Caring for Baby Teeth

A baby’s teeth are very important and providing them with proper care is necessary to make sure they don’t develop cavities later in life.

Dental care for a baby starts even before their teeth start to break through the gums. The first steps that should be taken with an infant are to make sure their gums are kept clean. This is done by using a soft wash cloth or a soft gauze pad and wiping the gums at least twice a day, especially after each feeding. This will help to remove harmful bacteria that may accumulate.

Once a baby’s teeth start to develop, between six and eight months of age, a toothbrush specially designed for them should be used. These toothbrushes have very soft bristles and a small head to fit into a baby’s mouth. It isn’t necessary to use toothpaste at the beginning. Most babies will start to develop

To prevent cavities from developing, a baby should only be given water, milk, or formula. Things to stay away from are fruit juices, sodas, and sugary drinks.

A pediatric dentist can help provide tips to care for your baby’s teeth and to insure that they develop properly. A first visit with a dentist should be scheduled around their first birthday. If you would like to schedule an appointment with a pediatric dentist at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Dental Department, please call 718-206-6980.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Quick and Healthy Chicken Salad Recipe

Want to turn classic chicken salad into a healthy meal?  Try switching out mayo for plain greek yogurt to decrease the saturated fat and calories while maintaining flavor.

For a deliciously healthy alternative combine:

  • Greek yogurt
  • Almonds
  • Celery
  • Grapes
  • Honey
  • Green onion
  • Dill
  • Chunks of chicken

For the entire recipe, visit – https://www.wellplated.com/greek-yogurt-chicken-salad/

Bon apetite!

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

#WellnessWednesday Tips

When seeking to achieve a wellness lifestyle, try to keep it simple.

Some simple ways you can bring more wellness into your life are:

  • Drink more fluids
  • Remember to eat a healthy breakfast daily
  • Make a list of goals you’d like to meet
  • Keep healthy snacks on hand so that you do not become too hungry
  • Move around during the course of the day. Take a brisk walk or just get up from your desk chair and stretch
  • Get enough sleep.  It is recommended that six to eight hours of sleep is beneficial
  • Make time for yourself (meditation, yoga, exercise, prayer)
  • Organize and de-clutter your life and surroundings

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Meet Our Doctors: Dr. Rebecca Winderman

Pediatric Gastroenterologist In QueensJamaica Hospital would like to introduce you to our new Pediatric Gastroenterologist, Dr. Rebecca Winderman.

Since joining Jamaica Hospital in November of 2018 Dr. Winderman has dedicated her time to not only expanding the GI services offered at the hospital, but also educating her colleagues and the community about the various gastrointestinal issues that can affect children, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), liver disease and allergic inflammatory disease of the esophagus (EOE).

One of the reasons Dr. Winderman came to Jamaica Hospital was she recognized a need in the community for a Pediatric GI program.  Many of the services she now offers at Jamaica Hospital were not otherwise offered in Queens That’s why she is excited to be able to offer care at Jamaica Hospital.

According to Dr. Winderman, “My primary goal is to gain the trust of my patients and their parents because treating pediatric GI issues is often a long journey. By working with parents on a treatment plan that includes various forms of therapies and nutritional programs, I am confident that together we can effectively manage these conditions and prevent the long-term complications they can have on a child’s growth and development.”

Dr. Winderman currently sees patients at the following locations:

TJH Pediatrics
89-06 135 Street – Suite 7T
Jamaica, NY 11418
718-206-7591
Jamaica Hospital Ambulatory Care Center
8900 Van Wyck Expressway
Jamaica, NY 11418
718-206-7001

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Poison Ivy

Poison Ivy SymptomsMany people enjoy spending time outside during the summer. With more time spent outdoors, there is an increased risk of exposure to plants that can cause allergic reactions.  The most common plants of this kind are poison ivy, poison oak and poison sumac; all of which grow in wooded or vegetated areas and contain urushiol.

Urushiol is an oily resin found in the leaves, stems and roots of each plant. When this substance comes in contact with our skin, it can lead to a reaction we know as poison ivy rash. An allergic reaction typically occurs 24 to 48 hours after exposure and symptoms can last up to two or three weeks.  Symptoms can be mild or severe and may include:

  • Redness
  • Blistering
  • Itching
  • Swelling

There are several ways to minimize our exposure and reaction to plants that can cause poison ivy rash.  We can:

  • Learn to identify poison ivy, poison oak and poison sumac
  • Steer clear of these plants by avoiding areas in which they grow
  • Wear protective clothing such as long sleeves and pants
  • Immediately wash areas that have been exposed with soap and water
  • Bathe pets that have been exposed

Approximately 60 to 80% of people who are exposed to urushiol will have a reaction.  For mild cases, taking cool showers and applying soothing topical treatments such as calamine lotion is recommended.  In severe cases, doctors may prescribe pills or creams that contain steroids or antihistamines.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Retinal Detachment

retina, retinaldetachment, eyeexam, ophthalmology

 

According to the Mayo Clinic, retinal detachment is an emergency situation in which a thin layer of tissue (the retina) at the back of the eye pulls away from its underlying support tissue.

The warning signs of retinal detachment are:

  • The appearance of tiny specks that seem to drift through your field of vision commonly referred to as floaters
  • Flashes of light in one or both eyes
  • Blurred vision
  • A gradual reduction in peripheral or side vision
  • A shadow over the visual field

There are three different types of retinal detachment:

Rhegamtogeneous – The most common type of detachment which occures slowly over time.

Tractional – A detachment that occurs when there is scar tissue growing on the retina’s surface

Exudative – Occurs when fluid accumulates beneath the retna without any tears or holes in the retna.

Aging and family history of retinal detachment are the most common risk factors for this condition. Those who already have a retinal detachment in one eye, have severe nearsightedness, have had previous eye surgery, have received a trauma to the eye or have an eye disorder that thins the retina are equally at risk.

Retinal detachment is an emergency so if you are experiencing flashes of light, floaters or a darkening of your field of vision, you will want to contact your eye doctor immediately.  If a detachment isn’t repaired, you may have permanent vision loss.

If you are experiencing any of the symptoms of retinal detachment or would like to schecule an eye exam, please call the Jamaica Hospital Ophthalmology Center at 718-206-5900 for an appointment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

ADHD In Children

ADHD In Children Does your child find it hard to pay attention?  Does your child feel the need to move constantly during times when they shouldn’t?  Do they constantly interrupt others?

All children struggle at times to pay attention, listen, follow directions, sit still, or wait their turn. But for kids with ADHD, these challenges occur more frequently.

ADHD stands for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. It is a medical condition that makes it difficult for a person to pay attention and control impulsive behaviors.

Kids with ADHD may have signs from one, two, or all three of these categories:

  • Inattentive: Kids who are inattentive (easily distracted) have trouble focusing their attention, concentrating, and staying on task. They may not listen well to directions, may miss important details, and may not finish what they start. They may seem absent-minded or forgetful and lose track of their things.
  • Hyperactive: Kids who are hyperactive are fidgety, restless, and easily bored. They may have trouble sitting still, or staying quiet when needed. They may rush through things and make careless mistakes. Without meaning to, they may act in ways that disrupt others.
  • Impulsive: Kids who are impulsive act too quickly before thinking. They often interrupt and find it hard to wait. They may do things without asking for permission, take things that aren’t theirs, or act in ways that are risky. They may have emotional reactions that seem too intense for a given situation.

It is important to keep in mind that some of these behaviors are normal in children who are very young. Displaying these signs does not always mean that a child has ADHD. However, parents are encouraged to consult their doctor, if they have concerns.

To diagnose ADHD, doctors start by assessing a child’s health, behavior, and activity. Your doctor might ask you to complete checklists about your child’s behavior and might ask you to give your child’s teacher a checklist as well.

After gathering this information, doctors diagnose ADHD if it’s clear that:

  • A child’s distractibility, hyperactivity, or impulsivity goes beyond what’s usual for their age.
  • The behaviors have been going on since the child was young.
  • Distractibility, hyperactivity, and impulsivity affect the child at school and at home.
  • A health check shows that there are no other underlying medical problems.

If your child is diagnosed with ADHD, treatment may include:

  • Medication
  • Behavior therapy
  • Parent coaching
  • School support

Parents are encouraged to work with the child’s school to create a nurturing environment, focus on the child’s strengths and positive qualities and connect with others for support and awareness.

If you have further questions about ADHD or would like to schedule an appointment with a Family Medicine physician at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718- 206-6942.

Dr. Khadiga Ahmed D.O.

 

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Heart Disease and Hot Weather

Summertime heat affects everyone, but for people who suffer from heart disease, it can be life threatening. Activities that are performed when the weather is mild may not have much risk associated with them but once the temperature rises they can lead to heat exhaustion and heat stroke. People with heart disease are very susceptible to extreme weather conditions.

When we are exposed to the heat, our bodies respond by sweating, which is the body’s way to maintain a normal temperature. . Heat as well as the body’s response to it, leads to enlarged blood vessels, lower blood pressure and higher heart rate. This combination can cause people with heart problems to serious problems due to the stress on the cardiovascular system. If the heart is already weakened it may not be able to pump blood effectively and keep the blood pressure at a high enough level. This can lead to an overheating of the body. Some medications that are prescribed for heart patients also lower the heart rate, which can be compounded during the hot weather.

Some helpful tips for people with heart disease in the hot weather are:

  • Stay out of the heat during the middle of the day
  • Wear clothing that is loose fitting and light
  • Do not perform strenuous activities in hot weather
  • Keep hydrated and avoid alcohol and caffeine.
  • Stay indoors in an air conditioned environment

Discuss with your physician ways to stay healthy during the hot summer months. If you would like to schedule an appointment with a cardiologist at Jamaica Hospital, please call 718-206-6742.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Meet Dr. Gagandeep Singh

Cardiologist in Queens New York Jamaica Hospital would like to introduce Dr. Gagandeep Singh to the community.

Dr. Singh is an Interventional Cardiologist who has been with Jamaica Hospital for two years.

He specializes in treating patients who have had or are at risk of heart attacks, heart failure, and other cardiovascular complications.

As an interventional cardiologist, Dr. Singh has advanced training in diagnosing and treating cardiovascular diseases, congenital and structural heart abnormalities by way of complex catheter-based and imaging procedures.   Dr. Singh’s expertise in performing procedures such as coronary angiograms and coronary stenting has gained him recognition as a leader in his field.

He takes great pride in being able to help patients and families take charge of their heart health and improve their overall wellness.  “I am most happy when I help my patients to successfully manage their health because I know that I am also, directly and indirectly, helping their loved ones.”

Dr. Singh is very excited about practicing at Jamaica Hospital, as he is very familiar with our community.  “I am a New Yorker; I was raised in Queens and went to school in the area.  So in many ways, taking care of this community is very personal to me.  I want to make sure that everyone is provided with very best in heart health care.”

Dr. Singh treats patients at Jamaica Hospital’s Ambulatory Care Center for an appointment, please call 718-206-7001.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Why Does Warm Weather Increase the Frequency of Kidney Stones ?

Why do kidney stones occur more frequently during warmer weather? When the weather is warm, we are more likely to become dehydrated which increases the risk for our bodies to develop kidney stones.

We tend to sweat more in the hotter months which deplete our body of fluids; this in turn will make our urine more concentrated. Urine that is highly concentrated allows for the formation of stones made up of calcium, oxalate or uric acid. A stone can be as small as a grain of sand or as large as a pea.

When the body is dehydrated, there is also less of a flow of urine through the ureters (the tube between the kidney and the bladder) which is an important factor in moving the kidney stones through this passageway.

Kidney stones can cause a tremendous amount of pain when passing through the ureter. This pain can be felt in the lower back and groin.

Additional symptoms of kidney stones include:

  • Blood in the urine
  • Nausea
  • Fever and Chills
  • Vomiting
  • If you have had kidney stones, there is a 50 percent chance that you can develop more within the following five years. However, you can take a few precautions to lower your risk or prevent stones from developing. Ways to prevent kidney stones include:
  • Drinking at least eight to twelve glasses of water each day to dilute the urine
  • Limiting your salt intake
  • Cutting back on red meats, organ meats and shellfish
  • Drinking sugar free lemonade or limeade as the citrate will prevent stone formation
  • If you are experiencing any of the symptoms of a kidney stone, seek medical help right away. If you would like to schedule an appointment with a urologist at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center please call 718-206-7110.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.