A Covid-19 Vaccine Myth

There are many myths being spread about the COVID-19 vaccines and this is causing some people to be hesitant about getting it. The vaccines currently being administered within the United States have been proven to be safe.

One myth is that the vaccines are made with egg-based products and people who are allergic to eggs may have a reaction. It should be clear that neither the Pfizer/BioNTech nor the Moderna COVID vaccines are made with egg-based products.

Even though these vaccines are not made with egg-based products, those who have a history of allergic reactions to vaccines should still mention this before receiving the vaccine. All patients, regardless of their history of allergic reactions should be monitored for 30 minutes after receiving the vaccine.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

#WorkoutWednesday – Running Do’s and Don’t’s

It is no secret that exercise does wonders for your health.  Running, in particular, offers many benefits, and is known to improve your mental and physical wellbeing.

In a study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, it was found that” five to 10 minutes a day of low-intensity running is enough to extend life by several years.” Similar studies have also indicated that running can help reduce the risks associated with obesity, diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure and some cancers.

Given the benefits, your doctor may recommend that you include running as part of your exercise regimen. If you decide to run, there are a few things you should keep in mind in order to prevent injury and optimize your workout. Here are some running dos and don’ts:

The Do’s:

  • Keep your head up -This will keep your body in alignment and prevent injuries
  • Stretch and warm up-This reduces muscle tightness and increases your range of motion
  • Start slowly -Starting off too fast can lead to overexertion which may result in side aches
  • Schedule rest days –Allow your body days to recover and reduce the risk of exhaustion
  • Remain hydrated- Drinking enough water will prevent dehydration

The Don’ts:

  • Do not run in shoes that are worn or not intended for running- Shoes that are worn or not designed for running may lack support and lead to injuries
  • If running outdoors, do not run with headphones – It is important to be aware of your surroundings and avoid hazards
  • Do not eat big meals before running-Eating too much can slow you down
  • Do not ignore injuries- It is important that you rest if you are injured, not doing so can lead to complications

The most important thing to consider before starting your running routine is to speak with your doctor. Experts recommend that you receive a full medical checkup if you are over the age of 40, have preexisting medical conditions, are obese or have a family history of heart disease.  Your doctor will be able to assess your health and determine if running is best for you.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Irritable Bowel Syndrome Awareness Month

April is Irritable Bowel Syndrome Awareness Month (IBS). This is a condition that affects the large intestine resulting in the following symptoms:

  • Bloating
  • Gas
  • Nausea
  • Abdominal cramps
  • Diarrhea or constipation

There is no general rule of what to eat and what to avoid in treating IBS. A physician will go through a patient’s daily diet and see if there are certain foods that are more likely to act as triggers. The foods that physicians who treat this disease may recommend avoiding include:

  • Wheat
  • Carbonated Drinks
  • Dairy products
  • Beans
  • Cabbage

Some of these symptoms can be relieved by modifying the diet as well as taking certain medications.

The classifications of medications include:

Antibiotics

Anti-diarrheal agents

Anti-spasmodics

Prescription laxatives

Prescription pain medications

If you are experiencing recurring intestinal distress and would like to speak with a physician at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Varicose Veins

According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, approximately half of Americans age 50 and older have varicose veins.  These veins appear to bulge from the skin and are dark purple or blue in color. They are most commonly located in the legs and are caused by the pooling of blood in enlarged veins.

While varicose veins are very common among both men and women, there are several factors that can increase a person’s risk of being affected. This includes:

  • Heredity
  • Hormonal changes, such as puberty, pregnancy, and menopause
  • Increasing age
  • Obesity
  • Sun exposure

The Dangers of Varicose Veins
Not only can varicose veins cause discomfort and embarrassment for the men and women who have them, but they can also sometimes lead to more serious health conditions. If left untreated, varicose veins can lead to:

  • Blood Clots- Blood clots are extremely dangerous, as they may dislodge from the vein and travel to the lungs or heart, preventing either from functioning properly.
  • Sores and Ulcers- Varicose veins may lead to sores and ulcers of the skin because of long-term buildup of fluid.

Varicose veins may also cause ongoing swelling, rashes, and pain, and can increase a person’s chances of infection.

Seeking Medical Attention
Varicose veins may signal a higher risk for circulatory problems. If you have varicose veins that cause pain, swelling, itching, tiredness, or numbness in the legs, you should seek medical attention. Jamaica Hospital offers a variety of options to treat varicose veins.

If you have varicose veins and would like to schedule a consultation with a vascular surgeon at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s, Ambulatory Care Center please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Employee Spotlight Shines on Devika Nanan

This month we are proud to shine our Employee Spotlight on Devika Nanan. a Medical Assistant (PAR) in our Ambulatory Care Department. Devika came to Jamaica Hospital Medical Center five years ago, first as a volunteer for 18 months and in her current position thereafter.

Devika is a native of the Caribbean twin isles of Trinidad and Tobago where she grew up and attended school. After successfully completing seven years at the elementary level she then continued on to secondary school. While in high school she was exposed to a wide variety of disciplines but ultimately decided to focus her attention on Business Principles, Management and Spanish. Before coming to the United States she also attended the Lakshimi Girls Hindu College.

After completing her studies, she soon became a mother. Wanting to provide her children with a better way of life, she emigrated to New York and settled in Queens where she currently resides. She worked hard and was determined to continue her education.  Devika enrolled at Garden State Technical College in New Jersey where she trained as a Medical Assistant.

Devika wears many hats. She is a wife, mother of three and grandmother of two. She enjoys spending time with her family which is very important to her. In her free time she enjoys reading, and listening to music. Her favorite types of food are West Indian and Hibachi. When she goes on vacation, she likes to visit different beaches and take her children to historical places.

Devika enjoys working with her colleagues at Jamaica Hospital. She also enjoys her interactions with our patients, as this allows her friendly personality to shine. We are very fortunate to have Devika as a member of our team and look forward to many more years as one of our valued employees.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Understanding Virus Mutation

A virus is a submicroscopic parasite that is made up of genetic code: RNA or DNA, surrounded by a protective protein coat known as a capsid.

 A virus’ purpose is to create more copies of itself and spread to hosts.  However, viruses lack the ability to thrive and reproduce outside of a host body. In other words, “A virus cannot replicate alone. Viruses must infect cells and use components of the host cell to make copies of themselves. Often, they kill the host cell in the process, and cause damage to the host organism,” according to the National Human Genome Research Institute.

When a virus replicates, its genes may undergo copying errors or genetic mutations. This is a natural and normal occurrence and is especially true of viruses that contain RNA such as the coronavirus.

Over time, alterations to the virus’ surface proteins or antigens can occur through mutation. This leads to the formation of new variants of a virus strain.

It has been reported that multiple variants of the virus that causes COVID-19 are circulating.   The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) states, “Information about the characteristics of these variants is rapidly emerging. Scientists are working to learn more about how easily they spread, whether they could cause more severe illness, and whether currently authorized vaccines will protect people against them.”

The CDC is closely monitoring these variants of concern and advises people to continue to protect themselves from COVID-19 by practicing good hand hygiene, wearing a mask, social distancing and getting vaccinated.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

National Poison Prevention Week

The National Poison Prevention Week was established by the U.S. Congress  in 1961 to bring public attention to the dangers of poisoning and how to prevent it.

Each year, more than 2 million poisonings are reported to the nation’s poison control centers. The American Association of Poison Control Centers reports that 93 percent of poisonings occur in the home, 45 percent involve children under the age of six and the majority of fatal poisonings occur in older adults.

There are several ways that some poisonings can be prevented. These include keeping all chemicals out of reach from children, reading dosages and labels on all medications, and knowing how certain medications react when taken together. Here are a few basic steps to take if a poisoning takes place:

For inhaled poison get the person fresh air immediately

For skin poison take off the person’s clothes and rinse skin with fresh water for 15 – 20 minutes

For poison in the eyes, rinse the eyes out with fresh water for 15 – 20 minutes

For an overdose of medicine, call 9-1-1  immediately

In all cases of poisoning, contact the local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. Treatment advice will depend on the type of poison, the person’s age, and medical history.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Easy Corned Beef And Cabbage Recipe

Corned beef and cabbage is a dish enjoyed by many, especially on St. Patrick’s Day. Since today is St. Patrick’s Day, we thought we’d share an easy corned beef and cabbage recipe from http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/melissa-darabian/corned-beef-and-cabbage-recipe.html

Enjoy!

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

World Kidney Day

Today is recognized as World Kidney Day. This year the slogan is “Living Well with Kidney Disease” because the aim is to educate people who are affected to manage it successfully.

The kidneys are two, fist-sized organs in your lower back. They maintain overall health by serving following functions:

  • Filtering waste out of 200 liters of blood each day
  • Regulating of the body’s salt, potassium and acid content
  • Removing toxins from the body.
  • Balancing the body’s fluids
  • Releasing hormones that regulate blood pressure
  • Producing an active form of vitamin D that promotes strong, healthy bones
  • Controlling the production of red blood cells

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease and Control, some quick facts on Kidney Disease are:

  • Kidney disease is the 9th leading cause of death in the country.
  • More than 26 million Americans have kidney disease, and most don’t know it.
  • There are over 95,000 people waiting for kidney transplants.
  • Currently, more than 590,000 people have kidney failure in the U.S. today.

Often times, kidney failure can be prevented or delayed through early detection and proper treatment of underlying disease such as diabetes and high blood pressure which can slow additional damage to the kidneys.

If you are 18 years or older with diabetes, high blood pressure, cardiovascular disease or a family history of kidney disease, you should schedule an appointment with your doctor and ask that you be screened for kidney disease.

If you would like to make an appointment to have your Kidney’s checked, you can schedule an appointment at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center by calling 718-206-7001 for an appointment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

#WorkoutWednesday Exercises That Work The Entire Body

It is recommended by the U.S. Department of Health that adults get 75 to 150 minutes of exercise each week; however, many do not have the luxury of time to work out frequently and some are confined to the office for eight hours or more each day.   Despite the limitations of a busy schedule, there are ways to fit a full body exercise regimen into your daily routine.

Some examples of full body exercises are:

  • Push-ups
  • Squats
  • Burpees
  • Lunges

Exercise is essential to your health. Although your schedule may be hectic, try to find the time for a few minutes of physical activity into your daily routine.

If you would like to learn more about the how to safely implement the techniques listed above, visit https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/324895#lunges

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.