Employee Spotlight Shines on Jonathan Benedek, LMSW

This month, we are proud to shine our Employee Spotlight on Jonathan Benedek, LMSW. Jonathan has been with Jamaica Hospital Medical Center for five years. He is a native of Queens and still resides in the borough. He attended elementary school at Yeshiva Tiferes Moshe in Kew Gardens, Mesivita Yesodei Yeshurun in Kew Gardens Hills for high school and Touro University where he obtained a BA in Psychology. He then received his Master’s Degree in Social Work from Touro Graduate School of Social Work.

Jonathan resides with his wife and they are expecting their first child in mid-July. In his free time he enjoys playing the piano/keyboard both for his own enjoyment and also to entertain at social events like birthday parties. He likes to cook with his wife and some of their favorite dishes to prepare are fish, pasta, chicken, and meat. Whenever he gets a chance, he enjoys a good bagel and also a nice slice of pizza. Jonathan also enjoys taking walks with his wife and engaging in religious studies.  Some of Jonathan’s favorite sports to watch and play are volleyball, tennis and soccer. He also enjoys hiking, camping, and zip lining.

Jonathan likes to travel and he has been to Florida, Rhode Island, Canada and Israel. In the future he hopes to visit places around the world that he has only visited virtually through Google Earth. Learning about other cultures is also very important to him.

Jonathan loves working at Jamaica Hospital because of his great co-workers and the diversity of the staff and the patients that they take care of. He enjoys being able to serve patients and assisting them with finding practical solutions to the challenges that they may be facing.  He feels that it is very important to treat people the way he would like to be treated.

We are very fortunate to have Jonathan as a member of our healthcare team at Jamaica Hospital and we hope that he remains with us for many more years.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Tick-Borne Diseases

With summer in full swing, we will be spending more time participating in activities outdoors in areas such as parks, forests, and hiking trails.  While getting out and keeping physically fit is strongly encouraged it is important to keep in mind that being in these areas can put you at risk for tick-borne diseases such as Lyme disease.

Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne infection in New York City and in the United States.  On the east coast, Lyme disease is spread by the bite of a black-legged tick infected with the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi.  Not all black-legged ticks carry this bacterium and, even if they are infected, they must be attached for at least 36 – 48 hours after a person is bitten to transmit the disease.

Although Lyme disease is common, it is not the only tick-borne disease to be wary of; other diseases include tularemia, babesiosis, ehrlichiosis, Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, Southern Tick-Associated Rash Illness, Tick-Borne Relapsing Fever, and anaplasmosis.

The best way to avoid contracting Lyme disease and other tick-borne diseases is to avoid direct contact with ticks.  You can do this by avoiding wooded and brushy areas, and high grass.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) also recommends the following to reduce exposure to ticks:

  • Wear a hat and light-colored clothing, including long-sleeved shirts and long pants tucked into boots or socks.
  • Use Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-registered insect repellents containing DEET, picaridin, IR3535, Oil of Lemon Eucalyptus (OLE), para-menthane-diol (PMD), or 2-undecanone
  • Check your skin and clothes for ticks
  • Remember to check your hair, underarms, and groin for ticks.

Some of the tips to find and remove ticks from your body and clothing are:

  • Take a shower soon after returning indoors. If you wash within two hours of returning indoors, the ticks are more easily found and washed off your body.
  • Once you are indoors, take your clothing and place them in the wash using hot water and then put them in the dryer on “high” for at least 10 minutes; if the clothes were washed in cold water, place them in the dryer on “high” for at least 90 minutes

If you have been bitten, please consult a doctor immediately. Tick-borne diseases that are left untreated can cause arthritis, facial palsy, and nervous system problems. To schedule an appointment with a doctor at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Learning The Facts About Aphasia

Aphasia is a neurological condition that can affect your speech, as well as your ability to write and understand both spoken and written language.

Aphasia typically occurs after a stroke or a head injury, but it can also have a gradual onset as the result of a slow-growing brain tumor or a disease that causes degenerative damage. Sometimes temporary episodes of aphasia can occur. These can be due to migraines, seizures or a transient ischemic attack (TIA). A TIA occurs when blood flow is temporarily blocked to an area of the brain.

The severity of aphasia varies depending on the cause and the extent of the brain damage.

Some of the symptoms of aphasia include:

  • Speaking in short or incomplete sentences
  • Speaking in sentences that don’t make sense
  • Substituting one word for another or one sound for another
  • Using unrecognizable words
  • Not understanding conversations
  • Writing sentences that don’t make sense

Aphasia can create numerous quality-of-life problems because communication is so much a part of your life. Communication difficulty may affect your job, relationships, and general day-to-day functionality.  Communication difficulties can also lead to feelings of shame and depression.

Once the cause has been addressed, the main treatment for aphasia is speech and language therapy. The person with aphasia relearns and practices language skills and learns to use other ways to communicate. Family members often participate in the process, helping the person communicate.

Because aphasia is often a sign of a serious problem, such as a stroke, seek emergency medical care if you suddenly develop any symptoms.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Diseases That Affect The Retina

The retina is found on the inside back wall of the eye. It is a thin layer of tissue that contains millions of light sensitive cells called rods and cones. These cells gather visual information and transmit it to the brain through the optic nerve.

Disorders of the retina can affect vision and lead to vision loss. In certain cases loss of vision can be prevented if retinal diseases are detected and treated early.

Some common types of retinal diseases include:

  • Retinal tears – occur when the gel like substance in the center of the eye shrinks and causes tugging on the retina to the point where it tears. Symptoms include seeing floaters and flashes of light.
  • Retinal detachment – occurs when fluid passes through a tear in the retina and accumulates behind the retina causing it to separate from the back wall of the eye.
  • Diabetic retinopathy – occurs in people who have diabetes. It is the condition where the tiny blood vessels in the back of the eye leak fluid causing the retina to swell. This leads to blurry vision.
  • Macular degeneration – occurs when the center of the retina begins to deteriorate causing a blind spot in the center of the visual field. There are two types of macular degeneration, wet and dry.
  • Retinitis pigmentosa – is an inherited disease and causes loss of night vision and peripheral vision.

Some common symptoms of retinal diseases include:

  • Blurry vision
  • Loss of peripheral vision
  • Loss of night vision
  • Appearance of floaters

If you are experiencing any changes in your vision it is important to see an eye doctor as quickly as possible. Depending on what the diagnosis is, there are treatment options available that may be able to help correct the condition. If you would like to schedule an appointment with an eye doctor at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-5900.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Spring Cleaning – Naturally

Springtime means spring cleaning. If you’re looking for an alternative to store bought cleaners, check out these low-cost, non-toxic, environmentally friendly cleaning solutions for a fresh smelling home:

  • Baking Soda – cleans, softens water, and scours. You can also use baking soda to deodorize food storage containers and sprinkle on your carpet to absorb smells before vacuuming.
  • White Vinegar – cuts grease, removes mildew, odors, some stains and wax build-up. Use equal parts white vinegar and water to wash both the interior and exterior of your fridge.
  • Lemons  – effective against most household bacteria. Use lemon peels in your garbage disposal to help deodorize it.

You can also try these combinations:

  • All-Purpose Cleaner: Mix 1/2 cup vinegar and 1/4 cup baking soda into 1/2 gallon (2 liters) water. Store and keep. Use for removal of water deposit stains on shower stall panels, bathroom chrome fixtures, windows, and bathroom mirrors.
  • Mold and Mildew cleaner: Use white vinegar or lemon juice full strength. Apply with a sponge or scrubby.
  • Window Cleaner: Mix 2 teaspoons of white vinegar with 1 liter warm water. Use crumpled newspaper or cotton cloth to clean. Only use the black and white newspapers, not the colored ones. Don’t clean windows if the sun is on them, or if they are warm, or streaks will show on drying.
  • Furniture Polish: For varnished wood, add a few drops of lemon oil into a 1/2 cup warm water. Mix well and spray onto a soft, slightly damp, cotton cloth.  Wipe furniture with the cloth, and finish by wiping once more using a dry soft cotton cloth.

One more tip: Whenever you clean your home, save the floor or carpet for last. Clean window blinds and shelves first and then work downwards.  This allows time for the dust to settle before vacuuming.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Jamaica Hospital Now Producing Podcasts For Our Community

Podcasts have become an increasingly popular medium to distribute information about a variety of topics. Millions of people listen to them to learn about many things including politics, entertainment, sports, and health. For this reason, Jamaica Hospital has begun producing and distributing podcasts to help members of our community learn how to better manage their health as well as how our hospital can provide valuable services to assist them.

The podcast which is named Jamaica Hospital MedTalk began production earlier this year. Each episode is approximately 15-minutes-long and features providers from various medical specialties discussing a wide range of topics. 

The podcasts can be found on multiple podcast platforms including Apple, Google, IHeart Radio, Spotify, Stitcher, and others.  In addition, those interested can listen to or download the podcasts on the hospital’s website. Episodes are also being shared on our social media platforms, including Twitter, Instagram, and YouTube.

Jamaica Hospital is dedicated to providing important information about health and wellness to our community. We are excited to utilize our podcasts as a new way to engage everyone.

To listen to any of the Jamaica Hospital podcasts, please click the link below:

https://jamaicahospital.org/podcast/

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

The COVID Antiviral Pill

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Many people have asked if there is a pill they can take to lessen the effects of COVID-19. The answer is yes, but it isn’t for everyone. The pill is manufactured by Pfizer and the brand name is Paxlovid. It has been granted authorization by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for anyone who is 12 years of age and older and weighs at least 88 pounds. The pill is only recommended for people who are at high risk for severe disease. This medication has been shown to have an 89% reduction in the risk of hospitalization in people with severe cases of COVID-19.

If your physician prescribes this medication for you, it should be taken within five days of developing symptoms and having a positive COVID-19 test. It requires you to take three pills twice a day for five days. That is a total of 30 pills.

There are some side effects of taking Paxlovid. They include:

  • Diarrhea
  • Elevated blood pressure
  • Muscle aches
  • Loss of taste

If you test positive for COVID-19, speak to your physician about being a candidate for this medication. Because it does interact with other medications that you may be taking, only a physician can determine your eligibility. To schedule an appointment with a physician at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center you can call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Community Health Needs Assessment Survey

In collaboration with hospitals across the state, the MediSys Health Network (Jamaica and Flushing Hospital Medical Center) is conducting a Community Health Needs Assessment survey to determine the most important health concerns of the community, and we would greatly appreciate your input.

The Community Health Needs Assessment survey will assist in the development of a plan that involves many community partners to improve the health of our community. The results of this survey are very important as they can also impact funding, spending, and other wide-reaching decisions about healthcare delivery systems.

The survey is open to all community members residing in New York. To access it, please click here, and share what issues matter to you most.  Please share the survey with family, friends, and others so that their input can be heard. All responses are confidential.

Thank you for your time and for helping us gain valuable insights into the needs of the community.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

World Hand Hygiene Day 2022

May 5th has been designated as World Hand Hygiene Day by the World Health Organization (WHO). The slogan for this year’s campaign is “Unite for safety: clean your hands.” This year’s theme focuses on  recognizing that we can all contribute to healthcare facility’s culture of safety and quality by cleaning our hands.

Practicing good hand hygiene helps with infection prevention and control. This is why the WHO is encouraging people to clean their hands at the right time and with the right products. Furthermore, healthcare workers at all levels and all others who visit healthcare facilities must unite by cleaning their hands, not just on World Hand Hygiene Day, but every day.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Employee Spotlight Shines on Mariah Mahadeo

This month we are proud to shine our employee spotlight on Mariah Mahadeo,  Clinical Coordinator in the TJH Department of Orthopedics.

Mariah has been with Jamaica Hospital Medical Center for three years. She grew up in Valley Stream, Long Island and attended P.S. 161, Lawrence Middle School and graduated from Lawrence High School in 2010. Mariah obtained her Associates Degree in Liberal Arts in 2016 from Nassau Community College and is currently working on her Bachelor of Science degree in Healthcare Management at the University of Phoenix.  Although Mariah grew up in a family that is in the food industry her passion has always been healthcare because she enjoys helping people.

Mariah recently got married. Her family is the most important aspect of her life. They have always supported her endeavors and encouraged her to work hard to attain her goals. Her work and her studies take up most of her time but when she does take a break, she enjoys spending time with family and friends. One of her favorite things to do with them is cooking and trying new recipes. She enjoys going out to eat as well, especially to Mexican, Italian and Asian restaurants. When she is able to get away from New York, her favorite places to vacation have warm weather and nice beaches. She has been to Trinidad which is la second home to her because this is where her family is from. Mariah has also been to Mexico and the Bahamas and one day hopes to go to Indonesia.

Mariah enjoys working at Jamaica Hospital because of the great patient caret hat is provided. She also appreciates that her colleagues make her feel like a valued member of their department.

We are very happy to have Mariah on our team and  look forward to her continuing with us for many more years.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.