A Tasty Recipe for Baked Lemon Chicken

Warm spring evenings call  for an easy to prepare recipe for baked lemon chicken to enjoy. Here is a recipe from the Food Network that we recommend.

https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/food-network-kitchen/baked-lemon-chicken-recipe-2128674

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Spotlighting Jamaica Hospital’s Mobile Crisis Team

May is Mental Health Awareness Month, and we are highlighting the important work of Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Mobile Crisis Program in our community.

Jamaica Hospital’s Mental Health Department operates the Mobile Crisis Program as part of its mental health emergency services. The program is the only one of its kind to serve our community and hospital, responding to mental health crisis referrals, 24/7, 365 days a year. Our providers rapidly provide in-person visits within two hours of receiving a referral.

The program is staffed by a team of dedicated mental health administrators, coordinators, and social workers who provide comprehensive crisis intervention, home-visit, repatriation, counseling, and support services to countless patients and families.

Jamaica Hospital’s mobile crisis team emphasizes compassion and empathy when delivering mental health care and support. Each care provider is highly trained to engage appropriately with individuals in crisis or those experiencing psychiatric emergencies. Our team serves a very diverse population; therefore, special attention is paid to the unique and cultural needs of each individual and loved one encountered.

The primary goal of the hospital’s mobile crisis program is to go above and beyond to offer assistance.  This goal is achieved by providing more support than average, which involves thorough follow-up care, and connecting individuals to social services and programs needed to improve their mental health and overall quality of life.

Jamaica Hospital’s Mobile Crisis Program aims to help individuals and families in our community by safely and compassionately engaging with those experiencing a mental health crisis, reducing unnecessary hospitalizations, and reducing the risk of future crises through the provision of continuous care.  Participation is voluntary; however, if it is determined that a person in crisis needs further psychiatric or medical assessment, arrangements may be made for them to be transported to a hospital psychiatric emergency room.

In New York City, you can request help from a mobile crisis team if you are concerned about a family member, friend, or acquaintance who is experiencing or is at risk of a mental health crisis. You can also request a team for yourself. To request a team, please call 988.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Heart Palpitations

Experiencing heart palpitations can be a very frightening occurrence. These palpitations have been described as feeling as though the heart is racing, missing a beat, pounding, or fluttering. Palpitations can be felt in the chest, the neck or the throat and they are seen more frequently in women than in men.

Some of the most common causes of heart palpitations include:

  • Anxiety
  • Stress
  • Depression
  • Fear
  • Fever
  • Panic attacks
  • Strenuous exercise
  • Pregnancy
  • Medications that contain pseudoephedrine
  • Consuming too much alcohol, caffeine, nicotine, or narcotics ( cocaine or amphetamines)

It is important to find the reason for  experiencing heart palpitations and knowing how often they occur. Tests that will help a physician identify the cause include a blood test, an EKG, a chest x-ray, a Holter monitor and an ultrasound of the heart.

It is best to seek immediate medical help if the heart palpitations are accompanied by:

  • Feeling shortness of breath
  • Feeling dizzy
  • Feeling chest pain
  • Feeling light headed

Treatment for heart palpitations will be determined by what is causing them. When possible, eliminating external influences will be the first line of treatment. If the palpitations are caused by an irregular heart beat, medications may need to be prescribed.

It is important to get immediate medical care by calling 9-1-1 if the heart palpitations are accompanied by chest pain, severe dizziness,  severe shortness of breath, or passing out.

If you would like to schedule an appointment with a physician at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Cystic Fibrosis Awareness Month

A child being tested for cystic fibrosis.May is Cystic Fibrosis Awareness Month. During this time, Jamaica Hospital Medical Center is working to provide important information about this disease for our patients, including its symptoms, potential complications, and current available treatments. 

Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a hereditary disease that affects the mucus-producing cells in your body.  CF occurs when there is a mutation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. This mutation disables cells from moving chloride (a component of salt) to their surfaces. Without the movement of chloride, cells cannot hydrate properly, causing your body to produce thicker, stickier mucus.

The buildup of heavy mucus caused by CF can damage the digestive system, lungs, and other organs that depend on mucus to function by obstructing the ducts, tubes or passageways of these organs. Those living with cystic fibrosis also often have abnormally high levels of salt in their sweat. Other symptoms that may develop as a result of the disease include:

  • Frequent lung infections, such as recurrent pneumonia or bronchitis
  • Persistent cough with thick mucus
  • Frequent sinus infections
  • Wheezing
  • Shortness of breath
  • Nasal polyps
  • Fatigue
  • Delayed growth or puberty
  • Bowel movements that produce greasy, bulky stool
  • Severe constipation
  • Male infertility

All babies born in the United States are screened for cystic fibrosis by testing small blood samples. If someone is suspected to have CF, their doctor can also order a sweat test to determine if their chloride levels are normal.

Currently, there is no cure for CF; treatment generally focuses on alleviating symptoms and reducing complications. Treatment may include: 

  • Medications, such as antibiotics for lung infections, anti-inflammatory medications, stool softeners, mucus-thinning drugs, medications that assist in nutrient absorption, and medications that treat gene mutations
  • Physical therapy
  • Pulmonary rehabilitation
  • Surgery

To learn more about cystic fibrosis or to make an appointment with a pulmonologist at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call (718) 206-7126.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Food Allergy Awareness Week

May 12- 18, 2024  has been designated as Food Allergy Awareness Week in an effort to raise awareness of food allergies and anaphylaxis.

According to Food Allergy Research & Education (FARE), over 33 million Americans have a serious and potentially life-threatening food allergy. This number indicates that food allergies are much more common than previously believed.

An allergic reaction occurs when the body’s immune system mistakenly identifies a food component as a hazardous substance and attacks it. The effects of food allergies may appear on the skin, in the respiratory passage, or the gastrointestinal tract. The symptoms of food allergies may vary from mild to severe, and in extreme cases, they can even be fatal.

Anaphylaxis is a very serious allergic reaction that can cause death. This type of allergic reaction requires immediate action and medical attention. You must be prepared for an emergency if you or a loved one has a severe food allergy. Learn the signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis, which can include difficulty breathing, tongue swelling, low blood pressure., dizziness, or fast heart rate.  You should create an emergency care plan in the event anaphylaxis occurs; this may include the administration of epinephrine, a life-saving drug, and calling 911 if symptoms persist.

Every year in the United States, approximately 30,000 individuals are brought to hospital emergency departments due to severe allergic reactions. Jamaica Hospital joins the effort to raise awareness about food allergies and urges everyone to learn more about this growing, yet manageable issue.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Highlights of The MediSys Health Network Cancer Center’s Ribbon-Cutting Ceremony

On Monday, April 8th, The MediSys Health Network held a very special ribbon-cutting ceremony to commemorate the opening of the network’s cancer center, located on the concourse level of Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s C building.

MediSys President and CEO, Bruce J. Flanz began the ceremony by remarking that the opening of the cancer center was a long time in the making, and how excited he was that the day had finally come.  He also thanked everyone involved in making the completion of the project a reality.

Congressman Gregory Meeks and Queensborough President Donovan Richards also joined Mr. Flanz and a room full of hospital employees. They spoke about the importance of having a comprehensive cancer center in Queens, where residents could receive high-quality care without needing to leave the borough.  The Congressman and the Borough President also praised MediSys’ leadership for continuing to understand and meet the needs of our community, both vowed to lend their support to the organization in achieving those objectives.

Also present were multiple members of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center’s (MSK) leadership, including Hospital President Shelly Anderson. During her remarks, Anderson shared how excited everyone at MSK is about the two organizations entering the next phase of an agreement to work together to provide equitable cancer care to the people of Queens.

The MediSys Health Network Cancer Center features 24 multi-purpose treatment rooms. Each of the private rooms is designed for a relaxing patient experience and includes comfortable chairs, flat-screen televisions, and soothing murals on the walls. When configuring the layout, an emphasis was placed on ensuring optimal patient/provider interaction.

While receiving treatment in the center, patients will also have access to various support services, including on-site mental health and integrative health professionals as well as nutritional counselors. In addition, patient navigators are available to guide our patients through every step of their journey. This has all been made available to ensure our patients receive everything they need for a positive outcome.

Our new cancer center is officially open and accepting patients. We invite you to take a virtual tour of our facility here: https://virtualtours.llc/projects/1147jhmc/final/index.htm

To learn more about our center or to schedule an appointment, please call (718) 206-8263.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

May is Designated as Mental Health Awareness Month

The month of May has been designated as Mental Health Awareness Month. This designation was first made in 1949 by the National Association for Mental Health. The goal of this recognition is to help take away the stigma of having a mental illness, increase awareness of resources available to treat mental illness, and to educate people about what it means to have a mental illness.

In observance of Mental Health Awareness Month, we are sharing important statistics to know:

  • Mental illness affects one in twenty people in the United States each year, and one in five of these people are affected very seriously
  • Mental illness affects one in six children, and only half are getting treatment
  • Half of all lifetime mental illness starts by age 14 and 75% by age 24.
  • Anxiety disorder is found in 48 million people
  • Major depression is found in 21 million people
  • Bipolar depression is found in 7 million people
  • Obsessive compulsive disorder is found in 3 million people
  • Schizophrenia is found in 1.5 million people

A person who has mental health issues can live a full and productive life if they receive the proper care. Jamaica Hospital Medical Center has a comprehensive Mental Health Department. If you would like to schedule an appointment, please call 718-206-5575.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Arthritis Awareness Month

An old woman holding her knee due to arthritis pain.Arthritis is a chronic disease that typically causes pain, inflammation, and stiffness in your joints. It affects one in every seven people and, which it most often affect older adults, it can occur at any age. Arthritis can develop gradually or quickly depending on a variety of factors, but once it starts, it usually lasts your entire life.

There are many different types of arthritis, but two of the most common types are osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Osteoarthritis usually affects weight-bearing joints such as the hips, knees, and back, but it can affect almost any joint. It causes pain and stiffness due to degeneration of the bone and cartilage. Men and women are usually affected at the same rate. Rheumatoid arthritis is caused by the body’s own immune system; it affects the lining of your joints first, then spreads to cartilage and bone. It affects women more often than men.

If arthritis symptoms last for 10 days or longer, you should discuss them with your doctor. These symptoms may be constant or intermittent; they may also occur during physical activity or at rest. When diagnosing arthritis, your doctor will perform a physical exam and take your complete medical history into account. Other diagnostic tests may include:

  • Blood testing
  • Urine analysis
  • Joint fluid specimen
  • X-ray testing

There are many ways that arthritis symptoms can be reduced so that people who have it can remain active. Several medications that reduce pain and swelling are available over-the-counter or may be prescribed by your doctor. Additionally, many people experience improvements in symptoms and increased joint mobility from exercise programs and physical therapy. Applying ice or heat to affected joints can also help.

If you are experience arthritis symptoms, you can schedule an appointment with a specialist at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center by calling (718) 206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Employee Spotlight Shines on Bibi Samlall

This month, we are proud to shine our Employee Spotlight on Bibi Samlall, Ambulatory Care Representative in the Emergency Department.  Bibi has been working at Jamaica Hospital Medical  Center for 10 years.

Bibi is a native of Georgetown, Guyana where she grew up and attended Charlestown Secondary School. She is currently enrolled in nursing school where she is pursuing her dream of becoming a registered nurse.

Bibi moved to the United States in 1999, first living in Queens. Currently, Bibi lives in Valley Stream,  on Long island. She has two children, a son Rohan who is 19 and a daughter Raveena who is 23.  In her free time, Bibi likes to watch movies, listen to music, her favorite being Bollywood and Chutney,  and spending time with her family. When she has time off from work and school, she enjoys traveling. Some of her favorite places to visit are Aruba, Jamaica, and the Dominican Republic. Bibi enjoys many different types of food, especially chicken curry and fried rice. She enjoys bike riding and her favorite sport is cricket. The things in life that are most important to Bibi are spending quality time with her family, her education and having gratitude for everything she has.

Bibi has always wanted to work in a healthcare setting, especially in one that prioritizes patient care and satisfaction. This is why she enjoys working at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center. Her priorities at work are to make sure that every patient has a pleasant experience. Her colleagues are like family to her and this helps all of them with their overall job satisfaction. We look forward to Bibi continuing to work with us for many more years to come.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

National Infant Immunization Week

Infants under the age of two are susceptible to a variety of serious illnesses that can significantly harm or even kill them, as their immune system is still in an early stage of development. This is why the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends a series of immunizations that can protect infants against some of the most dangerous diseases to their health.

Many parents may have concerns about vaccinating their children due to potential side effects. While mild adverse reactions are possible with many vaccines, they typically disappear on their own within a few days. Generally, the side effects most children may expect include reactions such as fever, fatigue, body aches, and swelling or tenderness around the site of the injection. More serious, long-lasting side effects are extremely rare.

Vaccines such as those given to infants only use the ingredients necessary to be safe and effective. These ingredients may often include adjuvants (commonly found in antacids and antiperspirants) and stabilizers (such as sugar or gelatin). Additionally, all vaccines go through extensive lab testing, often for years, before they are available to the general public.

The CDC recommends vaccinating children under the age of two against:

  • Hepatitis B
  • Rotavirus
  • Diphtheria, tetanus, & acellular pertussis
  • Haemophilus influenzae type b
  • Pneumococcal conjugate
  • Inactivated poliovirus
  • COVID-19
  • Influenza
  • Measles, mumps, rubella
  • Varicella
  • Hepatitis A

You can find the complete schedule of recommended vaccines for your child by age on the CDC’s website. To schedule an appointment for your child to receive the vaccines they need, you can call Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center at 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.