Patient Testimonial: Patient Yvette Sweeney Tells Jamaica Hospital Team, “You Are Amazing!”

Yvette Sweeney has dealt with poor circulation and chronic cellulitis for much of her life, but her most recent experience was extremely serious. After being discharged from the hospital earlier this year, following the treatment of an infection,  Ms. Sweeney attempted to go back to work at her job at JFK Airport too soon and her situation quickly worsened.

She was taken to Jamaica Hospital’s Emergency Department with a deep abscess in her left leg, which she was at risk of losing. The thought of having her leg amputated was extremely overwhelming. “I hit rock bottom and all I could do was cry,” stated Ms. Sweeney, who added, “Thankfully the team at Jamaica Hospital kept me uplifted. No matter how nervous I got, they always kept a smile on their faces and created an extremely comforting environment for me.”

Yvette needed not one, but two surgeries to save her leg, but she still had a long road to recovery; one that she feels she could not have made it through without her outstanding care team. According to Ms. Sweetney, “I’ve been to many hospitals dealing with my condition, and I can honestly say that I have never received this level of care before. Everyone was so kind, and they all knew me by name”. She went on to add, “Everyone from the OR team, to the dietary staff went above and beyond. Jamaica Hospital is by far the best.”

Now, Ms. Sweeney, grandmother of two is back at home and improving every day. She no longer feels any pain and is even walking again. She attributes her amazing recovery to Jamaica Hospital and tells everyone she knows about her experience.

My Sweeney is very grateful for the level of care she received. “I would like to thank the kind doctors, nurses, and support team at Jamaica Hospital. You are amazing!” she said.  Her final message to her care team is “Don’t ever change and keep smiling.”

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

A Memorial Day Weekend Recipe – Crunchy Lemonade Drumsticks

Memorial Day Weekend calls for an easy to prepare, crunchy lemonade drumstick for all to enjoy. Here is a recipe from the Food Network that we recommend.

https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/food-network-kitchen/crunchy-lemonade-drumsticks-recipe-1973148

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

May is Celiac Disease Awareness Month

The month of May has been designated as National Celiac Disease Awareness Month. Celiac Disease affects one in 133 people in the United States. It is estimated that only 5% percent of the people who are affected are aware that they have it.

According to the Celiac Disease Foundation, celiac disease is defined as “a genetic autoimmune disorder where the ingestion of gluten leads to damage in the small intestine.” If left untreated, celiac disease can cause long-term health conditions such as gall bladder malfunction, infertility or miscarriage, pancreatic insufficiency, early onset osteoporosis or osteopenia as well as vitamin and mineral deficiencies.

Symptoms of celiac disease include:

  • Diarrhea
  • Fatigue
  • Headaches
  • Dermatitis
  • Bloating
  • Anxiety
  • Constipation
  • Depression
  • Delayed growth in children

Diagnosing celiac disease is performed through a blood test. If the results of the blood test come back positive, an endoscopy will be performed to give a definitive diagnosis.

In addition to having a better understanding of celiac disease, educating yourself about the changes to expect in your lifestyle will prove helpful. Some of the changes include:

  • Discarding any food that contains gluten. This means sticking to a strict diet that excludes barley, farina, oats, rye, and other known to have gluten.
  • Excluding certain items from your diet may deprive you of some nutrients. Therefore, it is recommended that you speak to your doctor about which vitamins and dietary supplements you should take.
  • Evaluating the ingredients in medications, some may have small amounts of gluten.
  • Taking care of your body by exercising and implementing more fruits and vegetables into your diet.
  • Following up with your physician or dietician as recommended. This is important as it will help to monitor your nutritional intake and check for deficiencies.

If you are experiencing symptoms of celiac disease and would like to schedule an appointment with a physician at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Employee Spotlight Shines on Karen Clemente, PA

This month, we are proud to shine our Employee Spotlight on Karen Clemente, Physician Assistant in the Jamaica Hospital Medical Center Emergency Department. She has been a member of our team for 12 years.

Karen was born in the Philippines and moved to Queens, New York at a very early age. She attended PS 115 and is a graduate of St. John’s University. She is still residing in Queens. In her free time, she enjoys taking road trips and one of her favorite places to visit is Maine. Karen also enjoys going on Fall hikes in national parks.

Karen likes different types of food, the spicier the better. She loves music of all types and feels that there is always a genre that fits every mood. Karen enjoys spending her free time with family and friends.

Working at Jamaica Hospital has been a wonderful experience for Karen. The staff works well together and there are many positive aspects to working in the Emergency Department. We look forward to having Karen continuing to work with us for many more years.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Employee Spotlight Shines on Ida Ogrenaj, RMA

This month, we are proud to shine our employee spotlight on Ida Ogrenaj, Registered Medical Assistant in the TJH Medical suite at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center.  She has been working at our hospital for the past seven years.

Ida  grew up in Albania where she attended elementary school, high school and college where she graduated with a degree as a teacher. She moved to the United States in 2010, settling in Middle Village where she still lives. She followed her passion for helping people by obtaining her Medical Assistant degree from the  Bramson ORT school in Forest Hills.

Ida has an eight year old daughter, Alessia who she is very proud of. In her free time she enjoys spending time with her family and friends. One of her favorite sports is volleyball.  She enjoys travelling and some of the countries she has visited are Greece, Italy, and Turkey. Most recently, she had the opportunity to visit a few states within the United States.

Ida enjoys many different types of cuisine,  Mediterranean, Italian, and Spanish are her favorites. She likes various types of music and her favorite singer is Celine Dion.  In her free time Ida enjoys photography, cooking and decorating. The things that are most important to her are family, friendships, peace, health and love.

Ida feels that working at Jamaica Hospital in the TJH Medical suite is a wonderful experience. She likes it because it is a great working, teaching, and learning environment. The staff is very friendly and she enjoys the diversity of the people she works with. Ida values the interactions with patients every day. She has a passion for helping people to stay healthy and looks forward to working at TJH Medical for many years in the future.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

A Springtime Recipe for Fettuccine Alfreddo and Vegetables

A beautiful, spring evening calls for a light, easy to prepare, fettuccine alfredo and spring vegetable dish to enjoy. Here is a recipe from the Food Network that we recommend.

https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/food-network-kitchen/spring-vegetable-fettuccine-alfredo-3577686

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Losing Winter Weight

During the winter months we tend to gain weight because we are usually less active and also because of excess holiday eating. Now that spring has arrived we can go outdoors and increase physical activity.

In addition to exercising, there are a few adjustments that can be made to our diets and lifestyle that can help us lose winter weight.

Some tips for losing weight include:

  • Eating high fiber foods
  • Sleeping at least 6 hours every night
  • Taking probiotics
  • Avoiding drinking alcoholic beverages
  • Avoiding sugary drinks
  • Eating more fish
  • Practicing portion control
  • Avoiding late night snacking
  • Taking walks during daylight hours to increase Vitamin D production
  • Drinking water instead of snacks
  • Practicing portion control

Before starting any type of diet, it is best to consult your physician first to discuss  what they recommend is  best for you. If you would like to schedule an appointment with a physician at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Employee Spotlight Shines On Eulanda Corales, DNP, RN, CCRN

This month, we are proud to shine our Employee Spotlight on Eulanda Corales, DNP, RN, CCRN, Clinical Nurse Manager for the NICU and Pediatric unit.

Eulanda has been at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center for 36 years. She grew up in the Philippines where she attended elementary school, high school and obtained her RN degree. She moved to  Queens in 1986 and has since obtained her Master’s degree in Nursing Administration at Adelphi University and her Doctorate degree from Chamberlain University. Eulanda now resides on Long Island.

Eulanda has two daughters who are both nurses and that she is very proud of.  Her older daughter is a NICU nurse and her younger daughter is a Pediatric Cardiothoracic ICU nurse. She also has a granddaughter who is one year and nine months old. Her granddaughter brings her much joy and she loves spending time with her. Her granddaughter’s favorite thing to do is to dance and sing, especially to Michael Buble’s version of the song “Sway” and “Save the Last Dance for Me”.

In her free time, Eulanda enjoys reading and online window shopping. She likes many types of sports, especially archery, volleyball, rock climbing, jet skiing, parasailing, standup paddling, and body paddling. Eulanda enjoys travelling and has been to many places of interest that include all of the Hawaiian Islands, California, many cities in Mexico, the Bahamas, Virginia Beach, Bahrain, Kuwait and Saudi Arabia.  She likes to go “Glamping” which is glamorous camping whenever she can. Eulanda also practices Neurobics which is aerobics for the brain.

Eulanda likes all types of food, especially, Indian, Mexican and Italian. While she enjoys many types of music, at the moment her favorite musician is the Croatian cellist Hauser. Her hobbies include photography, collecting stamps and coins from all over the world, and she also collects pens and beautiful rocks that she gives as gifts to her daughters at Christmas.

Eulanda enjoys working at Jamaica Hospital because everyone works well together as a team. She enjoys the diversity of the patients as well as the staff. She has learned many life lessons from the diversity of the people she has had the pleasure to meet over the years.  We are very happy to have Eulanda as a member of our team and look forward to her continuing to work at the hospital for many more years.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Allergic Rhinitis

A seasonal allergy, often called allergic rhinitis or hay fever, is an allergy that occurs during a specific time of the year. Seasonal allergies are most often caused by three types of pollen: grass, tree, and weed.

Seasonal allergies can have a significant impact on a patient’s quality of life and are a significant burden on the healthcare system. Approximately 600 million people are thought to be affected by rhinitis, and there is evidence showing that those numbers are on the rise.

Rhinitis is generally divided into two groups: allergic and non-allergic. Differentiating between allergic and non-allergic rhinitis is critical, as half of patients prescribed antihistamines for their reported allergic rhinitis have symptoms that are not due to allergy. Symptoms such as sleep disturbance and daily fatigue, along with inappropriate use of antihistamines, can result in impaired performance at school and work. 

It is important to use testing for allergen sensitization to help you decipher allergic from non-allergic rhinitis. These results, along with a physical exam and medical history, can ensure that patients receive appropriate treatment sooner, as well as helping to reduce avoidable antihistamine use.

To get tested, schedule an appointment with our Family Medicine Center by calling (718) 206-6942.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Can Exercise Relieve Nasal Congestion?

Mild to moderate physical exercise can temporarily relieve nasal congestion. A runny nose often occurs because of irritation in your nasal passages. This can occur due to a variety of causes, including sinus infections, airborne substances such as smoke or strong perfumes, and allergies.

Exercises such as push-ups can provide quick relief by opening your nasal passages and reducing inflammation that may be affecting them. However, this may not be the best approach in all cases.

Relieving nasal congestion through light exercise can be helpful when your symptoms are not severe and are limited to your nose, throat, or other parts of your head. However, if you’re experiencing symptoms that are worse or occurring in other parts of your body, such as a fever, fatigue, chest congestion, or muscle aches, it may be best to rest and avoid unnecessary exertion.

Additionally, physical exercise may even be a contributing factor to your nasal congestion in certain cases. If you have asthma, for example, your congestion may be a result of exercise-induced asthma, which causes your airways to constrict in response to hard physical activity.

Before exercising with nasal congestion or a cold, you should talk to an ear, nose, and throat doctor (ENT), also known as an otolaryngologist, to determine the cause of your congestion and whether physical exercise may help or harm your symptoms. An otolaryngologist can also prescribe decongestant medication or recommend alternative methods of relieving your congestion that may be safer for you, such as:

  • Using a humidifier
  • Taking a hot shower
  • Drinking more water throughout the day
  • Applying a warm compress to your face

If you’re experiencing nasal congestion, you can find an otolaryngologist at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center. To schedule an appointment, please call (718) 206-7110.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.