World No Tobacco Day

Since 1987 the World Health Organization has recognized May 31st as a day to bring awareness around the world of the harmful effects of tobacco.

The risks of using tobacco are well documented, however many people around the world are not fully aware of the dangers.  There is a very strong link between tobacco use and heart disease, circulatory problems, and stroke.

Coronary vascular diseases are one of the world’s leading causes of death.  Tobacco use is the second leading cause of these types of diseases, hypertension being the leading cause.

With all of the knowledge we have about the harmful effects of tobacco use, there are still some who have not received the message and as a result, more than 7 million people die each year from the effects of tobacco.

A few of the initiatives that the World Health Organization is trying to implement to inform people about tobacco’s harmful effects are:
• Increase public knowledge of the risks of smoking and secondhand smoke
• Encourage healthcare providers to speak to their patients about the hazards of tobacco
• Encourage governmental  support for educational programs
• Seek ways to promote smoke-free zones in buildings and public spaces
• Increase taxes on tobacco products
• Make it more difficult to purchase tobacco products
• Ban tobacco advertising

If you use tobacco products and would like to quit, speak to your provider. Jamaica Hospital offers a tobacco cessation program to help you. Please call 718-206-8494 to learn more.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Jamaica Hospital Offers Memorial Day Safety Tips

Memorial Day is the unofficial start of Summer for many.  Whether you are planning a weekend road trip, firing up the grill, or heading out on the water, Jamaica Hospital Medical Center wants you to have a fun and safe holiday weekend by following some of these simple safety tips.

Driving Safety Tips:

  • Don’t follow other vehicles too closely and use caution in construction zones.
  • Be sure to make frequent stops and use multiple drivers if necessary.
  • Ensure that your vehicle’s gas tank doesn’t get too low.
  • Let someone know where you’re going before you leave.
  • Avoid distractions such as cell phones, and always buckle your seatbelt

 Backyard Barbeque Tips:

  • Keep your grill out in the open and away from overhangs, enclosed areas, or anything that could catch fire.
  • Make sure that no one gets too close to the grill, such as children or pets.
  • Use long-handled tools as to avoid any burns.
  • Never add starter fluid if your coals have already been lit.

Water Safety Tips:

  • Learn CPR in case of an emergency and ensure that all swimmers are skilled.
  • Actively supervise children and stay within arms-reach of new swimmers.
  • If you’re on a boat, wear a U.S. Coast Guard-approved life jacket.
  • Remain within eyeshot of a lifeguard and swim with a buddy.
  • Keep a life preserver nearby, and in case of drowning, throw it, but don’t jump in.

By following these tips, you can ensure not only just a fun Memorial Day weekend, but a safe Summer.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Spring Cleaning – Naturally

Springtime means spring cleaning. If you’re looking for an alternative to store bought cleaners, check out these low-cost, non-toxic, environmentally friendly cleaning solutions for a fresh smelling home:

  • Baking Soda – cleans, softens water, and scours. You can also use baking soda to deodorize food storage containers and sprinkle on your carpet to absorb smells before vacuuming.
  • White Vinegar – cuts grease, removes mildew, odors, some stains and wax build-up. Use equal parts white vinegar and water to wash both the interior and exterior of your fridge.
  • Lemons  – effective against most household bacteria. Use lemon peels in your garbage disposal to help deodorize it.

You can also try these combinations:

  • All-Purpose Cleaner: Mix 1/2 cup vinegar and 1/4 cup baking soda into 1/2 gallon (2 liters) water. Store and keep. Use for removal of water deposit stains on shower stall panels, bathroom chrome fixtures, windows, and bathroom mirrors.
  • Mold and Mildew cleaner: Use white vinegar or lemon juice full strength. Apply with a sponge or scrubby.
  • Window Cleaner: Mix 2 teaspoons of white vinegar with 1 liter warm water. Use crumpled newspaper or cotton cloth to clean. Only use the black and white newspapers, not the colored ones. Don’t clean windows if the sun is on them, or if they are warm, or streaks will show on drying.
  • Furniture Polish: For varnished wood, add a few drops of lemon oil into a 1/2 cup warm water. Mix well and spray onto a soft, slightly damp, cotton cloth.  Wipe furniture with the cloth, and finish by wiping once more using a dry soft cotton cloth.

One more tip: Whenever you clean your home, save the floor or carpet for last. Clean window blinds and shelves first and then work downwards.  This allows time for the dust to settle before vacuuming.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Jamaica Hospital Now Producing Podcasts For Our Community

Podcasts have become an increasingly popular medium to distribute information about a variety of topics. Millions of people listen to them to learn about many things including politics, entertainment, sports, and health. For this reason, Jamaica Hospital has begun producing and distributing podcasts to help members of our community learn how to better manage their health as well as how our hospital can provide valuable services to assist them.

The podcast which is named Jamaica Hospital MedTalk began production earlier this year. Each episode is approximately 15-minutes-long and features providers from various medical specialties discussing a wide range of topics. 

The podcasts can be found on multiple podcast platforms including Apple, Google, IHeart Radio, Spotify, Stitcher, and others.  In addition, those interested can listen to or download the podcasts on the hospital’s website. Episodes are also being shared on our social media platforms, including Twitter, Instagram, and YouTube.

Jamaica Hospital is dedicated to providing important information about health and wellness to our community. We are excited to utilize our podcasts as a new way to engage everyone.

To listen to any of the Jamaica Hospital podcasts, please click the link below:

https://jamaicahospital.org/podcast/

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

The COVID Antiviral Pill

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Many people have asked if there is a pill they can take to lessen the effects of COVID-19. The answer is yes, but it isn’t for everyone. The pill is manufactured by Pfizer and the brand name is Paxlovid. It has been granted authorization by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for anyone who is 12 years of age and older and weighs at least 88 pounds. The pill is only recommended for people who are at high risk for severe disease. This medication has been shown to have an 89% reduction in the risk of hospitalization in people with severe cases of COVID-19.

If your physician prescribes this medication for you, it should be taken within five days of developing symptoms and having a positive COVID-19 test. It requires you to take three pills twice a day for five days. That is a total of 30 pills.

There are some side effects of taking Paxlovid. They include:

  • Diarrhea
  • Elevated blood pressure
  • Muscle aches
  • Loss of taste

If you test positive for COVID-19, speak to your physician about being a candidate for this medication. Because it does interact with other medications that you may be taking, only a physician can determine your eligibility. To schedule an appointment with a physician at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center you can call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Sharing the “Jamaica Journey” of Diana Masabanda

Over 3,000 employees work for Jamaica Hospital Medical Center. Each has a different career path that brought them to where they are today. Today we share the Jamaica Journey of one such employee.

Diana Masabanda came to Jamaica Hospital as an intern in 2011 as part of a one-year New York City Department of Health grant. She was hired to assist colonoscopy patients by making sure they were prepared for their tests and helped them coordinate follow-up care after their procedure.

Coincidentally, just as the grant was about to expire, Jamaica Hospital was launching its Patient Navigator program, and based on her excellent work, Diana was offered a job in the newly formed department where she would continue to help patients coordinate their care.

However, as a Registered Nurse, Diana wanted to utilize her degree to provide direct patient care, so when an RN position became available in 2013, she applied for the job and was hired to work the evening shift in the hospital’s telemetry unit. Diana explained, “I loved working on the telemetry unit and I learned so much from my colleagues and supervisors but I knew I wanted another challenge.” So after waiting 3 ½ years to satisfy her desire to expand her knowledge, Diana transferred to the Surgical Intensive Care Unit (SICU) in 2016.  There she treated critically ill surgical patients, while at the same time earning her Master’s Degree in Nursing.

Now, having earned her degree, Diana wanted to take all that she learned from the past eight years working at Jamaica Hospital and share it with others in a managerial capacity. According to Diana, “I saw the difference a good manager can make and that is what inspired me to earn my degree.”

Diana applied for and was promoted to Assistant Nurse Manager of the SICU in 2019. At the time, there was only one nurse manager for both the MICU and SICU, but soon after, hospital leadership decided that each unit required its own dedicated supervisor, so, in April of 2022, Diana was promoted once again to the Nurse Manager of the Surgical Intensive Care Unit.

Diana credits her Jamaica Journey to the hospital’s culture of giving their employees opportunities to grow. She believes that Jamaica Hospital is “A great place to grow and learn.”  As a Queens resident, Diana also sees great value in her work, stating, “I understand how important Jamaica Hospital is to this community, and how much our patients need us. That is one of the reasons I am here.”  The other reason Diane enjoys working for Jamaica Hospital is the bonds she has created with her co-workers. “We really work well together. We have great teamwork and that results in better care for our patients.” 

Jamaica Hospital thanks Diana Masabanda for her many years of service to our patients.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Community Health Needs Assessment Survey

In collaboration with hospitals across the state, the MediSys Health Network (Jamaica and Flushing Hospital Medical Center) is conducting a Community Health Needs Assessment survey to determine the most important health concerns of the community, and we would greatly appreciate your input.

The Community Health Needs Assessment survey will assist in the development of a plan that involves many community partners to improve the health of our community. The results of this survey are very important as they can also impact funding, spending, and other wide-reaching decisions about healthcare delivery systems.

The survey is open to all community members residing in New York. To access it, please click here, and share what issues matter to you most.  Please share the survey with family, friends, and others so that their input can be heard. All responses are confidential.

Thank you for your time and for helping us gain valuable insights into the needs of the community.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

World Hand Hygiene Day 2022

May 5th has been designated as World Hand Hygiene Day by the World Health Organization (WHO). The slogan for this year’s campaign is “Unite for safety: clean your hands.” This year’s theme focuses on  recognizing that we can all contribute to healthcare facility’s culture of safety and quality by cleaning our hands.

Practicing good hand hygiene helps with infection prevention and control. This is why the WHO is encouraging people to clean their hands at the right time and with the right products. Furthermore, healthcare workers at all levels and all others who visit healthcare facilities must unite by cleaning their hands, not just on World Hand Hygiene Day, but every day.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Optimize Your Bedroom for A Good Night’s Sleep

One of the keys to achieving a good night’s rest is creating an environment that supports quality sleep.

There are a few factors to consider when cultivating that space. They include lighting, sound, tidiness, color, and temperature.

Here are a few ways you can optimize these elements to create a sleep-friendly bedroom:

  • Turn off all lights- This includes television lights, as well as lights from computers and phones. Exposure to light during sleep can throw off the body’s sleep-wake cycle.
  • Keep it quiet- Remove or turn off electronics and any other items that contribute to background noise. The only noise believed to help you sleep is white noise.
  • Clear clutter- Research shows that sleeping in a cluttered room can affect sleep and lead to anxiety or stress.
  • Choose paint colors that are conducive to sleep- Colors such as lavender, blue, silver and green are known to be calming. Whereas, colors such as purple and red are believed to be stimulating.
  • Sleep in cool temperatures- According to the Sleep Foundation, “The best bedroom temperature for sleep is approximately 65 degrees Fahrenheit (18.3 degrees Celsius). This may vary by a few degrees from person to person, but most doctors recommend keeping the thermostat set between 60 to 67 degrees Fahrenheit (15.6 to 19.4 degrees Celsius) for the most comfortable sleep.”

Following these recommendations can help you achieve quality sleep.  Sleep specialists also recommend sticking to a sleep schedule, avoiding heavy meals a few hours before bedtime, and exercising at least three hours before bed as habits you can apply to improve sleep health.

If you are having problems falling and staying asleep, please consult a sleep specialist.  To schedule an appointment with the Jamaica Hospital Sleep Center, call 718-206-5916.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.