The Importance of Sleep in Children

According to a recent report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), more than one-third of children (4 months- 17 years) living in the United States, get less sleep than what is recommended for their ages.

The American Academy of Sleep Medicine recommends:

• Infants 4 months to 12 months should sleep 12 to 16 hours per 24 hours

• Children 1 to 2 years of age should sleep 11 to 14 hours per 24 hours

• Children 3 to 5 years of age should sleep 10 to 13 hours per 24 hours

• Children 6 to 12 years of age should sleep 9 to 12 hours per 24 hours

• Teenagers 13 to 18 years of age should sleep 8 to 10 hours per 24 hours

A lack of sleep can affect children in several ways. Children who do not receive adequate sleep are at a higher risk for developing health conditions such as type 2 diabetes, poor mental health, and obesity.  Sleep deprivation can also contribute to the development of behavioral or academic problems.

There are several ways parents can help children achieve a good night’s sleep. This includes:

  • Turning off devices at least an hour before bedtime
  • Ensuring beds are comfortable
  • Creating a consistent bedtime routine (changing into pajamas, brushing teeth, etc.)
  • Establishing and keeping a consistent sleep schedule (This includes weekends and vacations)
  • Keeping children from going to bed hungry or too full
  • Avoiding scary movies, books or television shows before bed
  • Helping to alleviate bedtime fears or anxieties by talking about them and providing comfort

It is important that children receive adequate sleep as it is beneficial for their overall health and development. If your child is consistently having problems falling or staying asleep despite practicing healthy sleep hygiene, you should consult a doctor.

To schedule an appointment with a sleep specialist at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-5916.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Patient Story: What Started Out As a Mild Headache Quickly Turned Into A Medical Emergency.

While going about his usual routine on a warm summer day, Norbert Silva began to experience a mild headache.  As the day progressed, his symptoms grew more severe.  Hoping desperately to find some relief, Mr. Silva decided to take a few painkillers but still, the pain intensified.

Shortly after, Mr. Silva began to vomit. His body was warning him that something was terribly wrong. He immediately went to a local hospital to seek medical attention.

Following a thorough examination, it was decided by doctors to transfer Mr. Silva to Jamaica Hospital Medical Center to further investigate a suspected tumor. “I remember feeling nervous, everything was happening so fast,” shared Mr. Silva.

Upon his arrival at Jamaica Hospital, the E.R. team worked quickly to conduct a series of diagnostic tests. It was discovered that Mr. Silva developed a large tumor in the brain which was compressing his optic and oculomotor nerves.  “Throughout this process, the staff made it a priority to keep me informed and as comfortable as they could,” said Mr. Silva.

Shortly after this discovery was made, Mr. Silva realized that his vision was becoming blurry, he was rapidly losing the ability to see and move his right eye. “I was scared but all I could think about was my family. Thinking of them helped me to build up my courage,” he said.  

Neurosurgeon Dr. Amrit Chiluwal was consulted to further assess Mr. Silva’s condition and it was determined that surgery should be performed right away. “Dr. Chiluwal visited me and explained why I needed surgery and what to expect. I felt confident that he would take good care of me,” said Mr. Silva.

Mr. Silva’s surgery was performed by Dr. Chiluwal and fellow neurosurgeons Dr. Shamik Chakraborty and Dr. Mohsen Nouri.  The operation was successful thanks to the physicians’ expert training. “Our goal was the remove the tumor from the brain and decompress the nerves safely and in the least invasive manner possible,” shared Dr. Chiluwal. “Within 24 hours after surgery the patient’s vision was back to normal and he was able to move his right eye normally.”

Mr. Silva had a positive recovery in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). He said, “Everyone involved in my care treated me well.  The nurses in the ICU were amazing.  Dr. Chiluwal came to see me in the day and night. He’s a nice guy, a great doctor.”

Mr. Silva was released from the hospital just in time to celebrate his birthday. “I thank Dr. Chiluwal and the entire team for giving me the opportunity to celebrate another year of my life. I got to go home and see my family,” shared Mr. Silva,

Today, life is back to normal for Mr. Silva. He reports that his vision is now better than it was before and that he cherishes each day. His advice to others is to listen to their bodies and “don’t delay going to the E.R. if something does not feel right.”

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Jamaica Hospital Welcomes Dr. Hala Ubaid.

Hala Ubaid DO

Jamaica Hospital would like to introduce our community to Obstetrician and Gynecologist Dr. Hala Ubaid.

Dr. Ubaid was born and raised in New York.  She is fluent in three languages: Urdu, Hindi, and English.

Dr. Ubaid earned her bachelor’s degree from the New York Institute of Technology, then went on to complete her medical education at the New York College of Osteopathic Medicine. She graduated with honors from both programs.

Dr. Ubaid performed at the top of her class and gained extensive experience serving a diverse population during her residency training at Nassau University Medical Center. She is board certified by the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

Dr. Ubaid is highly trained in performing a wide range of obstetrical and gynecological procedures including general gynecologic surgery.

Before joining Jamaica Hospital six months ago, Dr. Ubaid worked at a private practice for several years. “I have always wanted to work in a team setting in which I could mentor medical residents and care for a community that was underserved. I am able to do these things and more at Jamaica Hospital. I’m happy to be a part of this team,” she shared.

Having lived in Queens and with family members currently residing in the borough, giving back to the community is very important to Dr. Ubaid.  Building trust among her patients is equally as important.  Dr. Ubaid believes that one of the best ways to foster relationships with the women and families she cares for is to be sensitive to their cultural needs. “I aim to meet the unique needs of each of my patients. It is my goal to provide them with quality healthcare throughout all stages of life,” she said.

To make an appointment with Dr. Ubaid, please call Jamaica Hospital’s Women’s Health Center at 718-291-3276.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Restless Legs Syndrome

Restless legs syndrome diagnosis

Restless legs syndrome (RLS) or Willis-Ekbom disease is a common disorder that causes what is often described as tingling, pulling, throbbing, itching, burning, aching or crawling sensations in the legs. These sensations result in an uncontrollable urge to move your legs.  

RLS can also occur in other parts of the body such as the arms or torso; however, these instances are less common.

Anyone can be at risk for developing RLS.  According to the Sleep Foundation, “RLS affects 5 to 10% of adults and 2 to 4% of children in the U.S. and it is found in women more often than men. People of all ages can develop RLS, but the most severe symptoms tend to occur in older adults.”

Symptoms of restless legs syndrome can include:

  • An irresistible urge to move the legs or arms
  • Discomfort in the legs or arms
  • Trouble staying asleep due to the urge to move your limbs
  • Periodic limb movement or leg twitching while you sleep
  • Daytime sleepiness due to sleep disruption

These symptoms most commonly occur in the late afternoon or evening hours and may increase in severity at night. They can also happen when you remain inactive or seated for extended periods. Symptoms typically go away in the morning.

Although the exact cause of restless legs syndrome is unknown, it is believed that genetics and environmental factors play a significant role.  RLS is often associated with other medical conditions such as:

  • Iron deficiency
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Late-stage kidney disease
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Peripheral neuropathy

RLS may also occur temporarily during pregnancy with most women developing the disorder during their third trimester.

Some medications such as anti-depressants, anti-nausea, and allergy drugs can contribute to the development of RLS.

A diagnosis for restless legs syndrome is determined after your medical and family history is assessed, a complete physical and neurological exam is conducted, and blood tests are ordered to rule out other possible conditions. Your doctor may also refer you to a sleep specialist for an evaluation.

Currently, there is no cure for restless legs syndrome.  However, there are treatments available to manage symptoms.  Your doctor may include the following treatments or therapies in your care plan: exercise, massages,  foot wraps, stress reduction, iron supplementation or prescription medications.

To schedule an appointment with a doctor at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Pericarditis

There are several reasons why chest pain should never be ignored, pericarditis is one of them.

Pericarditis is the swelling and inflammation of the pericardium- the thin, saclike tissue that surrounds the heart. Pericarditis can affect people of all ages, but men ages 16 to 65 are more likely to develop it.

The causes of pericarditis can include:

  • An infection
  • A heart attack
  • Systemic inflammatory disorders such as lupus or rheumatoid arthritis
  • Trauma
  • Certain medications
  • Health disorders such as AIDS, kidney failure, cancer, or tuberculosis

Sharp or stabbing chest pain is the most common symptom of pericarditis; however, other signs and symptoms may also occur.  They include:

  • Coughing
  • A low-grade fever
  • Abdominal or leg swelling
  • Heart palpitations
  • Shortness of breath

According to the American Heart Association, “Pericarditis can be acute, meaning it happens suddenly and typically doesn’t last long. Or the condition may be “chronic,” meaning that it develops over time and may take longer to treat. Both types of pericarditis can disrupt your heart’s normal function. In rare cases, pericarditis can have very serious consequences, possibly leading to abnormal heart rhythm and death.”

Pericarditis is usually mild and may clear up with rest or simple treatments.  Treatment in more severe cases can include medications or surgery.

If you are experiencing chest pains, it is important that you see a doctor right away. Early diagnosis and treatment can help to reduce the risk of complications caused by pericarditis.

To schedule an appointment with a cardiologist at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-7100.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Tips for Pumping and Storing Breast Milk

There are several reasons why mothers may want to pump and store breast milk for their babies.  For some, they are returning to the workplace, for others pumping and storing milk simply offers convenience and flexibility for their busy schedules. In certain cases, pumping and storing milk helps to address supply problems. Lastly, this method can provide opportunities for dads and other family members to bond with babies by participating in feedings.

Whatever one’s reasons are for pumping and storing milk, it is important to know the fundamentals of properly and safely doing so. 

Here are a few tips to consider when pumping milk:

  • Always start by washing your hands
  • Ensure that the tools you are using to pump milk are clean to avoid the risk of bacterial contamination
  • Consider pumping in the morning, many moms produce the most milk during this time of day
  • Massage areas of your breasts that feel firm before pumping, doing so can help improve the letdown of milk
  • Relax and make yourself comfortable, stress can hinder letdown
  • Use hospital-grade breast pumps if you are not expressing milk manually
  • Keep a consistent schedule. Pump at the same times every day.  (If returning to work it is best to express your milk during the same time you would normally feed your baby. Inform your employer about the importance of keeping this schedule- exercise your pumping rights).

When storing breast milk, it is advised that you follow these tips:

  • Store breast milk in clean containers designed specifically for this purpose
  • Do not store breast milk beyond the recommended or optimal time for safe storage (It is important to note that storage guidelines may differ for premature infants)
    Room temperature (The medical definition of room temperature is a temperature of from 59° to 77°F (15° to 25°C) – no more than four hours
    Refrigerator– up to 3 days
    Freezer-up to 6 months
  • Label each container with the date that you expressed milk
  • When thawing frozen milk, it is best to do so overnight in the refrigerator or by holding the container under warm, running water.
  • Do not defrost frozen milk in the microwave, doing so can damage the composition of breast milk

Jamaica Hospital Medical Center is a designated Baby-Friendly USA facility that promotes breastfeeding. Our hospital provides several social and clinical programs designed to support pregnant and nursing mothers.   Some of our programs include breastfeeding education classes, CenteringPregnancy and breastfeeding support groups.  To learn more about our breastfeeding initiatives, please visit https://jamaicahospital.org/clinical-services/ob-gyn/baby-friendly/

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Autism Acceptance Month

Autism or autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is characterized by a range of conditions that can significantly impair behavioral, communication and social skills.

Autism -624530410There are three different types of autism spectrum disorders; they include Classic Autism, Asperger Syndrome and Pervasive Developmental Disorder. Each condition differs by the severity of symptoms.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) children or adults with ASD may display the following symptoms:

  • Having delays in speech and language skills
  • Not responding to their name by 12 months
  • Avoiding eye contact or wanting to be alone
  • Having difficulty understanding the feelings of others
  • Displaying unusual reactions to the way things look, feel, sound or smell
  • Repeating actions over and over
  • Not looking at objects when other people point to them
  • Repeating words or phrases in place of normal language
  • Preferring not to be cuddled or cuddling only when desired
  • Having trouble adapting to changes in daily activities
  • Displaying behaviors such as flapping hands, spinning in circles or rocking the body

The most obvious symptoms of ASD typically emerge between two to three years of age. However, in some cases, they can be identified earlier.

There are no definitive causes of ASD but it has been discovered that there are several factors that can make a child more likely to have the disorder.  The CDC asserts the following findings:

  • Most scientists agree that genes are one of the risk factors that can make a person more likely to develop ASD.
  • Children who have a sibling with ASD are at a higher risk of also having ASD.
  • ASD tends to occur more often in people who have certain genetic or chromosomal conditions, such as fragile X syndrome or tuberous sclerosis.
  • There is some evidence that the critical period for developing ASD occurs before, during, and immediately after birth.
  • Children born to older parents are at greater risk for having ASD.

Diagnosing ASD can be difficult as assessments are primarily based on behavior and development. There are two stages of diagnosis, the developmental screening and the comprehensive diagnostic evaluation.

Currently, there is no cure for ASD but research shows that early intervention services and treatment can improve development in children.

April is National Autism Acceptance Month, during this time, Jamaica Hospital Medical Center hopes to promote autism awareness and acceptance through education.  The hospital proudly supports the nationwide goal of building a greater understanding and acceptance of ASD.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Understanding Virus Mutation

A virus is a submicroscopic parasite that is made up of genetic code: RNA or DNA, surrounded by a protective protein coat known as a capsid.

 A virus’ purpose is to create more copies of itself and spread to hosts.  However, viruses lack the ability to thrive and reproduce outside of a host body. In other words, “A virus cannot replicate alone. Viruses must infect cells and use components of the host cell to make copies of themselves. Often, they kill the host cell in the process, and cause damage to the host organism,” according to the National Human Genome Research Institute.

When a virus replicates, its genes may undergo copying errors or genetic mutations. This is a natural and normal occurrence and is especially true of viruses that contain RNA such as the coronavirus.

Over time, alterations to the virus’ surface proteins or antigens can occur through mutation. This leads to the formation of new variants of a virus strain.

It has been reported that multiple variants of the virus that causes COVID-19 are circulating.   The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) states, “Information about the characteristics of these variants is rapidly emerging. Scientists are working to learn more about how easily they spread, whether they could cause more severe illness, and whether currently authorized vaccines will protect people against them.”

The CDC is closely monitoring these variants of concern and advises people to continue to protect themselves from COVID-19 by practicing good hand hygiene, wearing a mask, social distancing and getting vaccinated.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Ayshea Beswick-Bailey Shares Her “Jamaica Journey”

Thousands of people work at Jamaica Hospital and each has their own unique story to tell about their career path.  The following is one of them.

Ayshea Beswick-Bailey RN, MSN, PMHNP; Clinical Nurse Manager for Psych-3, began her career journey at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center 17 years ago.

Driven by a strong desire to care for others, Ayshea pursued a career in nursing “I always knew I wanted to be a nurse. As a child I enjoyed helping people and was intrigued by anything related to medicine,” she shared.

In 2003, she joined Jamaica Hospital as a Licensed Practical Nurse on 3-North. After receiving her Bachelor of Science in Nursing from Lehman College, Ayshea honed her clinical expertise by working in various areas of the hospital as a Float Team RN.  Her next career stop was the E.R., where she worked for almost 10 years.  For Ayshea, working in the E.R. was one of her best experiences.  She said there is no limit to what you can learn there.

Ayshea used the knowledge and experience she gained in the E.R. to transition to the Psychiatry department. While working as a Staff Nurse, Ayshea completed the Master of Science program at Hunter College and received her degree as a Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner.

Throughout her journey at Jamaica Hospital, Ayshea has become known by many for her strong work ethic and willingness to go above and beyond. In fact, she was nominated for a G.E.M award which is given to employees who go the extra mile to help patients and colleagues.

In addition to her commitment to providing excellent care to patients, Ayshea credits her professional growth to the support of her mentors and colleagues.  “My first mentor at Jamaica hospital was Linda Hayes, the Assistant Director of Nursing Administration. She always pushed me and believed in me,” she stated. “I am also very grateful that other leaders such as Marge Lilienthal, Liz Garcia, Dr. Daniel Chen, Dr. Martha Edelman and Dr. Meri Nisimova gave me a chance.”

When asked about her overall experience of working at Jamaica Hospital, Ayshea replied, “I know this may sound cliché, but it is the truth, working at Jamaica Hospital has truly been like working with family. My colleagues have been there during the difficult and best times in my life, including my dad’s cancer diagnosis and recovery, as well as the birth of my kids, two of which I had at this hospital.”

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Jamaica Hospital Offers A Virtual Prenatal Experience For Women

Being pregnant can be very challenging, and even more so during the COVID-19 pandemic. One of the issues that a growing number of pregnant women are encountering at this time is loneliness.

Studies show that over 50% of expecting mothers admit to feeling extremely lonely and isolated because they are spending more time at home, and away from others.  These factors are believed to be contributors to a rise in prenatal depression.

Jamaica Hospital Medical Center hopes to provide a solution to this problem by offering pregnant women a safe place where they feel supported. By moving its CenteringPregnancy program to a virtual space, patients of the hospital can receive prenatal care and actively engage with a community of healthcare providers and fellow moms on Zoom.

In the CenteringPregnancy program at Jamaica Hospital, patients with similar due dates are invited to participate in group sessions facilitated by doctors or midwives.  Participants meet every two or four weeks (depending on gestational age) and interact with nutritionists, lactation consultants and other healthcare providers.  A variety of topics including mental health, breastfeeding and labor preparation are discussed. Special guest speakers from organizations such as Safe Sleep and Queens Healthy Start are also invited to share information and connect moms to helpful resources.

Before their first group session, patients attend an in-person orientation where they are given a Centering prenatal kit. This consists of a scale, blood pressure monitor, fetal Doppler, books and other materials, all of which are needed to participate in the program.  Participants are trained on how to use each item to monitor their baby’s development and record vital health information.  Patients report this information to their providers in a private session before the start of every group meeting.

While engagement and group discussions are encouraged among participants, there are 1-on-1, break-away sessions during each meeting. Here, mothers can speak privately with facilitators about any concerns or questions they may have. If a patient’s needs cannot be addressed via Zoom, an appointment will be scheduled to see their doctor at the Women’s Health Center where strict COVID-19 safety protocols are followed.

Jamaica Hospital’s virtual CenteringPregnancy program has been highly successful. The program has earned recognition from leading institutions and is used to demonstrate the benefits of virtual prenatal care to other medical facilities.  

“The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the pregnancy experience for a lot of women, and we are constantly thinking of ways to make it as positive as we can,” said Patricia Fox, Certified Midwife.  “Our team has established this unique, virtual platform so that we can provide our patients with a healthcare service that is convenient, safe and supportive. We understand how important these things are during these unprecedented times,” shared Thalita Viruet, Practice Manager for the Women’s Health Center.

To learn more about Centering at Jamaica Hospital, please call our Women’s Health Department at 718-291-3276.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.