Conditions That Can Affect Your Sense of Smell

Ear Nose and Throat Doctor in Jamaica Queens Every year, thousands of people lose their ability to smell.  According to the National Institutes of Health, 12% of adults in the United States have had some loss of their sense of smell.

A loss of smell can significantly affect a person’s quality of life.  Because smell and taste are linked, most people with a smell disorder are unable to properly taste their food.  Most importantly, they may not be able to detect smells that warn of danger such as smoke or gas.

The inability to smell is typically the result of a problem occurring in the nose, brain or nervous system. One’s loss of smell can be partial or reduced (hyposmia) or complete (anosmia).  In both cases, a loss of smell can be temporary or permanent.

Several conditions can lead to hyposmia; they include:

  • Colds
  • Nasal allergies
  • Flu
  • Hay fever
  • Sinus infection
  • Deviated septum
  • Hormonal imbalances

Anosmia can develop as a result of:

  • Head trauma
  • Upper respiratory viral infections
  • Nasal/ sinus diseases
  • Nasal polyps
  • Bone deformities of the nose
  • Alzheimer’s disease

If you have lost or have had a decline in your ability to smell, you should see a doctor immediately.   Your doctor can perform a physical examination, review your medical history and request a series of tests to determine possible causes. Treatment for smell disorders is based on underlying causes and can include medication or surgery.

To schedule an appointment with an Ear, Nose and Throat doctor at Jamaica Hospital, please call 718-206-7110.

 

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

The Relationship Between Asthma and GERD

There is strong evidence that a relationship exists between asthma and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). According to research, more than 75 percent of people living with asthma have GERD. The reason for this is not certain but studies show a relationship between stomach acid and airways.

GERD which is the reverse flow of stomach acid into the esophagus seems to worsen asthma. One explanation as to why this happens may involve stomach acid which flows back in to the esophagus irritating the throat, the airways and the lungs. It is also a possibility that the acid affects a nerve in the esophagus which causes the lungs to tighten.

Ways to avoid the effects of GERD include:

  • Raising the head of the bed by 6 inches to keep stomach acid from flowing back in to the esophagus
  • Waiting three to four hours after eating a meal before laying down
  • Eating smaller meals
  • Keeping your weight under control
  • Quitting smoking
  • Avoid eating fatty food, chocolate, spicy foods, citrus fruits, tomato sauce,  coffee, tea, or alcohol before laying down

Speak to your physician about treatment options that may be best for you. You can also schedule an appointment with a physician at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center by calling 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Retinal Detachment

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According to the Mayo Clinic, retinal detachment is an emergency situation in which a thin layer of tissue (the retina) at the back of the eye pulls away from its underlying support tissue.

The warning signs of retinal detachment are:

  • The appearance of tiny specks that seem to drift through your field of vision commonly referred to as floaters
  • Flashes of light in one or both eyes
  • Blurred vision
  • A gradual reduction in peripheral or side vision
  • A shadow over the visual field

There are three different types of retinal detachment:

Rhegamtogeneous – The most common type of detachment which occures slowly over time.

Tractional – A detachment that occurs when there is scar tissue growing on the retina’s surface

Exudative – Occurs when fluid accumulates beneath the retna without any tears or holes in the retna.

Aging and family history of retinal detachment are the most common risk factors for this condition. Those who already have a retinal detachment in one eye, have severe nearsightedness, have had previous eye surgery, have received a trauma to the eye or have an eye disorder that thins the retina are equally at risk.

Retinal detachment is an emergency so if you are experiencing flashes of light, floaters or a darkening of your field of vision, you will want to contact your eye doctor immediately.  If a detachment isn’t repaired, you may have permanent vision loss.

If you are experiencing any of the symptoms of retinal detachment or would like to schecule an eye exam, please call the Jamaica Hospital Ophthalmology Center at 718-206-5900 for an appointment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

What Are the Symptoms Of A Pinched Nerve?

Jamaica Hospital, Pinched Nerve

Our nerves are specialized cells that carry important messages throughout our bodies in the form of tiny electrical signals.  When too much pressure is applied to our nerves by surrounding tissues, ligaments or bones, it can result in a pinched – or compressed nerve.

A pinched nerve can occur in various parts of our bodies and they can cause radiating pain, tingling, numbness or weakness. Damage from a pinched nerve may be minor or severe. It may cause temporary or long-lasting problems.

Pinched nerve signs and symptoms include:

  • Numbness or decreased sensation in the area supplied by the nerve
  • Sharp, aching or burning pain, which may radiate outward
  • Tingling, pins and needles sensations
  • Muscle weakness in the affected area
  • Frequent feeling that a foot or hand has “fallen asleep”

Symptoms may worsen when attempting certain movements, such as turning your head or straining your neck. Problems may also become worse while sleeping.

Certain medical conditions can contribute to the development of a pinched nerve. These include:

  • Rheumatoid arthritis
  • Diabetes
  • Obesity
  • Thyroid disease
  • Pregnancy

A pinched nerve can also occur as the result of an injury or from repetitive activities. Conversely, long periods of inactivity or lying down can also cause the problem.

Maintaining a healthy weight, stretching regularly, avoiding repetitive motions and practicing good posture are some tips to avoid developing a pinched nerve.

With rest and other conservative treatments, such as taking over-the-counter medications, most people recover from a pinched nerve within a few days or weeks

See your doctor if the signs and symptoms of a pinched nerve last longer or don’t respond to self-care measures.  Your doctor can provide treatment options to shrink swollen tissue around the nerve. Treatment options may include anti-inflammatory medications, steroid injections, physical therapy, or surgery.

To make an appointment to see a doctor at Jamaica Hospital to treat a pinched nerve, please call 718-206-7001.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.