Signs of Poor-Quality Sleep

Sleep quality is defined by the National Sleep Foundation as, “the measurement of how well you’re sleeping—in other words, whether your sleep is restful and restorative.”

Getting adequate amounts of quality sleep is essential for our health.  It allows our bodies to recharge and provides additional benefits including:

  • Improving memory and concentration
  • Strengthening the immune system
  • Reducing stress
  • Lowering the risk of chronic health conditions such as heart disease and diabetes

Consequently, not getting enough quality sleep can have a negative effect on our health.   A lack of quality sleep can result in:

  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Insomnia and other sleep disorders
  • Increased stress
  • An increased risk of developing health conditions such as diabetes
  • An increased risk of developing mental health issues such as anxiety and depression

Thankfully, our body tells us when we are depriving ourselves of quality sleep so that we can make improvements.  Signs of poor-quality sleep include:

  • Taking 30 minutes or more to fall asleep
  • Feeling sleepy or tired, even after getting enough sleep
  • Waking up often throughout the night and lying awake for several minutes
  • Having trouble concentrating during the day
  • Experiencing hunger more often
  • Experiencing symptoms of a sleep disorder such as snoring or gasping for air
  • Having dark circles or bags under the eyes

Improving sleep quality can be achieved by making simple changes to our lifestyles. Here are a few recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC):

  • Be consistent. Go to bed at the same time each night and get up at the same time each morning, including on the weekends.
  • Make sure your bedroom is quiet, dark, relaxing, and at a comfortable temperature.
  • Remove electronic devices such as TVs, computers, and phones from the bedroom.
  • Avoid large meals, caffeine, and alcohol before bedtime.
  • Don’t use tobacco.
  • Get some exercise. Being physically active during the day can help you fall asleep more easily at night.

If you are having difficulty falling and staying asleep for an extended period, speak with your doctor to explore possible causes.   Your physician may recommend that you see a sleep specialist who can diagnose and treat a variety of sleep disorders.

To schedule an appointment with a sleep specialist at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

A Healthy Holiday Eggplant Ricotta Bites Recipe

It is the holiday season, a time of year when people tend to do eat special treats. Whether you are having company at your home or will be visiting others in theirs, this recipe from the Food Network for eggplant ricotta bites  will definitely put a smile on people’s faces.

https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/food-network-kitchen/eggplant-ricotta-bites-recipe-1973666

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

What is Pediatric Diabetes?

Approximately 10% of all Americans have diabetes, with an increasing number of these cases occurring in children and teenagers under the age of 20. Diabetes that occurs within this age range (referred to as pediatric diabetes) usually presents as type 1 diabetes, which causes the body to stop producing insulin. However, type 2 diabetes, which causes insufficient insulin production and causes cells to absorb less sugar from the bloodstream, has begun to account for more of these cases over time.

According to Dr. Hariram Ganesh, a pediatric endocrinologist at Forest Hills Pediatrics, increasing rates of obesity and economic factors are largely to blame for the increased prevalence of pediatric type 2 diabetes.

“Rising obesity rates have caused rates of type 1 and type 2 diabetes in children to even out,” said Dr. Ganesh. “Junk food is much cheaper and more accessible than healthy options. Many families would rather spend a dollar on fast food than 60 dollars on something healthy at the grocery store. “

Children with prediabetes may exhibit certain signs, such as excessive thirst and the frequency with which they need to use the bathroom. Additionally, black marks may occur around the neck, armpits, groin, or other parts of the body due to abnormally high insulin levels. Some other signs you may notice include:

  • Yellow, brown, or red patches of skin
  • Hardened or thickened skin on the fingers or toes
  • Blisters (in rare cases)
  • Skin infections or rashes

If you notice any of these signs, you should bring your child to your primary physician as soon as possible. They can help determine whether your child’s symptoms warrant a referral to an endocrinologist or are indicative of a less severe problem.

While neither type 1 nor type 2 diabetes has a cure, both are treatable. For children with type 2 diabetes, an initial plan of three to six months of dietary changes and exercise coupled with medication may help manage the condition. In cases of type 1 diabetes, however, treatment options are more limited.

“Type 1 primarily involves insulin dependence and cannot be managed with diet and exercise alone,” said Dr. Ganesh. “Even if a child loses weight, they’ll continue to need insulin. Otherwise, they may end up in the hospital.”

Still, Dr. Ganesh emphasizes the importance of diet and exercise, regardless of any diabetes diagnoses your child may or may not have received.

“Diabetes is just one problem among many related to childhood obesity, and in many cases, a diagnosis may only be a matter of time. Parents should make a point to emphasize a healthy diet and physical activity for their children, whether that involves playing with them or finding a local place for them to regularly participate in physical recreation,” said Dr. Ganesh.

If your child is exhibiting signs that may be indicative of prediabetes, schedule an appointment at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center now by calling (718) 206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Toxic Shock Syndrome

Toxic shock syndrome (TSS) is a rare but potentially life-threatening condition caused by harmful toxins produced by staphylococcus or streptococcus bacteria. The bacteria Clostridium sordellii may also cause TSS; however, occurrences are less common.

Staphylococcus, streptococcus, and Clostridium sordellii bacteria typically live in our nose and mouth, and on our skin without causing harm. However, when they enter the body through cuts in the skin or small tears in the vagina, they can get into the bloodstream and spread to vital organs, causing severe damage and illness.

Although toxic shock syndrome is commonly associated with women who use tampons, especially the super-absorbent types, it can affect anyone including men and children.  The risk factors for developing TSS include:

  • Using super-absorbent tampons for longer than the recommended use
  • Using menstrual cups, diaphragms, or contraceptive sponges
  • Recent childbirth, miscarriage, or abortion
  • Having had recent surgery
  • Having any type of staph infection
  • Having cuts or burns on the skin

The signs and symptoms of toxic shock syndrome vary and may include:

  • Fever
  • Rash
  • Bright red eyes, lips, and tongue
  • Low blood pressure
  • Headaches
  • Confusion
  • Muscle aches
  • Vomiting or diarrhea
  • Dizziness
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Seizures

If you are at risk of developing TSS and are experiencing any of these symptoms, please see a doctor or go to your nearest emergency department right away.  If left untreated, toxic shock syndrome can result in amputations or even death.

Treatment for TSS is dependent on severity and other factors such as your age and medical history. Treatment may include wound cleaning, antibiotics,  intravenous (IV) medications to treat shock or prevent organ damage, heart medications, supplemental oxygen, or dialysis.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

3 Diet Tips for Healthy Holiday Eating

The holidays can be a challenging time, especially when you’re trying to lose weight or have a condition such as diabetes that requires you to stick to specific dietary guidelines.

Many celebrations with family and friends include plenty of indulgent meals and treats that can potentially set your weight loss goals back, or otherwise negatively impact your health.

Although holiday gatherings may present certain challenges, there is no need to stress yourself out about sticking to your diet. A few key guidelines that emphasize moderation and patience can help you navigate your way through this part of the year in a way that preserves your health and allows you to focus on enjoying your time with your loved ones. These include:

Arriving with (and sticking to) a plan: Before your holiday gathering begins, determine ahead of time how much food you intend to eat. This may vary depending on your individual dietary restrictions and weight goals; if possible, find out what kind of food is being prepared ahead of time. If a particular option would be ideal for you, make it known to the hosts of the gathering ahead of time or prepare it yourself. Once you’ve determined the types and amounts of food you plan to eat, stick to that plan throughout the day.

Drink plenty of water: You will find your food to be much more filling when you drink lots of water. Try to drink roughly one glass of water each hour; you may find this easier by drinking one cup of water before your meal, one cup during the meal, and one cup afterward.

Talk to your loved ones: Remember that the main point of your holiday gathering is to spend time with the people you love and enjoy their company. Instead of absent-mindedly picking at hors d’oeuvres, focus on having conversations with the people around you and participating in the moment.

If you struggle to manage your diet during the holidays or any other part of the year, a nutritionist at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center may be able to help. To schedule an appointment, please call (718) 206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Jamaica Hospital Opens New, State-Of-The-Art Pediatric Eye Center

Earlier today, Jamaica Hospital Medical Center hosted a ribbon-cutting ceremony to celebrate the opening of its new pediatric ophthalmology center. Construction of the state-of-the-art facility and the purchase of equipment was made possible thanks to a generous donation of $1 million from Maspeth Federal Savings, one of New York City’s strongest community banks.

Maspeth Federal Savings has been working with Jamaica Hospital throughout the pandemic and has provided mission-critical equipment and supporting donations. Today, the organization is the sole donor to the pediatric ophthalmology center, which addresses an urgent need in the local area.

“As a community bank, it’s incredibly important to us that the people and facilities in our community have the resources they need to do what they do best; in this case, providing care that our children desperately need,” said Thomas Rudzewick, President and CEO of Maspeth Federal Savings.

Jamaica Hospital provides quality healthcare to an underserved community, including much-needed vision services to children who have limited access to comprehensive ophthalmologic care. By creating a dedicated ophthalmology center for children, the hospital aims to address the lack of access to care and other healthcare disparities that impact its community.

The need for a comprehensive pediatric ophthalmology service is reflected in current statistics. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that one in four preschool-aged children and approximately 6.8% of children younger than 18 years of age in the United States has undiagnosed or untreated vision problems. These numbers are amplified in communities that encounter disparities in receiving optimal healthcare. Children who reside in underserved communities are found to be at nearly twice the risk for developing eye disorders compared to children living in neighborhoods that are supplied with sufficient health services.

The Maspeth Federal Savings Pediatric Ophthalmology Center at Jamaica Hospital will be the only one of its kind to service Queens. “We are bringing a world-class, state-of-the-art center to Queens. Residents who live in our community no longer have to travel outside their local area to receive high-quality pediatric eye care. Our center is staffed by physicians who are among the best in their specialty and are highly skilled in performing a wide range of services to diagnose and treat pediatric ocular conditions,” said Bruce J. Flanz, Jamaica Hospital’s President and CEO.

“We are thrilled to have a center of excellence in pediatric ophthalmology in Queens County. This center will allow us to provide cutting-edge technology and treatment to our youngest patients,” shared Dr. Julia Shulman, Chairperson of Ophthalmology at Jamaica Hospital. The newly constructed 2900 square foot center consists of a modernly designed area waiting area, four spacious examination rooms, two testing rooms, three consultation offices, and two charting workstations. Each room is equipped with amenities to provide a comfortable environment for children.

“Our community needed a facility like this in Queens for a very long time. When our board member Dr. Cono Grasso came to us and explained the importance of the center, we immediately made it a priority,” stated Mr. Rudzewick of Maspeth Federal Savings.

“Jamaica Hospital is grateful to Maspeth Federal Savings for their generous donation to our pediatric ophthalmology center. Their philanthrophy and commitment to helping our communities thrive has helped our hospital make critical advancements that will greatly benefit our growing patient population,” said Mr. Flanz.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

3 Tips for Managing Holiday Stress

The holiday season is a stressful time for many people for a variety of reasons. For some it might be the pressure of buying gifts or the burden of hosting, while others might have concerns about the financial strain associated with the holidays.

No matter your situation, it’s important not to let the natural stressors that accompany the holidays ruin the season for you. Most factors that lead to stress during the holidays are manageable through the application of mindfulness techniques and an active effort to remember the things that matter most: showing love and appreciation to the people around you and making happy memories with those people.

Some tips for maintaining this perspective and preserving the positive energy of the holiday season for yourself and your family include:

Reminding yourself that your efforts are good enough: Strict expectations to find the perfect gift, make your home look perfect before guests arrive, or to cook the perfect holiday dinner may prevent you from enjoying any of these activities (or their results). Remind yourself that there is no need for perfection in any of these areas and that what matters most is doing the best you can to ensure that your loved ones have the opportunity to enjoy the holiday season with you.

Releasing yourself from the expectations and opinions of other people: For many people, the thoughts and expectations of others may cause as much pressure (or more) as their own. However, you cannot control how the people around you view you or your efforts. Instead, resolve to be kind to those around you, regardless of their stated opinions, and make a conscious choice to only hold yourself to your own expectations.

Planning goals instead of making resolutions: As the New Year approaches, people often set “New Year’s resolutions” for themselves that, while indicative of goals they may truly care about, often die out within weeks. An approach that is more likely to succeed involves making a detailed, step-by-step plan for achieving the goal you have in mind, starting small and making incremental progress forward on a set timeline.

If your holiday stress is causing (or stems from) mental health problems, you can schedule an appointment with a psychiatrist at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Mental Health Clinic by calling (718) 206-5575.

If you are experiencing a mental health emergency such as suicidal contemplation, please call the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s confidential, 24/7 National Help Line at 1-800-662-4357.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Avoiding the Flu During the Holiday Season

Throughout the holiday season, flu cases tend to reach their peak; many respiratory viruses have an easier time surviving in the cold than in the warm weather of other seasons. Holiday gatherings also often provide ideal circumstances for these viruses to spread.

Fortunately, there are a few ways for you and your family members to protect yourselves against the flu and prevent as few people from getting sick as possible, allowing everyone to enjoy holiday celebrations in good health. Some preventative steps you can take include:

Getting vaccinated: The simplest, most effective step you can take toward preventing the spread of the flu is to make sure you’re up to date on your influenza vaccinations. Anyone over the age of six months should get vaccinated annually.

Wash your hands regularly: Another simple method of protecting against the flu is to practice effective hand hygiene through regular, consistent handwashing. You should generally wash your hands after using the bathroom, after touching surfaces used by other people or animals, before and after preparing food, and before and after coming into direct contact with another person or animal. If you cannot wash your hands, use hand sanitizer containing at least 60% alcohol.

Practice healthy lifestyle habits: Regular exercise and a balanced, nutritious diet are effective for keeping your body at a well-protected baseline level against many diseases and conditions, including the flu. Include regular aerobic exercise in your routine several times per week and make sure you’re getting at least seven hours of sleep each night.

You should also make sure to visit a doctor as soon as you begin to feel symptoms of a respiratory infection, including a sore throat, difficulty breathing or wheezing, congestion, or coughing. You can schedule an appointment at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center by calling (718) 206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

What is a Blood Clot ?

A blood clot is the body’s way of preventing excess bleeding when a blood vessel is damaged. Clots are made up of cells in the blood called platelets combined with proteins found in the plasma. However, under normal circumstances the clot will dissolve naturally after the blood vessel heals. A blood clot can become dangerous when it forms without an injury to a blood vessel, and if it fails to dissolve naturally.

Blood clots can form in either the arteries or veins. When they form in veins, blood flow back to the heart is restricted. This can cause swelling and pain in the area where the clot has formed. When a blood clot forms in an artery, it will deprive vital organs of oxygen needed to function properly. In some cases this can lead to a heart attack or a stroke.

Risk factors for developing a clot include:

  • Smoking
  • Taking oral contraceptives
  • Trauma
  • Obesity
  • Diabetes
  • High blood pressure
  • Prolonged inactivity
  • Pregnancy
  • Family history
  • History of cancer
  • Age 65 or older
  • Bone fracture

The symptoms of a blood clot vary depending on the part of the body that is affected. Symptoms can include weakness in arms, legs, face, dizziness, shortness of breath, sharp chest pain, sweating, nausea, blurry vison and coughing up blood.

Treatment of a blood clot is dependent on where the clot is located. Some clots can be treated with blood thinners while others may require surgical intervention.

If you are experiencing any of the signs and symptoms of a blood clot, it is important that you seek immediate medical attention. You should call your physician or call 9-1-1 and go to the nearest emergency room to be evaluated.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

National Handwashing Awareness Week

A wide variety of viral illnesses, including respiratory, diarrheal, and gastrointestinal diseases, frequently spread through direct contact via the hands. People use their hands to touch a multitude of surfaces countless times throughout each day, allowing germs to spread easily.

Regular handwashing offers the simplest solution to reducing your risk of illness and restricting the spread of germs among your friends, family, and community. Handwashing with soap removes germs effectively, preventing a substantial percentage of respiratory and gastrointestinal illnesses when done correctly. Less people getting sick also reduces the need for antibiotics in many cases, reducing viruses’ resistance to these medications.

Washing your hands is typically most effective at key moments, such as after using the bathroom or changing a diaper, or immediately after you’ve touched a point of infection such as food (cooked or raw), garbage, physical wounds, mucus, or a sick person. You should never touch your eyes, nose, mouth, or food without washing your hands with soap first.

Handwashing is most effective as a preventative measure against disease when it’s performed correctly. You should lather the front and back of your hands, as well as between the fingers and under the nails, using soap and water, scrubbing them for 20 seconds before rinsing and drying them with a tower or air dryer.

Although hand sanitizer can also effectively remove many germs and is acceptable when handwashing is not possible, it does not remove as many germs or chemicals from your hands as washing with soap and water, and is therefore not ideal. When you use sanitizer, make sure it contains at least 60% alcohol.

If you’re sick with a viral infection, you can schedule an appointment with a doctor at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center by calling (718) 206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.