What is Eclampsia?

Eclampsia is a condition that causes seizures during pregnancy. It is a rare complication in people with preeclampsia, which causes high blood pressure and protein in urine during pregnancy. Eclampsia generally occurs after the 20th week of pregnancy and requires emergency medical care.

Aside from seizures, people with eclampsia may also experience severe distress, confusion, or loss of consciousness. Before the onset of these symptoms, certain warning signs may occur, such as:

  • Severe headaches
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Distorted vision or loss of vision
  • Swelling of the hands, face, or ankles
  • Difficulty breathing or urinating
  • Abdominal pain, particularly on the upper right side of the abdomen

A few factors may increase a person’s risk of developing eclampsia. These include:

  • A family or personal history of preeclampsia or eclampsia (though most people with preeclampsia do not develop this condition)
  • Being pregnant for the first time
  • Twins or triplets
  • Autoimmune conditions
  • Obesity
  • Diabetes
  • Kidney disease
  • Pregnancy at an age younger than 17 or older than 35

While certain factors that increase your risk of eclampsia may be beyond your control, there are steps you can take to manage many of them. You should attend all of your pre-natal medical appointments and get prompt care from your doctor as needed, particularly if you experience symptoms of preeclampsia. Additionally, maintaining a healthy weight through a balanced, moderate diet and regular exercise can help to control your blood pressure.

If you have been diagnosed with eclampsia, your doctor may suggest inducing labor if the fetus is at 37 weeks gestation or more, as this is the most effective means of treating the condition and protecting the health of yourself and your baby. During pregnancy, you may also be prescribed medication to prevent seizures, lower blood pressure, and strengthen the fetus’ lungs.

You can receive treatment for eclampsia at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Women’s Health Center. To schedule an appointment, please call (718) 291-3276. If you are experiencing a medical emergency, please dial 911 immediately.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Men’s Health Awareness Month

Men face a heightened risk of certain medical problems, such as heart disease, diabetes, and cancer, making certain medical screenings particularly important for identifying these conditions early and treating them effectively.

The types of screenings you require may change or become broader as you age and your health changes. Some of the most important screenings include:

Blood pressure screening: Even if you have no medical history of (or risk factors for) high or low blood pressure, you should receive a screening once every three to five years. However, if you do have a history of abnormal blood pressure, have an immediate family member with high blood pressure, or are Black, you should receive a screening once per year. Other risk factors that warrant an annual blood pressure screening include:

  • Diabetes
  • Heart disease
  • Kidney problems
  • Obesity

Cholesterol screening: If you have no known risk factors for coronary heart disease, men should receive a cholesterol screening every five years starting at the age of 45. Men who do have risk factors for coronary heart disease should receive them starting at the age of 20. If you have abnormally high cholesterol levels, diabetes, heart disease, or kidney problems, you should be screened more frequently.

Diabetes screening: Men without any risk factors for diabetes should receive screenings every three years starting at the age of 35. However, these screenings should begin earlier or be conducted more frequently if you:

  • Have an immediate relative with diabetes
  • Are overweight or obese
  • Have high blood pressure, prediabetes, or a medical history of heart disease

Cancer screenings: According to the National Cancer Institute, prostate, lung, and colorectal cancers accounted for approximately 43% of cancer diagnoses in men; additionally, the mortality rate of cancer is higher among men than women. Some of the most important cancer screenings men should receive include:

  • Prostate cancer
  • Lung cancer
  • Colorectal cancer
  • Bladder cancer
  • Melanoma

Physical exam: Regular general check-ups with your doctor are important, even for men who seem to be in perfect health. These visits can help you identify signs of underlying medical problems or risk factors for future issues.

You can receive all of these medical screenings at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center. To schedule an appointment, please call (718) 206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Important Information About Hypertension

According to the American Heart Association, hypertension is the medical term for high blood pressure.  It is defined an adult as blood pressure that is greater than or equal to 140 mm systolic and 90 mm diastolic. Hypertension directly increases the risk of coronary heart disease and stroke.

When the heart beats, it generates a force exerted against artery walls, known as blood pressure. Blood pressure is measured by testing the force needed to stop blood from flowing through the arteries, away from the heart. When a blood pressure test is performed, a test result will yield two numbers. The first number is known as the systolic number. It measures the pressure when the heart beats. The second number, known as the diastolic number, measures the pressure between heart beats, when the heart is at rest. A normal blood pressure for a healthy adult is 120/80.

Hypertension, also known as high blood pressure, is a serious condition that affects approximately one quarter of all Americans. Hypertension is commonly known as the “silent killer” because of the lack of any noticeable symptoms.  If not treated, hypertension can lead to many more serious conditions that can ultimately prove fatal.

Diagnosing and treating hypertension is very important because it can lead to a number of other diseases, such as heart disease, stroke, and kidney failure.

Everyone is susceptible to developing hypertension, but some groups are at greater risk than others. Those most at risk are:

                • People with a history of hypertension in their family

  • Overweight people

                • African Americans

                • Elderly people

You are also at a higher risk to develop hypertension if you:

                • Smoke

                • Drink alcohol frequently

                • Are pregnant or on birth control pills

                • On a high-salt diet

                • Are an inactive person

If you have hypertension, there are ways of controlling your condition. The following lifestyle changes can be added to reduce your risk:

  • Exercise Regularly – Aerobic exercise for 15 to 45 minutes, three to four times a week, every week is recommended by doctors. Swimming, walking, jogging, riding a bike, and dancing are all excellent forms of aerobic exercise.
  • Eat healthy – Avoid foods with high salt and high fat content. Doctors suggest eating more fruit, vegetables, chicken, fish, pasta, and low-fat dairy products.           
  • Control Alcohol – Limit alcohol consumption. 
  • Stop Smoking – If you are serious about controlling hypertension, you must stop smoking.

In some more serious cases, doctors will prescribe medication to help control hypertension. The best prevention is to see a doctor and have a blood pressure check-up at least once a year.

Before beginning a diet or exercise program, consult your physician.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Hypertension and Kidney Disease

High blood pressure is the second leading cause of kidney failure in the United States after diabetes.

High blood pressure, also known as Hypertension, can damage blood vessels in the kidneys, reducing their ability to work properly. When the force of blood flow is high, blood vessels stretch so blood flows more easily. Eventually, this stretching scars and weakens blood vessels throughout the body, including those in the kidneys.

If the kidneys’ blood vessels are damaged, they may stop removing wastes and extra fluid from the body. Extra fluid in the blood vessels may then raise blood pressure even more, creating a dangerous cycle.

Most people with high blood pressure do not have symptoms. In rare cases, high blood pressure can cause headaches.

Kidney disease also does not have symptoms during its early stages. A person may have swelling called edema, which happens when the kidneys cannot get rid of extra fluid and salt. Edema can occur in the legs, feet, or ankles and less often in the hands or face.

Once kidney function decreases further, symptoms can include:

  • Appetite loss
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Drowsiness or feeling tired
  • Trouble concentrating
  • Sleep problems
  • Increased or decreased urination
  • Generalized itching or numbness
  • Dry skin
  • Headaches
  • Weight loss
  • Darkened skin
  • Muscle cramps
  • Shortness of breath
  • Chest pain

Following a healthy eating plan can help lower blood pressure.  Your health care provider may recommend a dietary approach that includes foods that are low in fat and cholesterol, dairy that is fat-free or low-fat, fish, poultry and nuts, as well as, consuming less read meat, sweets and added sugars.

If  you are experiencing symptoms and would like to speak with a physician, please call Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center at 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Mistakes That Can Affect Your Blood Pressure Reading

Measuring your blood pressure at home is a very important part of properly managing hypertension.  Therefore taking accurate measurements is crucial.

To ensure accuracy, there are several things you should and should not do while measuring, as they can affect your reading.  Here are a few:

  • Always use the bathroom before measuring- Having a full bladder can add points to your reading.
  • Remain quiet- Talking while checking your blood pressure can cause deviations in measurements.
  • While seated make sure your back is supported and both your feet are placed flat on the ground-Measuring blood pressure in a posture where your back or feet are not supported can affect readings.
  • Keep your arm leveled with your heart- If your arm is not on the same level as your heart while getting a reading, you run the risk of getting measurements that are higher than your actual blood pressure level. Always make certain your arm is supported, you can rest it on a chair arm, table or desk to receive the best positioning.
  • Do not place the blood pressure cuff over clothing – Studies show that doing so can have an impact on systolic blood pressure. Your cuff should be placed on your bare arm during measurements.
  • Do not eat or drink anything 30 minutes before taking your blood pressure- Consuming food or drinking beverages within that time can result in a reading that may be inaccurate and high.

Improperly measuring your blood pressure can have serious consequences.  According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), “A reading that underestimates your blood pressure might give you a false sense of security about your health. But a reading that overestimates your blood pressure might lead to treatment you don’t really need.”

In addition to following best practices for an accurate blood pressure reading, it is important that you keep track of your numbers. You can use a notebook, app or chart to do so.  If you are concerned about changes in your blood pressure readings, contact your doctor right away.

To speak with a doctor, or schedule an appointment at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

When Should You Go to The ER For High Blood Pressure?

Complications caused by hypertension (high blood pressure), is one of the most common reasons for emergency room visits.  Elevated blood pressure levels can cause substantial damage to our bodies and lead to conditions that can become life-threatening.

Knowing when to seek immediate emergency care can help you avoid delays in getting medical attention, and decrease your risk of developing severe complications caused by extremely high blood pressure.

According to the American Heart Association, when blood pressure levels increase severely and reach measurements of 180/110 or greater, you should seek immediate medical attention.

There are other warning signs coupled with high blood pressure that indicate you are having a hypertensive crisis and require emergency care. Signs and symptoms may include:

  • Severe chest pain
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Severe headaches accompanied by blurred vision and confusion
  • Seizures
  • Unresponsiveness
  • Shortness of breath
  • Severe anxiety

The cause of a severe spike in your blood pressure and these symptoms could be the result of missing your blood pressure medications, a stroke, a heart attack, kidney failure or an artery rupture.

A hypertensive crisis can lead to complications or damages to your body such as fluid in the lungs, memory loss, vision damage, and damage to vital organs.  This is why it is important that you go to your nearest hospital emergency room and receive the treatment needed to lower your blood pressure.  Damage to your organs will be assessed and your doctors will immediately address complications.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Lamb Kebabs and Lima Bean Salad

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lima beans are a good source of protein, iron, magnesium, potassium and zinc. They can increase energy levels by helping to restore iron and are delicious in soups, stews, salads, casseroles, by themselves or mixed with other vegetables.

Try this easy and delicious Lamb Kebabs and Lima Bean Salad recipe:

INGREDIENTS

  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh oregano
  • 2 cloves garlic, chopped
  • Kosher salt and black pepper
  • 3/2 pound boneless lamb top round steak or shoulder chop, cut into 16 pieces
  • 1 lemon, cut into 8 pieces
  • 1medium red onion, cut into 8 wedges (stem end left intact)
  • 1 pound frozen baby lima beans
  • 1 ounce Feta, crumbled (1/4cup)
  • ¼ cup pitted Kalamata olives, coarsely chopped
  • ¼ cup torn fresh mint leaves

DIRECTIONS

  1. Soak 8 wooden skewers in water for at least 15 minutes. Bring a large saucepan of water to a boil.
  2. Meanwhile, in a medium bowl, make the vinaigrette: whisk together the oil, vinegar, oregano, garlic and ¼ teaspoon each salt and pepper. Transfer half the vinaigrette to another medium brown, add the lamb and toss to coat.
  3. Heat broiler. Thread the lamb, lemon and onion onto the skewers and place on a broiler-proof baking sheet.  Broil 3 to 4 minutes per side for medium-rare.
  4. Add the beans and 1 tablespoon salt to the boiling water and cook until the beans are tender, 2 to 3 minutes. Rinse with cold water, drain well and add to the bowel with the remaining vinaigrette.  Add the Feta, olives and mint and toss to combine.  Serve with the kebabs

Serves:                 4

Total Time:         40 min

For this and other easy recipes visit –

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

National Bike Month – Stay Safe and Fit

National Bike Month begins on May 14th and culminates with Ride to Work Day on May 18, 2018.

Communities nationwide will participate in this week-long recognition good health and bring attention to the need of lessening toxic emissions that motor vehicles are having on our environment.

According to , more than half of all Americans live less than 5 – 10 miles from work. By utilizing the extensive miles of bike lanes to and from your work destination, you could probable arrive at your destination in less than an hour.

Riding a bicycle to work can be a fun and effective way to get fit.  Cycling is beneficial for the cardiovascular system because it increases oxygen intake and stimulates the heart. Studies show that riding can increase energy levels by 20 percent and in one hour burn up to 488 calories when pedaling at 12 to 14 miles per hour.

Although a bicycle is an excellent fitness tool, it is also considered a vehicle.  Therefore, the rules of the road must be obeyed and a bicycle should be operated safely to prevent injuries and accidents. Statistics show that bicyclists face higher risks in crash-related injuries and deaths than drivers in a motor vehicle.

Follow these basic riding tips to ensure your safety and reduce the risks:

  • Always ride in the same direction as traffic and do not weave in between other vehicles.
  • Obey traffic laws and signals.
  • Do not listen to music or speak on cell phones while riding.
  • Wear a proper fitting helmet.
  • Never pass another vehicle on the right.
  • Always keep your hands on the brakes.
  • Stay aware of dangerous road hazards such as potholes and broken glass.
  • Use hand signals to show motorist where you are going.

So suit up, remember to wear your helmet and cycle your way to health and a cleaner environment!

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Is There a Benefit to Wearing a Fitness Tracker?

Generally speaking, if you are inactive your risk of  experiencing obesity, low energy, diabetes and hypertension is higher.  To combat these health issues, you can incorporate a brisk walk or run into your weekly activity.  The addition of this type of movement to your day may prevent or, in some cases, reverse health issues.

One of the ways some are finding it beneficial to keep track of their activity level is by wearing a “fitness tracker.”  Surprisingly, one of the first reports you may receive from your tracker is that you are not as active as you thought you were.

Most fitness trackers are a good way of monitoring your steps, calories, distance travelled, caloric intake, as well as your heart rate and sleep patterns.  They can be viewed as your “conscience” for personal accountability and motivation for a relatively low cost.

Some of the benefits of a fitness tracker include:

  • Encouraging physical activity – If you check your tracker and see that you are behind in your steps for the day, you may “step” up your game a bit and take a walk.
  • Measuring your heart rate – This feature can give you hard data on the effort you exert while doing a particular workout and/or task. It can give you a hint on the condition of your cardiovascular system by allowing you to see just how quickly your heart rate increases.
  • Providing insights on your sleep patterns – Sleep has a definite influence on your overall health. Fitness trackers that log sleep activity can help you address whatever is lacking in your sleep cycles.
  • Encouraging healthy eating – Fitness trackers can come equipped with apps that help you track your food and may help with weight loss.
  • Promoting interaction – Some fitness trackers allow the user to interact with other users, create group challenges and receive rewards for meeting goals.

There really isn’t a downside to tracking your activity, unless you take your fitness tracker off and it remains lost at the bottom of a drawer.

 

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

February is American Heart Month

Over 50 years ago President Lyndon B. Johnson proclaimed the month of February to be American Heart Month in order to bring attention to one of the leading causes of death in the United States. This tradition has been carried on by every President since.

Each year over 800,000 lives are taken as a result of heart disease, stroke and other cardiovascular diseases. Every 84 seconds someone in the United States dies from the disease and each year approximately 750,000 people experience a heart attack and of those, about 115,000 will not survive.

The American Heart Association recommends the following behavioral modifications to prevent heart disease:

  • Avoid smoking
  • Engage in some form of daily physical activity
  • Follow a healthy diet
  • Maintain a healthy body weight
  • Control cholesterol, blood pressure and blood sugar levels

The death rate from heart disease has been improving slowly over the last decade due to advances in medications, better diagnostic capabilities, and better access to health care, but the statistics are still pretty alarming. If you would like to schedule an appointment with a cardiologist at Jamaica Hospital, please call 718-206-6742.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.