Alzheimer’s and Brain Awareness Month

June is Alzheimer’s and Brain Awareness Month which gives us the chance to make the public aware of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease being very important health issues.

Dementia and Alzheimer’s have profound effects on many people. There are an estimated 5 million people with the disease and 15 million people who are caring for them. It is said to be the sixth leading cause of death in the United States.

It has been said that Alzheimer’s is the only disease that can lead to death that cannot be slowed down, cured, or prevented. It acts by slowly killing brain cells which affects all of our ability to function normally.

Brain exercises may help mental functionality in areas of memory, focus, concentration and understanding.

Some suggested ways to keep our brains healthy are:

  • Getting enough sleep
  • Staying physically active
  • Eating properly
  • Not smoking
  • Challenging your mind with social interaction
  • Taking classes
  • Being aware of challenges that could lead to depression

If you would like to schedule an appointment at Flushing Hospital, please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Men’s Health Month

The month of June has been recognized as Men’s Health Month. The reason for this designation is to bring awareness of preventable health issues and to encourage early detection and treatment of diseases prevalent in men.
The leading causes of death among men are:
• Heart Disease
• Cancer
• Diabetes
• Lung Disease
• Injuries
• Stroke
• HIV/AIDS
Some of the reasons that men tend to have more serious chronic illnesses is because more men than women don’t have health insurance, men tend to have more physically demanding jobs with greater safety risks. Additionally  more men smoke than women and they also tend to  take greater risks with unsafe behavior.
Women tend to live five years longer than men and one of the reasons for this is that women usually take better care of their health. Men are often guilty of waiting until a disease has progressed to a more serious level before they seek help. There is an old adage that if a man is in a doctor’s waiting room, most likely a woman brought him there for an exam.
During the month of June, organizations across the country hold health awareness campaigns to educate men about various health issues that they may be at risk for and to encourage them to see a doctor regularly. If you would like to schedule an appointment with a doctor at Jamaica Hospital, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

June is Men’s Health Month

The month of June has been recognized as Men’s Health Month. The reason for this designation is to bring awareness of preventable health issues and to encourage early detection and treatment of diseases prevalent in men.
The leading causes of death among men are:
• Heart Disease
• Cancer
• Diabetes
• Lung Disease
• Injuries
• Stroke
• HIV/AIDS
Some of the reasons that men tend to have more serious chronic illnesses is because more men than women don’t have health insurance, men tend to have more physically demanding jobs with greater safety risks. Additionally  more men smoke than women and they also tend to  take greater risks with unsafe behavior.
Women tend to live five years longer than men and one of the reasons for this is that women usually take better care of their health. Men are often guilty of waiting until a disease has progressed to a more serious level before they seek help. There is an old adage that if a man is in a doctor’s waiting room, most likely a woman brought him there for an exam.
During the month of June, organizations across the country hold health awareness campaigns to educate men about various health issues that they may be at risk for and to encourage them to see a doctor regularly. If you would like to schedule an appointment with a doctor at Jamaica Hospital, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

June is Cataract Awareness Month

The American Academy of Ophthalmology has designated June as Cataract Awareness Month. The purpose of this designation is to help educate the public on what cataracts are and how to treat them once they are diagnosed.

Cataracts are a clouding of the lens of the eye. This will result in blurry vision, and since less light is being transmitted, objects will appear darker as well.

It is estimated that 25 million people in the United States age 40 and older will be diagnosed with a cataract, and by the time people reach the age of 80, more than half of the population of the United States will be affected with the disease.

Risk factors for developing cataracts include:

  • Age
  • Diabetes
  • Smoking
  • Prolonged exposure to sunlight
  • Obesity
  • High blood pressure
  • Hereditary factors
  • Prior eye injuries

Cataracts are classified by what causes them. Age is the biggest factor, followed by eye trauma, congenital causes and secondary to taking certain medications like steroids.

There are a few ways to lower the risk of developing cataracts, but they may not be completely successful. 

  • Wearing sunglasses when outdoors
  • A diet rich in vitamin C foods
  • Avoiding smoking

Treatment for cataracts involves a surgical procedure which removes the old lens of the eye  and replacing it with a synthetic one. It is a very common procedure and considered relatively safe. If you would like to schedule an appointment with an eye doctor at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-5900.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

What is Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder?

When people live through a traumatic event such as a war, an act of violence, a rape, a serious accident, an act of terrorism, or have been seriously threatened, they may experience  Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, also known as PTSD. This is a mental health disorder that affects approximately 3.5% of the U.S. population. PTSD is known to occur more commonly in women than men and certain ethnic groups including Latinos, African Americans and American Indians.

When people go through traumatic events they may not necessarily experience the effects immediately. It is not uncommon for the symptoms to start anywhere from a month to several years after the event.  Sometimes traumatic events that occur during childhood may not manifest until later in life.

Symptoms of PTSD can vary from person to person and are divided into four groups: Intrusive memories, avoidance, changes in emotional and physical reactions, and negative changes in thinking.

Symptoms of intrusive memories include:

  • Flashbacks
  • Nightmares
  • Severe emotional distress or physical reactions

Symptoms of avoidance include:

  • Avoiding certain places that remind you of the event
  • Avoiding talking about the event

Symptoms of changes in emotional and physical reactions include:

  • Easily frightened
  • Difficulty sleeping
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Aggressive behavior

Symptoms of negative changes in thinking include:

  • Feeling hopeless
  • Negative thoughts about the world or yourself
  • Difficulty maintain relationships
  • Sense of detachment

Long-term PTSD may lead to alcohol or substance abuse, eating disorders, thoughts of suicide or depression. Complications can also lead to poor coping skills, loss of work, loss of relationships and health complications.

Anyone who has experienced a traumatic event and has any PTSD symptoms that last more than a few weeks should seek professional care. If any of the symptoms are so severe that they may lead to physical danger, for themselves or to someone else, 911 should be called immediately. If you would like to schedule an appointment with a mental health professional at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center please call,  718-206-5575

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Jamaica Hospital Receives Diagnostic Imaging Center of Excellence Designation

Jamaica Hospital Medical Center is proud to receive Diagnostic Imaging Center of Excellence (DICOE) designation from the American College of Radiology (ACR).

To receive this elite distinction, facilities must be accredited by the ACR in all modalities they provide, and in which the ACR offers an accreditation program. Another requirement is participation in the Dose Index Registry® and General Radiology Improvement Database, as well as Image Wisely® and Image Gently® pledges. All of which are initiatives promoted by the ACR to ensure the delivery of safe, high-quality, and effective imaging care to patients.

Furthermore, facilities must demonstrate excellence at multiple levels.  Performance is measured by the successful completion of comprehensive assessments in the following areas:

  • Governance and personnel
  • Facility organization and management
  • Physical environment
  • Equipment and IT infrastructure
  • Radiation and general safety
  • Quality management
  • Policies and procedures
  • Patient rights and medical records

Jamaica Hospital has exceeded the standard requirements of accreditation to achieve DICOE designation.  Patients of the hospital can be assured they are receiving the highest levels of imaging quality, safety, and care.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Using A Mouth Guard For Sleep Apnea

America’s expanding waistline may be responsible for another growing problem in our country – sleep apnea. Approximately 18 million Americans suffer from sleep apnea and many of them are overweight or obese. In fact, the most common cause of Obstructive Sleep Apnea in adults is obesity.

Obstructive sleep apnea is a common and serious disorder in which breathing repeatedly stops for 10 seconds or more during sleep. People with this condition often have trouble staying in a deep sleep because their throats close, blocking their airways. As a result, they partially awaken to start breathing properly. They do not realize they’re waking up and may become very sleepy during the day.

Obstructive sleep apnea can lead to high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, and even death. People with sleep apnea are also at an increased risk of work and driving-related accidents, due to inadequate sleep at night.  It’s important that anyone with signs and symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea — especially loud snoring, repeated nighttime awakenings and daytime sleepiness speak with a physician.

Fortunately, sleep apnea is treatable. Trying to lose weight is the best way to help people sleep better. Recent studies have proven that weight loss can significantly improve and potentially eliminate obstructive sleep apnea symptoms in obese individuals. If, however, weight loss attempts are not successful, a common and effective treatment for sleep apnea is continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), where patients wear a mask connected to a machine that blows air.

According to WebMD, oral appliances may be an effective treatment option, such as:

  • Mandibular advancement device (MAD). The most widely used mouth device for sleep apnea, MADs look much like a mouth guard used in sports. The devices snap over the upper and lower dental arches and have metal hinges that make it possible for the lower jaw to be eased forward. Some, such as the Thornton Adjustable Positioner (TAP), allow you to control the degree of advancement.
  • Tongue retaining device. Used less commonly than MAD, this device is a splint that holds the tongue in place to keep the airway open.

These options are effective for people with mild to moderate sleep apnea, particularly those who sleep on their backs or stomachs, dental devices may improve sleep and reduce the frequency and loudness of snoring. Also, people are more likely to use their dental appliances regularly than CPAP.

These devices must be fitted by a Dentist or Orthodontist and worn in the mouth at night.

If you have been diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea and have not been helped by the CPAP, you can contact Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Dental Center to schedule a consultation with a Dentist to see if a mouth guard is a better option of treatment for you.  You can call, 718-206-6980 to schedule an appointment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

This Month We Shine Our Employee Spotlight on Jayson de Jesus

This month we are proud to shine our employee spotlight on Jayson de Jesus, a Patient Information Representative on 4 South.

Jayson has worked at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center for over 25 years. He enjoys the daily interactions he has with his colleagues, many of whom he considers to be his friends, as well as with patients and their families. Jayson is very much a “people person” and is known by everyone to be caring, kind and always willing to help. He is always interested in learning about other people’s cultures.

Jayson is originally from the Philippines, where he completed most of his education. He attended elementary school at GSCS, high school at St. Paul College and graduated from the Central Escolar University in Manila.   Jayson continued his education at St. John’s University when he first moved to Hollis, New York.  He now resides with his family in Nassau County. Jayson has been married to his wife for over 18 years and they have a son who is 17 years old and a daughter who is 5 years old. Also sharing their home are their pet birds. Spending time with his family is one of his favorite things to do.

Around the hospital Jayson is known for his skills as a DJ. He has kept every holiday party lively with his musical talent. In his free time Jayson enjoys gardening, carpentry, playing basketball, and camping. His hobbies include working on cars and collecting sneakers.

Jayson enjoys traveling and has visited over 30 of the 50 states so far, the furthest one being Hawaii. He also enjoys eating all types of food.  Jayson is very active in community activities and takes great pride in being an Assistant Scout Master with the Boy Scouts.

We are very proud to have Jayson as part of the Jamaica Hospital team and we look forward to having him with us for many more years.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Information On COVID-19 Third Dose

Since the commencement of the COVID-19 vaccine distribution, over 43% of the population in New York has been fully vaccinated. This number is rising daily as age restrictions lower for those eligible to receive the vaccine are announced.

Still, the COVID-19 vaccine continues to be questioned by many members of our community. Jamaica Hospital Medical Center is sharing the following information from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to answer them.

Some commonly asked questions that people are asking:

  • Is the vaccine safe? The vaccines that are being distributed have undergone rigorous testing and have met the safety standards set forth by the CDC and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).
  • Are there any side effects of this vaccine? The known side effects of the vaccines currently being distributed include soreness in the arm in which the vaccine was administered and some people have developed low grade fevers. Both of these only lasted less than 48 hours. There may be other side effects that we aren’t aware of yet.
  • Will the vaccine prevent me from getting COVID-19 ? This vaccine, like all other vaccines, will lessen the chances of getting the virus but is not 100 percent guaranteed to be effective for everyone.
  • How long will the vaccine be effective for? Until more time has passed and more people have been vaccinated, the CDC is not sure how long the vaccine will be effective for.

Most recently, there has been another question added which is:

Will there be a need for a third dose (booster) of the vaccine to maintain effectiveness? According to a recent CNBC report, Pfizer CEO Albert Bourla said, “People “likely” need a a booster dose within 12 months of getting fully vaccinated.

Although the “booster” vaccine is not currently available, it is hopeful that it will be available sometime this year.

Jamaica Hospital Medical Center is committed to vaccinating member of its staff and the community with the hope of vaccinating enough of the population to finally eradicate this deadly virus.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

The Benefits of Beets

Beetroot isolated on white background with clipping path, one whole beet with leaves

According to www.healthline.com. Beets are packed with essential nutrients. They are a great source of fiber, folate (vitamin B9), manganese, potassium, iron, and vitamin C. Beetroot and beetroot juice have been associated with numerous health benefits, including improved blood flow, lower blood pressure, and increased exercise performance.

If you are in the mood for a beet based citrus salad delight, try this recipe for a quick, nourishing and delicious salad. INGREDIENTS:

  • 1 bunch kale
  • 1 bunch lettuce
  • 1 kohlrabi
  • 1 beet
  • 2 carrots
  • 1 grapefruit
  • 4 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • ½ teaspoon kosher salt
  • ¼ teaspoon freshly ground pepper
  • ¼ cup sunflower seeds or pepitas

DIRECTIONS:

  1. Remove the stems from the kale and chop it into bite-sized pieces. Chop the lettuce into bite-sized pieces. Peel the kohlrabi, beet, and 2 carrots and chop them into matchsticks (julienne) with a knife or using a food processor. Remove the sections from half of the grapefruit and peel them.
  2. In a small canning jar, combine juice from the remaining half grapefruit (around ¼ cup), 4 tablespoons olive oil, 1 tablespoon honey, 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard, ½ teaspoon kosher salt, and ¼ teaspoon freshly ground pepper. Cover the jar and shake vigorously to combine (or whisk all ingredients together in a bowl).
  3. To serve, place vegetables on serving plates or in bowls. Top with grapefruit vinaigrette and sunflower seeds or pepitas.

For this and other delicious seasonal recipes visit –  www.acouplecooks.com

If you want to learn more about the nutritional value of beets, visit: https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/foods/beetroot#:~:text=Packed%20with%20essential%20nutrients%2C%20beetroots,pressure%2C%20and%20increased%20exercise%20performance.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.