MediSys Family Medicine Center in Richmond Hill

With much fanfare in 1998, Jamaica Hospital Medical Center opened the doors to the  MediSys Family Medicine Center in Richmond Hill, located at 133-03 Jamaica Avenue and home to the Family Medicine program. Present at the ribbon cutting was the staff of the center and members of the  hospital’s  administration. Also joining them at this momentous occasion was  Dr. David Satcher, the former Surgeon General of the United States.

The staff at this modern facility treats over 24,000 patients each year and the site offers 33 exam rooms, four procedure rooms and four family rooms. Some of the services offered at MediSys Richmond Hill are:  primary care, cardiology, gastroenterology, podiatry, dermatology, allergy, nutrition, osteopathic manipulative treatment, sports medicine, palliative care and integrative health.

Dr. Radeeb Akhtar, an Attending Physician at the Family Medicine Center shares why he enjoys being at the center for the past four years  is because “it is an excellent team, providing high quality primary care for a wonderful culturally rich patient population”.  Rovina Rabindranauth has been a Patient Care Representative for six years and she states that “working with people from different cultures and helping them to get excellent medical care” is what she values about this center. Stephanie Kearney who has been an Ambulatory Care Representative at the center for 12 years explains that “the staff at this center works together as a team and always puts patients first”.

The hours of operation are Monday to Friday 8:00 AM – 4:00 PM and Saturday from 8:00 AM to 1:00 PM. The site offers parking for patients in the rear of the building and is also accessible by public transportation (buses Q56, Q24, and the E train). 

If you would like to schedule an appointment with one of our physicians at the MediSys Family Medicine Center Richmond Hill, please call 718-657-7093.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Dental Screenings for Infants

When is the appropriate time to begin dental screenings for infants? An infant is defined as a baby between birth and one year of age. The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) recommends that infants see the dentist for their first dental exam within six months of getting their first tooth or by their first birthday.

Dr. Deborah Pasquale, Chairperson of the Department of Dentistry at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center makes the following suggestions on how to prepare for the first dental exam:

  • Make sure the infant is well rested the night prior
  • Schedule a morning appointment when the infant is most likely to be well rested and alert
  • Make the visit to the dental specialist a positive experience
  • Give the dentist the infant’s medical history
  • Bring the infant’s favorite toy or blanket to make them feel comfortable

During the exam, the dentist will evaluate the infant for proper gum and tooth development. If necessary, the dentist will gently clean the gums and any teeth that are present. Flouride treatment may also be recommended. To help protect the infant’s teeth at home the dentist will instruct parents on how to properly clean teeth and gums, as well as make suggestions on proper nutrition.

Jamaica Hospital’s pediatric dental center is ultra modern and provides comprehensive dental services for children in a welcoming environment. If you would like to schedule an appointment with a pediatric dentist, please call 718-206-6980

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

COVID SYMPTOMS IN CHILDREN

According to the Mayo Clinic, children of all ages can become ill with coronavirus disease (COVID-19). But most kids who are infected typically don’t become as sick as adults and some might not show any symptoms at all.

Children and adults experience similar symptoms of COVID-19, children’s symptoms tend to be mild and cold-like. Most children recover within one to two weeks. Possible symptoms can include:

  • Fever or chills
  • Nasal congestion or runny nose
  • Cough
  • Sore throat
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
  • Fatigue
  • Headache
  • Muscle aches or body aches
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Poor feeding or poor appetite
  • New loss of taste or smell
  • Belly pain

To determine whether your child has COVID-19, a test using a long-stemmed swab can be administered by a medical professional.  If the test is positive for COVID, it is recommended that you teat mild symptoms such as fever and body aches with acetaminophen or ibuprofen.  Be sure to follow the appropriate guidelines for dosages. Additionally, make sure your child gets plenty of fluids and rest.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Jamaica Hospital Welcomes Dr. Hala Ubaid.

Hala Ubaid DO

Jamaica Hospital would like to introduce our community to Obstetrician and Gynecologist Dr. Hala Ubaid.

Dr. Ubaid was born and raised in New York.  She is fluent in three languages: Urdu, Hindi, and English.

Dr. Ubaid earned her bachelor’s degree from the New York Institute of Technology, then went on to complete her medical education at the New York College of Osteopathic Medicine. She graduated with honors from both programs.

Dr. Ubaid performed at the top of her class and gained extensive experience serving a diverse population during her residency training at Nassau University Medical Center. She is board certified by the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

Dr. Ubaid is highly trained in performing a wide range of obstetrical and gynecological procedures including general gynecologic surgery.

Before joining Jamaica Hospital six months ago, Dr. Ubaid worked at a private practice for several years. “I have always wanted to work in a team setting in which I could mentor medical residents and care for a community that was underserved. I am able to do these things and more at Jamaica Hospital. I’m happy to be a part of this team,” she shared.

Having lived in Queens and with family members currently residing in the borough, giving back to the community is very important to Dr. Ubaid.  Building trust among her patients is equally as important.  Dr. Ubaid believes that one of the best ways to foster relationships with the women and families she cares for is to be sensitive to their cultural needs. “I aim to meet the unique needs of each of my patients. It is my goal to provide them with quality healthcare throughout all stages of life,” she said.

To make an appointment with Dr. Ubaid, please call Jamaica Hospital’s Women’s Health Center at 718-291-3276.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Sickle Cell Awareness Month

Sickle cell disease is an inherited form of anemia – a condition in which red blood cells are unable to carry oxygen throughout the body. For most, red blood cells are round and can move easily through blood vessels, but the red blood cells in people with sickle cell disease are crescent, or half-moon shaped. These irregular shaped cells can get stuck in blood vessels, which can slow or block the flow of oxygen to certain parts of the body.

In addition to being irregular in shape, sickle cells are fragile and break apart easily. Normal red blood cells live an average of four months before they die and need to be replaced. Sickle-shaped cells however only live an average of 20 days. The result of this shortage of blood cells is a loss of energy and general sense of fatigue.
Other symptoms of sickle cell disease include:

• Hand-Foot Syndrome – Often the first sign of sickle cell disease. It is caused by a lack of blood flow to the hands and feet

• Episodes of Pain – Referred to as a “crisis”, these episodes of pain occur when blood flow is blocked to the chest, abdomen, and joints. The frequency and duration of the episodes vary from person to person, but in severe cases, they can result in hospitalization.

• Frequent Infections and Fever– Sickle Cell can cause damage to the spleen, an organ that fights infection, making those with sickle cell at greater risk of developing an infection and an accompanying fever.

• Changes in Skin – People with sickle cell disease can develop a yellow tint to their skin or the whites of their eyes. Skin and nail beds can often become pale.

• Delayed growth – By not receiving enough oxygen rich red blood cells, those with sickle cell disease may also not get the necessary nutrients essential for growth.

The risk of inheriting sickle cell disease is a genetic one. For a baby to be born with it, both parents must carry the sickle cell gene. Doctors can diagnose sickle cell disease before a child is born. Couples who are at risk for passing on this disease to their children may want to talk with a genetic counselor about prenatal testing. The sickle cell gene is more common in families that come from Africa, India, Carribbean islands, and Central and South America.

To determine if you have sickle cell disease, your doctor can order a test to check for hemoglobin S, the defective form of hemoglobin that underlies sickle cell anemia. Further tests can confirm the existence of one gene (carrying the sickle cell trait) or two genes (sickle cell anemia). For those who have sickle cell anemia, treatment is aimed at treating the symptoms and avoiding crisis. Regular check-ups to monitor your red blood cell count are important. Medications are available to reduce pain and prevent complications can be prescribed, and blood transfusions, supplemental oxygen and even bone marrow transplants may also be necessary.

Jamaica Hospital serves a culturally rich and diverse population. Many members of our community are from the parts of the world most often affected by sickle cell disease. We encourage anyone living with sickle cell disease to carefully manage their condition. The hospital also recommends all potential parents to be tested for the sickle cell trait.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

September is Healthy Aging Month

Healthy Aging Month is an annual observation created to bring awareness to the fact that there is an increase in the number of people who are 45 and older living in the United States.

There are over 76 million people, once considered to be part of the Baby-Boom generation, in the U.S. today who are over the age of 50. In addition to that, people who belong to the Generation-X started to turn 50 in the year 2015.

This segment of the population needs to be mindful of the importance of their social, mental, physical and financial well-being.

Tips for staying healthy after the age of 50 include:

  • Keeping active
  • If you smoke – quitting now
  • Remaining socially engaged
  • Staying positive
  • Finding things to do that make you smile
  • Getting  regular medical check-ups
  • Eating healthy
  • Exercising  regularly
  • Seeking help for mental health issues

If you would like to schedule an appointment with a physician at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center to discuss your medical concerns, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Healthy Labor Day Cookout Tips

One of the best things about the Labor Day Weekend is spending time with family and friends at cookouts and barbeques. While we look forward to these outings, the foods found can cause us to pack on the pounds. Whether attending or hosting your a Labor Day gathering, try some of these calorie conscious techniques:

• Skip the chips and dip. Instead, try healthier alternatives, like fresh vegetables. If you want to make a dip, use non-fat yogurt instead of sour cream or mayonnaise.

• Try kabobs. They offer the same opportunity to enjoy grilled chicken, beef, or pork, but minus the bread. Plus, the grilled vegetables on them will help you fill up.

• If you insist on having a burger or hot dog, choose healthier options, such as chicken or turkey instead of beef. Also, avoid whit flout buns and breads and opt for whole grains instead.

• Instead of heavy macaroni or potato salads loaded with mayonnaise, look for salads with a vinaigrette base as a lighter alternative.

• Don’t limit yourself to just grilling meat. There are many types of fish that are not only healthier, but also taste great on the grill. Vegetables, lightly coated in olive oil are also tasty and filling.

• For dessert, serve some refreshing summer fruit, such as cherries, peaches, plums or melons.
By following these tips, you can still enjoy your end of summer, but not pay for it in the fall.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Wisdom Teeth

Wisdom teeth, also referred to as the third set of molars, are the last set of teeth to develop. They form in the back of the mouth on the upper and lower jaw. Most people’s wisdom teeth surface when they are teenagers or young adults.

Wisdom teeth can become a problem when they fail to grow in proper alignment with the rest of our teeth.  When these teeth are not growing in correctly, it is referred to as being impacted. A tooth that is impacted may have only broken through the gum partially, or not at all. This can lead to infection, pain, tooth decay, gum disease and crowding of the teeth that are adjacent.

The signs and symptoms of an impacted wisdom tooth include:

  • Tenderness of the jaw
  • Bad breath
  • Bleeding gums
  • Swollen gums
  • Problems opening the mouth

Wisdom teeth that are impacted can’t be prevented. The best way to monitor for a potential problem is to have regular oral check-ups and an x-ray of the mouth every year. Not all wisdom teeth are going to be impacted, but when they are, and if symptoms develop, your dentist may want to remove them to prevent potential infections, disruption of the other teeth, and also to prevent further discomfort.

If you would like to schedule an appointment with a dentist at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, you may call 718-206-6980

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Issues Back to School Safety Guidelines

As we near the near the beginning of the school year, many parents are concerned about the necessary precautions that they should be taking to protect their children from the Covid-19 virus. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ( CDC ) issued guidelines to protect students, teachers, staff and families. These guidelines are based upon the most recent current scientific evidence and can change as more information becomes available. The CDC guidelines are suggestions and are meant to supplement not override the safety laws established by any federal, state, local, territorial or tribal health entities.

The current CDC Guidelines can be found on their website

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/community/schools-childcare/k-12-guidance.html

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

What Causes Feet to Swell ?

For many people who spend long hours standing every day, experiencing swollen feet is a pretty routine occurrence. The swelling is caused by an accumulation of fluid in the skin and typically will resolve once the feet are elevated.

The symptoms of swelling are dependent on the underlying cause is. Swelling can be mild puffiness with no discomfort to very severe with changes in skin texture, color, and with a lot of pain. In very severe cases, swelling can lead to ulcerations, infections, and ultimately death if not treated in a timely manner.

Some of the medical issues of swollen feet can be due to:

  • Injury
  • Pregnancy
  • Congestive heart  failure
  • Lymphedema
  • Blood Clots
  • Varicose veins
  • Infections
  • Medications such as steroids, antidepressants, and calcium channel blockers
  • Venous insufficiency

Diagnosing swollen feet usually starts with a visual inspection and then by pressing into the skin with a finger to see if it leads to an indentation.

In some cases preventing swollen feet can be done by wearing support stockings, proper exercise, eating a healthy diet low in salt, and avoiding smoking and drinking alcohol.

Treating swollen feet is dependent on the cause and can include:

  • Medication
  • Surgery
  • Wrapping the limb with an elastic bandage
  • Elevating the foot above the level of the heart when possible

If you are experiencing swollen feet, consult your doctor who will find out what is causing the problem. If you would like to schedule an appointment with a doctor at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, you can call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.