Why Does Warm Weather Increase the Frequency of Kidney Stones ?

Why do kidney stones occur more frequently during warmer weather? When the weather is warm, we are more likely to become dehydrated which increases the risk for our bodies to develop kidney stones.

We tend to sweat more in the hotter months which deplete our body of fluids; this in turn will make our urine more concentrated. Urine that is highly concentrated allows for the formation of stones made up of calcium, oxalate or uric acid. A stone can be as small as a grain of sand or as large as a pea.

When the body is dehydrated, there is also less of a flow of urine through the ureters (the tube between the kidney and the bladder) which is an important factor in moving the kidney stones through this passageway.

Kidney stones can cause a tremendous amount of pain when passing through the ureter. This pain can be felt in the lower back and groin.

Additional symptoms of kidney stones include:

  • Blood in the urine
  • Nausea
  • Fever and Chills
  • Vomiting
  • If you have had kidney stones, there is a 50 percent chance that you can develop more within the following five years. However, you can take a few precautions to lower your risk or prevent stones from developing. Ways to prevent kidney stones include:
  • Drinking at least eight to twelve glasses of water each day to dilute the urine
  • Limiting your salt intake
  • Cutting back on red meats, organ meats and shellfish
  • Drinking sugar free lemonade or limeade as the citrate will prevent stone formation
  • If you are experiencing any of the symptoms of a kidney stone, seek medical help right away. If you would like to schedule an appointment with a urologist at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center please call 718-206-7110.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Jamaica Hospital Receives Geriatric Emergency Department Accreditation

The average American is living longer now than ever before, and while this is very good news, it does require the healthcare industry to adapt to caring for a growing senior population.

Senior citizens utilize the hospital system at higher rates than non-seniors and they often require treatment for multiple chronic conditions. While seniors make contact with the healthcare system at many different points of care, the place where they most often receive their care is in the Emergency Department.

Understanding the special needs of its geriatric patients, Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Emergency Department has made many special accommodations to treat them. In recognition of their efforts, the hospital recently received a Geriatric Emergency Department Accreditation by the American College of Emergency Physicians. Jamaica Hospital is the only hospital in Queens to receive this accreditation.

“By receiving this designation, Jamaica Hospital has demonstrated a commitment to addressing the specific healthcare needs of our older patients,” stated Dr. Shi-Wen Lee, Vice Chairman of Emergency Medicine at Jamaica Hospital.

To achieve this accreditation, Jamaica Hospital had to meet many criteria, including ensuring that physician and nursing staff receive focused education in geriatric emergency medicine. This training is aimed to help providers better understand and address the complex social and physical challenges of the geriatric patient.

In addition to receiving focused education, the hospital also needed to implement geriatric emergency care policies and guidelines, ensure geriatric patients received access to specific equipment and supplies, and even make accommodations to the emergency department’s physical environment.

According to Dr. Nathan Washburn, ER attending integrally involved in the accreditation process, “The process to achieve this designation was not an easy one; it required hard work and dedication by many, but ultimately we feel that it displays a commitment to elevating the level of care we provide to our geriatric patients.”

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Bruises – Why We Get Them

A bruise is a common injury that causes the skin to become discolored. When there is bleeding beneath the surface of the skin it becomes evident as a black and blue mark. Eventually, if the person is healthy, the skin will reabsorb the blood and the black and blue mark will fade. A bruise may hurt at first but the pain subsides usually before the discoloration goes away.

 

 

Bruising occurs more frequently in:

  • Older people because their skin isn’t as thick as it once was.
  • Women because they typically have thinner skin.
  • People who exercise vigorously.
  • People who take anti-coagulating medications such as aspirin.
  • People who use topical or oral cortical steroids bruise more easily because it can make the skin thinner
  • People who use the dietary supplement ginkgo can also cause the skin to bruise more easily because it acts as a blood thinner

People who bruise easily should be checked to see if they have serious medical conditions. This would include having blood clotting issues due to taking certain medications or not having the correct amount of blood clotting proteins in the body. Bruising can also be a sign of physical abuse and this must be followed up with a physician or with the police if it is noticed and there is no explanation as to why it occurred.

Treating a bruise includes using a cold compress, elevating an extremity if it is on an arm or leg, taking acetaminophen for discomfort, and after the initial 48 hours, using a warm compress to help the flow of blood in the area.

While most bruises will resolve on their own, it is important to get medical attention if the bruise has a lot of swelling and pain or if it doesn’t start to resolve in two weeks and is still present after a month. Any bruising of the head or the eye should be followed up with a physician.

You can schedule an appointment with a physician at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center by calling 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Facts About Lyme Disease

ticks, lymedisease, hiking, outdoors

With summer in full swing, we will be spending more time participating in activities outdoors in areas such as parks, forests and hiking trails.  While getting out and keeping physically fit is strongly encouraged it is important to keep in mind that being in these areas can put you at risk for Lyme disease.

Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center offers the following information on Lyme disease, how it is spread, its symptoms, and treatment.

Lyme disease is the most common tick-born infection in New York City and in the United States.  On the east coast, Lyme disease is spread by the bite of a black-legged tick infected with the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi.  Not all black-legged ticks carry this bacterium and, even if they are infected, they must be attached for at least 36 – 48 hours after a person is bitten to transmit the disease.

Black-legged ticks are rarely found in NYC, but if you have been traveling in more rural areas of New York such as Westchester and Long Island you are at greater risk of coming into contact with an infected tick.

The annual number of cases of Lyme disease reported continues to rise each year in non-rural communities.

Some of the early warning signs of Lyme disease are:

  • Muscle aches
  • Headache
  • Fatigue
  • Fever
  • Rash

These signs and symptoms may occur anywhere from three to 30 days after being bitten.  After an infected tick bite, a widening red area may appear at the infected site that is clear in the center, forming a bullseye appearance.

The best way to avoid contracting Lyme disease is to avoid direct contact with ticks.  You can do this by avoiding wooded and brushy areas, and high grass.  If you are hiking, try to walk in the center of the trails and wear long pants and a long-sleeved shirt. If in a wooded area you should use a strong repellent (with Deet).  Dr. Klein cautions that when using any repellent, you should avoid applying the solution to your hands, eyes and mouth.

Some of the tips to find and remove ticks from your body and clothing are:

  • Perform a check of your entire body viewing under your arms, behind and in your ears, inside your navel, behind your knees, along your legs, waist and hair. Also, check your pet.
  • Take a shower soon after returning indoors. If you wash within two hours of returning indoors, the ticks are more easily found and washed off your body.
  • Once you are indoors, take your clothing and place them in the wash using hot water and then put them in the dryer on “high” for at least 10 minutes; if the clothes were washed in cold water, place them in the dryer on “high” for at least 90 minutes

If Lyme disease is left untreated, it can spread to other parts of the body causing arthritis cardiac and nervous system problems.   If you would like to make an appointment with one of the many qualified doctors specializing in Internal Medicine at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-7001 to schedule.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Is Your Kitchen Sponge Absorbing More Than Soap?

dirtysponge, bacteria, e.coli, salmonella, cleansponge

Did you know that your kitchen sponge can harbor more bacteria than your toilet bowl?  Well, it can.

As food particles in your sponge begin to decompose, the sponge may smell sour or like mildew. When there is an odor, it is a sign that a bacterium is more than likely present.

Since one single bacteria cell can become more than 8 million cells in less than 24 hours, it is safe to assume that your wet, dirty kitchen sponge may quickly become a breeding ground for E. coli, salmonella, and campylobacter bacteria, which can cause mild to serious illness.

Therefore, keeping your sponge clean is an important component to minimizing the growth of bacteria.

There are many ways to cleanse your sponge such as, placing the sponge in the microwave for one to two minutes, running it though the wash cycle in your dishwasher or soaking your sponge in white vinegar for five minutes.  Although all these methods profess to kill at least 99% of bacteria, the most effective way to kill bacteria in your sponge is with bleach.

Start by mixing ¾ cup of bleach in one gallon of water and soaking your sponge for five minutes before rinsing, studies have shown that this method of cleaning will kill 99.9% of the three bacteria strains from sponges.

Keep in mind that no matter how meticulous you are about keeping your sponges clean, you should change your sponge every two to three weeks.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Jamaica Hospital’s Patient Navigation Department

The goal of the Patient Navigation department is to act as a liaison between the MediSys Health Care System and the patient. Navigators work with providers to assist patients with chronic conditions and identify barriers to care while helping patients overcome them. As Qualified Medical Interpreters, Navigators help to eliminate the language barrier and act as cultural brokers between patients and providers. Patient Navigators receive extensive training to be able to provide health education for patients with diabetes, hypertension, asthma, lactation concerns and looking to cease smoking.

The Navigators have spearheaded many community outreach efforts throughout our MediSys clinics like highlighting Asthma Care and treatment to our patients with a series of Asthma Day events. As well as making a presence at the Farmers Market during the 2018 and 2019 seasons and at Jamaica Hospital’s End of Year Health Fair & Employee Wellness Day, these served to inform the community about smoking cessation resources, including hospital and state initiatives to help persons quit smoking and meet their health goals.

In an effort to improve our patients’ health outcomes, the Patient Navigation department is tasked with contacting our patients to assist them in scheduling and completing essential services, among other things preventative screenings (Colon, Breast & Cervical Cancer screenings, HIV tests), specialty visits (Podiatry, Ophthalmology, Gynecology), assessments (Care of Older Adults, Asthma Action Plans) lab test and wellness check-ups.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Meet Dr. Sophia Jagroop

Colonoscopy in Queens New York Jamaica Hospital would like to introduce Dr. Sophia Jagroop to the community.

Dr. Jagroop has been with Jamaica Hospital for two years and is the Director of Endoscopy.

In addition to performing many of the standard gastrointestinal procedures, such as endoscopies and colonoscopies, Dr. Jagroop’s training allows her to perform advanced endoscopic procedures.

These procedures include Endoscopic Ultrasound (EUS), a minimally invasive procedure to assess the digestive tract and surrounding organs and Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), a procedure to examine the pancreatic and bile ducts.

Dr. Jagroop is very excited to be practicing medicine at Jamaica Hospital, as she is very familiar with the community. “I grew up in the community as my father is also a doctor and his office is in Richmond Hill. I understand and can relate to the healthcare needs of the community and I’m happy to be able to offer them these advanced services that patients would have otherwise need to travel out of Queens to receive.”

Dr. Jagroop treats patients at 134-20 Jamaica Avenue. To schedule an appointment, please call 718-206-8755.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Employee Spotlight Shines on Lauren Banner, RN

This month we are proud to shine our Employee Spotlight on Lauren Banner, RN. Lauren started her career at Jamaica Hospital nine years ago as a registrar in the Emergency Department and upon completion of her nursing degree she joined the Nursing Department, where she is currently  assigned to the surgical and orthopedic unit on 3 North.

Lauren grew up in Franklin Square and graduated from Carey High School. She obtained her RN from Nassau Community College and then her BS in Nursing from the Chamberlin School of Nursing. She currently lives in Queens with her 15 month old daughter Ariella, her fiancé, and  her two year old Shitzu Yorkie mix named Harley.

Lauren has a special connection to Jamaica Hospital. Her mother Donna has worked at the hospital for many years and several of her mother’s colleagues have known her since she was a little girl. There is also another connection to nursing in her family. Her brother recently graduated from nursing school.

In her free time Lauren enjoys going out to eat, especially to Mexican and Italian restaurants, and she enjoys spending time with her family and friends. Lauren maintains a very close relationship with many of her high school friends and enjoys getting together with them as often as possible. She enjoys all kinds of music, especially oldies, hip-hop, and country.

Lauren really enjoys working at Jamaica Hospital and especially on her unit. She says that they all work together really well and that it feels like they area family. Lauren intends to stay at Jamaica Hospital for a long time and we hope she does.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Jamaica Hospital Offers Sleep Study Testing In the Comfort Of Your Home

 

It is estimated that 22 million Americans suffer from sleep apnea, with 80 percent of the cases of moderate and severe obstructive sleep apnea undiagnosed.

One of the reasons for this is the diagnosis process. Sleep studies are typically performed in a sleep lab, which requires an overnight stay. Spending a night outside the comforts of your own home and being observed by others while you sleep is enough reason for many individuals to skip having this potentially very dangerous condition diagnosed and treated.

To alleviate this concern, Jamaica Hospital now offers accurate home sleep studies to diagnose sleep apnea. To conduct a home sleep study, patients simply come to Jamaica Hospital’s Sleep Center and receive a portable, easy to use take-home sleep kit, which includes a monitor, leads, bands, pulse oximeter, and nasal cannula. Before taking the kit home, the staff at Jamaica Hospital’s Sleep Center provides a detailed orientation on how to use the device.

After conducting your sleep apnea diagnosis test in the comfort of your own home, you return the kit the next day.  The information gathered from the home kit is downloadable and the results are available within days, as opposed to the long waiting time typically associated with sleep lab studies, which is a major benefit to those who need immediate results.

Another benefit of conducting a home sleep apnea test is appointment availability. While most lab-based sleep tests involve a long waiting period to get an appointment, take home sleep kits are usually readily available. According to Ruth Mompoint, Director of Jamaica Hospital’s Sleep Lab, “The demand for home sleep studies has been so strong, we recently had to order additional kits to meet the growing demand.”

If obstructive sleep apnea is diagnosed, further lab-based studies may be required to determine the correct course of treatment.

For more information about Jamaica Hospital’s home sleep studies, please call 718-206-5916.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Heart Murmurs

heartmurmur, heartdisease, calcification, heartcondition, lubdub, swishingwhooshing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

According to the Mayo Clinic, “Heart murmurs are sounds during your heartbeat cycle made by turbulent blood in or near your heart.”

While using a stethoscope to listen to your heart, your doctor may hear a ‘swishing’ or ‘whooshing’ sound instead of the ‘lub-dub’ sound that a normal heart makes.  This slight change in the sound of your heart may mean you have a heart murmur.

Often times, murmurs can be identified at the time of birth or they may develop later in life.  Although they are harmless and do not need treatment, they may be an indication of an underlying issue with the heart such as endocarditis (an infection of the inner lining of the heart) or valve calcification (a hardening or thickening of the valves in the heart).

If you have what is referred to as a “harmless” heart murmur, you won’t experience any symptoms at all.  If it is an abnormal heart murmur caused an underlying medical condition, the symptoms are:

  • Skin that appears blue, especially on your fingertips and lips
  • Swelling or sudden weight gain
  • Shortness of breath
  • Chronic cough
  • Enlarged liver
  • Enlarged neck veins
  • Poor appetite and failure to grow normally (in infants)
  • Heavy sweating with minimal or no exertion
  • Chest pain
  • Dizziness
  • Fainting

Heart murmurs can be genetic.  Having blood relatives with a heart defect, puts you at greater risk of a murmur.  Additionally, medical conditions such as hypertension, hyperthyroidism, and pulmonary hypertension can increase your risk of a heart murmur.

In adults, a heart murmur may improve once the underlying medical condition is addressed. In children, murmurs may go away on their own as the child matures.

If you have or are at risk of getting a heart murmur and would like to speak with a cardiologist at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, call 718-206-6742 to schedule an appointment.

 

 

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.