdown of milk
  • Relax and make yourself comfortable, stress can hinder letdown
  • Use hospital-grade breast pumps if you are not expressing milk manually
  • Keep a consistent schedule. Pump at the same times every day.  (If returning to work it is best to express your milk during the same time you would normally feed your baby. Inform your employer about the importance of keeping this schedule- exercise your pumping rights).

When storing breast milk, it is advised that you follow these tips:

  • Store breast milk in clean containers designed specifically for this purpose
  • Do not store breast milk beyond the recommended or optimal time for safe storage (It is important to note that storage guidelines may differ for premature infants)
    Room temperature (The medical definition of room temperature is a temperature of from 59° to 77°F (15° to 25°C) – no more than four hours
    Refrigerator– up to 3 days
    Freezer-up to 6 months
  • Label each container with the date that you expressed milk
  • When thawing frozen milk, it is best to do so overnight in the refrigerator or by holding the container under warm, running water.
  • Do not defrost frozen milk in the microwave, doing so can damage the composition of breast milk

Jamaica Hospital Medical Center is a designated Baby-Friendly USA facility that promotes breastfeeding. Our hospital provides several social and clinical programs designed to support pregnant and nursing mothers.   Some of our programs include breastfeeding education classes, CenteringPregnancy and breastfeeding support groups.  To learn more about our breastfeeding initiatives, please visit https://jamaicahospital.org/clinical-services/ob-gyn/baby-friendly/

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Stress Awareness Week

In 1992, the month of April was designated as Stress Awareness Month.  During this time, health professionals join together to increase the public’s awareness about what causes stress and what can help cure the growing stress epidemic.

Jamaica Hospital Medical Center is participating by reaching out to our social media community and sharing some helpful techniques that can assist you in managing your daily stress, such as:

  • Meditation – is helpful to the brain’s neural pathways, making you more resilient to stress
  • Breathing Deeply – triggers our parasympathetic nervous system, neutralizes stress and elicits a calming feeling
  • Exercise – all forms of exercise can ease depression and anxiety by helping the brain releasing feel-good chemicals giving your body a chance to practice dealing with stress
  • Eating Healthy – choosing a diet rich in vegetables, fruits, and fiber may reduce the chance that stress can boost the body’s natural defense system

Prolonged, excesive periods of stress is unhealthy for any individual. A change of mindset can bring about a healthier lifestyle.  That positive change can help you manage stress and bring far-reaching improvement to your health and well being.

For more information and to find out ways you can make a difference visit – http://stressawarenessmonth.com/

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Oral, Head and Neck Cancer Awareness Week

April 11-16 is Oral, Head and Neck Cancer Awareness Week. Jamaica Hospital’s Ear, Nose and Throat (ENT) Department is joining the Head and Neck Cancer Alliance and the American Academy of Otolaryngology in spreading awareness.

DYK that in the U.S., a new head and neck cancer case is diagnosed every 10 minutes and a person dies from this disease every 45 minutes?

Symptoms of head and neck cancer include:

  • Change in the voice
  • A growth in the mouth
  • A lump in the neck
  • Problems with swallowing
  • Bringing up blood
  • Persistent earaches
  • Changes in the skin

Early diagnosis is key to the successful treatment of these types of cancers. To schedule an appointment with an ENT specialist at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-7110.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

A Covid-19 Vaccine Myth

There are many myths being spread about the COVID-19 vaccines and this is causing some people to be hesitant about getting it. The vaccines currently being administered within the United States have been proven to be safe.

One myth is that the vaccines are made with egg-based products and people who are allergic to eggs may have a reaction. It should be clear that neither the Pfizer/BioNTech nor the Moderna COVID vaccines are made with egg-based products.

Even though these vaccines are not made with egg-based products, those who have a history of allergic reactions to vaccines should still mention this before receiving the vaccine. All patients, regardless of their history of allergic reactions should be monitored for 30 minutes after receiving the vaccine.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Facts About Aspirin Therapy

Daily aspirin therapy is sometimes recommended for people who are at risk for heart attacks or diagnosed with certain heart diseases. While this form of therapy is effective, it may not be the right form of treatment for everyone.

Taking occasional doses of aspirin is typically safe; however, daily use can lead to serious side effects.  This is why it is highly advised that you speak with your doctor to determine if this approach is best for you. Serious side effects of aspirin can include:

  • Gastrointestinal bleeding
  • A stroke resulting from a burst blood vessel
  • Allergic reactions

Recommendations for daily aspirin use may vary from person-to-person. Your doctor may recommend this regimen if you have:

  • Coronary artery disease or atherosclerosis
  • Had a heart attack
  • Had a transient ischemic attack or stroke
  • Had bypass surgery or a stent placement procedure

Your doctor may not recommend daily aspirin therapy if you:

  • Have a bleeding or clotting disorder
  • Have bleeding stomach ulcers
  • Have an aspirin intolerance
  • Drink alcohol regularly
  • Are undergoing certain medical or dental procedures

If you are considering daily aspirin therapy, you must consult your physician before you begin.  You should inform your doctor about any health conditions or risks you may have that will increase the chances of complications.  Provide a list of medications that you are taking, as some may contribute to drug interactions and adverse effects.  Based on the current condition of your health, your doctor will advise you as to whether or not daily aspirin therapy is right for you.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

#WorkoutWednesday – Running Do’s and Don’t’s

It is no secret that exercise does wonders for your health.  Running, in particular, offers many benefits, and is known to improve your mental and physical wellbeing.

In a study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, it was found that” five to 10 minutes a day of low-intensity running is enough to extend life by several years.” Similar studies have also indicated that running can help reduce the risks associated with obesity, diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure and some cancers.

Given the benefits, your doctor may recommend that you include running as part of your exercise regimen. If you decide to run, there are a few things you should keep in mind in order to prevent injury and optimize your workout. Here are some running dos and don’ts:

The Do’s:

  • Keep your head up -This will keep your body in alignment and prevent injuries
  • Stretch and warm up-This reduces muscle tightness and increases your range of motion
  • Start slowly -Starting off too fast can lead to overexertion which may result in side aches
  • Schedule rest days –Allow your body days to recover and reduce the risk of exhaustion
  • Remain hydrated- Drinking enough water will prevent dehydration

The Don’ts:

  • Do not run in shoes that are worn or not intended for running- Shoes that are worn or not designed for running may lack support and lead to injuries
  • If running outdoors, do not run with headphones – It is important to be aware of your surroundings and avoid hazards
  • Do not eat big meals before running-Eating too much can slow you down
  • Do not ignore injuries- It is important that you rest if you are injured, not doing so can lead to complications

The most important thing to consider before starting your running routine is to speak with your doctor. Experts recommend that you receive a full medical checkup if you are over the age of 40, have preexisting medical conditions, are obese or have a family history of heart disease.  Your doctor will be able to assess your health and determine if running is best for you.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Autism Acceptance Month

Autism or autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is characterized by a range of conditions that can significantly impair behavioral, communication and social skills.

Autism -624530410There are three different types of autism spectrum disorders; they include Classic Autism, Asperger Syndrome and Pervasive Developmental Disorder. Each condition differs by the severity of symptoms.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) children or adults with ASD may display the following symptoms:

  • Having delays in speech and language skills
  • Not responding to their name by 12 months
  • Avoiding eye contact or wanting to be alone
  • Having difficulty understanding the feelings of others
  • Displaying unusual reactions to the way things look, feel, sound or smell
  • Repeating actions over and over
  • Not looking at objects when other people point to them
  • Repeating words or phrases in place of normal language
  • Preferring not to be cuddled or cuddling only when desired
  • Having trouble adapting to changes in daily activities
  • Displaying behaviors such as flapping hands, spinning in circles or rocking the body

The most obvious symptoms of ASD typically emerge between two to three years of age. However, in some cases, they can be identified earlier.

There are no definitive causes of ASD but it has been discovered that there are several factors that can make a child more likely to have the disorder.  The CDC asserts the following findings:

  • Most scientists agree that genes are one of the risk factors that can make a person more likely to develop ASD.
  • Children who have a sibling with ASD are at a higher risk of also having ASD.
  • ASD tends to occur more often in people who have certain genetic or chromosomal conditions, such as fragile X syndrome or tuberous sclerosis.
  • There is some evidence that the critical period for developing ASD occurs before, during, and immediately after birth.
  • Children born to older parents are at greater risk for having ASD.

Diagnosing ASD can be difficult as assessments are primarily based on behavior and development. There are two stages of diagnosis, the developmental screening and the comprehensive diagnostic evaluation.

Currently, there is no cure for ASD but research shows that early intervention services and treatment can improve development in children.

April is National Autism Acceptance Month, during this time, Jamaica Hospital Medical Center hopes to promote autism awareness and acceptance through education.  The hospital proudly supports the nationwide goal of building a greater understanding and acceptance of ASD.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Irritable Bowel Syndrome Awareness Month

April is Irritable Bowel Syndrome Awareness Month (IBS). This is a condition that affects the large intestine resulting in the following symptoms:

  • Bloating
  • Gas
  • Nausea
  • Abdominal cramps
  • Diarrhea or constipation

There is no general rule of what to eat and what to avoid in treating IBS. A physician will go through a patient’s daily diet and see if there are certain foods that are more likely to act as triggers. The foods that physicians who treat this disease may recommend avoiding include:

  • Wheat
  • Carbonated Drinks
  • Dairy products
  • Beans
  • Cabbage

Some of these symptoms can be relieved by modifying the diet as well as taking certain medications.

The classifications of medications include:

Antibiotics

Anti-diarrheal agents

Anti-spasmodics

Prescription laxatives

Prescription pain medications

If you are experiencing recurring intestinal distress and would like to speak with a physician at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Varicose Veins

According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, approximately half of Americans age 50 and older have varicose veins.  These veins appear to bulge from the skin and are dark purple or blue in color. They are most commonly located in the legs and are caused by the pooling of blood in enlarged veins.

While varicose veins are very common among both men and women, there are several factors that can increase a person’s risk of being affected. This includes:

  • Heredity
  • Hormonal changes, such as puberty, pregnancy, and menopause
  • Increasing age
  • Obesity
  • Sun exposure

The Dangers of Varicose Veins
Not only can varicose veins cause discomfort and embarrassment for the men and women who have them, but they can also sometimes lead to more serious health conditions. If left untreated, varicose veins can lead to:

  • Blood Clots- Blood clots are extremely dangerous, as they may dislodge from the vein and travel to the lungs or heart, preventing either from functioning properly.
  • Sores and Ulcers- Varicose veins may lead to sores and ulcers of the skin because of long-term buildup of fluid.

Varicose veins may also cause ongoing swelling, rashes, and pain, and can increase a person’s chances of infection.

Seeking Medical Attention
Varicose veins may signal a higher risk for circulatory problems. If you have varicose veins that cause pain, swelling, itching, tiredness, or numbness in the legs, you should seek medical attention. Jamaica Hospital offers a variety of options to treat varicose veins.

If you have varicose veins and would like to schedule a consultation with a vascular surgeon at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s, Ambulatory Care Center please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.