What Is Brain Fog?

Brain fog is characterized as a mental fuzziness or lack of clarity.  Some of the characteristics of brain fog can include: 

  • Difficultly grasping thoughts
  • Problems finding the right words to say
  • Problems concentrating or remembering what you are doing
  • Mental exhaustion

The term “brain fog” has been associated with many medical conditions including lupus, multiple sclerosis, thyroid disease and menopause. Patients receiving chemotherapy have also reported experiencing brain fog. Most recently, the term has been mentioned as a long-term side effect of COVID-19 patients. Many of these patients, referred to as “long haulers” are currently living with this condition.

Regardless of the cause for your brain fog, Jamaica Hospital Medical Center is offering the following tips to help you manage this condition:

  • Get more sleep – Sleep deprivation can make it difficult for you to think clearly during the day. It is recommended that you receive 8-9 hours of sleep every night.
  • Exercise your body– Physical activity doesn’t only offer benefits for your body, it can also help improve memory and reaction time.
  • Exercise your brain – Regularly challenge your brain power by participating in puzzles and other activities. Also seek other enjoyable activities that will keep your brain engaged.
  • Decrease stress – Identify coping skills such as removing stressful elements in your life and saying no to requests that can cause stress. Meditation and journaling are also good techniques to help you manage stress.
  • Monitor your diet – A diet lacking in vitamins (such as B12) and minerals can lead to poor brain function. Some suggested foods to incorporate into your diet include walnuts, fatty fishes, blueberries and turmeric.
  • Check your medications – Certain migraine and anti-seizure prescriptions as well as over-the-counter sleep aid and allergy medications can have potential side-effects linked to brain fog.

If you are currently living with conditions associated with brain fog as a result of COVID-19, Jamaica Hospital has opened a Post-COVID Care Center to help you manage your long-hauler symptoms.  We incorporate a holistic approach to care for our patients, combining the best of conventional medicine and alternative therapies.

To make an appointment, please call 718-736-8204.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Home Safety Tips for Do It Yourself Projects

Many people are spending more time at home these days which provides the perfect opportunity to get household projects done. The most important thing to know before undertaking do-it-yourself, home improvement projects is how to protect yourself from danger. You can do so by following these safety tips:

  • Keep a working fire extinguisher near to you.
  • Do not overload extension cords
  • Keep a first-aid kit near to where you are working
  • It is best to work in a well-lit environment
  • Avoid having debris on the floor
  • If you are painting, keep the area well ventilated
  • Keep power tools away from children
  • Never leave power tools unattended
  • Wear protective clothing when working with hazardous materials
  • Proper placement of a ladder is very important. For every four feet of ladder height, keep one foot away from wall
  • Do not stand on top of a ladder
  • Wear protective eye gear
  • Always follow instructions included with any materials that you will be working with

By following the above recommendations you are helping to avoid any injuries. It is important to keep emergency numbers and your phone on you in case something unexpected occurs.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

How Long Can I Wear The Same Mask?

Nowadays, one of the more frequently asked questions is, “How long can I wear the same mask?”

The answer to that question varies depending on the type of mask you are wearing. 

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) the best practices for cleansing the more commonly used masks are as follows:

  • Cloth cotton – Wash you cloth mask whenever it gets dirty or at least daily in warm soapy water or in your washing machine.
  • Non-medical disposable – Single use masks should be thrown away after one wearing.
  • Face shields and goggles – Clean and disinfect reusable face shields according to the manufacturer’s instructions.  If disposable, wear it once and discard it according to the manufacturer’s instructions.

To learn more about these and other types of masks and how to care for them, visit:

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prevent-getting-sick/how-to-wash-cloth-face-coverings.html

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Keloids

When our skin is injured our body begins the healing process and produces collagen to mend the damage; this results in a scar.

However, when our bodies continue the healing process after the initial scar is formed, excess collagen is produced causing the scar to become flesh-colored, raised and larger than the original wound. This is known as a keloid.  

Keloids are most commonly found on the shoulders, chest, cheeks and earlobes. However, they can develop on other parts of the body, and you may experience the following symptoms:

  • Scars that feel soft and doughy or hard and rubbery
  • Scars that are itchy, painful or tender to the touch
  • Scars that become darker over time

Although any type of injury to the skin can lead to keloids, some people are more likely to develop them than others. At-risk individuals include:

  • Those who are African American, Asian or Latino
  • Those who are 30 years old and younger
  • Those who have a history of keloids in their family
  • Pregnant women

According to the American Academy of Dermatology Association (AAD) the risk of getting a keloid can be reduced by following these measures:

  • Wearing a pressure earring after getting ears pierced. They should be worn for at least 12 (and preferably 20) hours a day for 4 to 6 months
  • Spot testing areas of the skin before getting a tattoo or body piercing and wearing a pressure garment as soon as the skin begins to thicken
  • Informing your surgeon before surgery that your skin is prone to developing keloids. There may be a technique your surgeon can use to reduce the likelihood of keloids forming after surgery
  • Following AAD recommended tips to properly care for a wound
  • Applying silicone sheets or gels to the skin as soon as it heals

Keloids are typically not harmful to a person’s health but for some individuals, they may become a cosmetic concern. The appearance of a keloid can be improved by receiving laser therapy, pressure treatments, corticosteroid shots, surgery or by freezing the scar. It is important to follow your doctor’s recommendations after these treatments to avoid the return of a keloid.

To schedule an appointment with a dermatologist at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Talking To Your Child About Current Events

The last year has presented all of us with so much devastating news to process. While these difficult times can be challenging for adults to deal with, they can be even tougher to navigate for children.  Many parents and other child care providers may not be prepared to talk about these unprecedented recent events with their children.

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) encourages parents, teachers, child care providers, and others who work closely with children to filter information about the event and present it in a way that their child can understand, adjust to, and cope with.

No matter what age or developmental stage the child is, parents can start by asking a child what they’ve already heard. After listening to them, you should ask them what questions they have. Older children, teens, and young adults might ask more questions and may request and benefit more from additional information. No matter what age the child is however, it’s best to keep the dialogue straightforward and direct.​

In general, it is recommended to provide basic information with children so they can understand what’s going on, but avoid sharing any graphic or unnecessary details about tragic circumstances. You may need to keep young children away from repetitive graphic images and sounds that may appear on television, radio, or on-line.  You may also need to monitor your child’s internet and social media activities.

In addition to monitoring what information your child consumes, it is also suggested that you are with them as they consume it. One tip is to record news programming and plan time to watch it with your children. By doing this, you can preview and evaluate the content ahead of time and take the opportunity to pause and discuss the information being shared and even potentially skip inappropriate content.

While it is important to understand that every child, regardless of their age or abilities be spoken to, it is also important to tailor the message you deliver to your child based their comprehension level. Children as young as four years old are entitled are entitled to accurate information, but might not require as many details as school-aged children or teens.  Parents of children with developmental delays should understand that they might have specialized needs.

Signs of your child not coping well with certain current events may include problems sleeping or sudden changes in behavior including sadness, depression, or social regression. Younger children might experience separation anxiety while teens might start experiment with tobacco, alcohol, or other substances.

The most important thing to do when talking with your child is to reinforce that you are there for them and encourage them to come to you if they have any questions or concerns.  They need to know that you will make it through these difficult times together.

If you feel your child may need professional help getting through recent events, Jamaica Hospital’s Psychiatry Department offers outpatient child and adolescent services.  To make a virtual appointment with a member of our team, please call 718-206-5575.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Integrative Care Therapies That May Benefit Your Health

What is Integrative Health?

At Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, we are devoted to providing Integrative Health in Queens, New York. We created this program to help prevent disease onset, address existing chronic conditions, and promote healing in our patients. Integrative health is the coordinated delivery of evidence-based conventional medical care, complementary medicine and lifestyle modifications for producing optimal health and well-being. It combines the very best of traditional medicine with a variety of alternative treatment options as well as self-care practices to promote healing and overall wellness

What Does Integrative Health Involve?

Integrative health is an approach that places the patient at the center of a treatment plan that takes into the account the physical, emotional and social needs of that individual.

When creating a treatment plan, Integrative healthcare providers apply healthcare strategies that includes the use of alternative medicine that is supported by medical research. This concept is also referred to as evidence-based care.

Treatment plans may include the use of conventional medicine, such as prescriptions, to manage chronic health conditions, as well as alternative therapies, such as yogameditation, acupuncture and massage therapy, as well as self-care strategies to promote healing and wellness. Additionally, patients are encouraged to develop healthy behaviors that they can use on a daily basis to improve their health and prevent the development of certain diseases.

This way of practicing medicine allows our providers to deliver the right care at the right time to the right patient based on their individual needs.

How Can Integrative Health Benefit You?

Integrative health offers many advantages. As a patient you will receive individualized and holistic care that addresses your unique health needs.


An integrative approach to your health can help you to better manage symptoms of conditions that include:

  • Chronic pain
  • Fatigue
  • Joint pain
  • Anxiety and depression
  • Cancer
  • Digestive disorders
  • Sleep disorders
  • Diabetes
  • Hypertension
  • Fibromyalgia

To learn more about our integrative health program in Queens New York, please call 718-206-7849.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Cervical Health Awareness Month- The Importance of Regular Cervical Screenings

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January has been designated as Cervical Health Awareness Month by the National Cervical Cancer Coalition and the American Social Health Association.  This initiative helps raise awareness and encourages women to receive regular screenings for cervical cancer and human papillomavirus (HPV).

HPV is a major cause of cervical cancer which is one of the most common cancers found in women.  However early detection can lessen the severity of both diseases and prevent the development of abnormal or cancerous cells.

It is recommended that women receive regular screenings to check the health of their cervixes. The frequency of screenings varies by age. The following guideline is as recommended by The American Cancer Society: https://www.cancer.org/health-care-professionals/american-cancer-society-prevention-early-detection-guidelines/cervical-cancer-screening-guidelines.html

In addition to receiving screenings, it is strongly recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that women and men receive HPV vaccinations to stop the spread of the virus.

Please speak with your doctor as soon as possible about steps you can take to maintain your cervical health and remember, prevention is better than cure.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

January is National Glaucoma Awareness Month

Glaucoma is a group of eye diseases that mainly affects people who are middle aged or older, but it can affect anyone at any age. There are more than three million people in the United States and 60 million people worldwide who suffer from glaucoma.

Glaucoma is the second leading cause of blindness. Typically the disease starts to develop suddenly, often without symptoms,  and once vision is lost, it is permanent. As much as 40 percent of vision can be lost before some people even notice a problem. It usually starts with loss of peripheral vision. Glaucoma  is caused by damage to the optic nerve so that the  brain isn’t able to receive images from the eyes. There are two types of Glaucoma, Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma where pressure inside the eye increases on its own and damages the optic nerve and Secondary Glaucoma where another disease causes the pressure in the eye to increase and that results in optic nerve damage. Both types will eventually lead to blindness.

Early detection of Glaucoma can help to slow down the progression of the disease. Regular eye exams are very important. To schedule an appointment with an eye doctor at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718- 206-5900.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Make Your Mental Health a Priority This New Year

Have you included taking care of your mental health in this year’s resolutions?

Did you know that mental illness affects millions of Americans, yet many of those who need help do not receive it? There are many reasons why – it could be due to limited availability of services, or a strong distrust of others, or those who are mentally ill might have such a sense of hopelessness that they do not seek care.

While all of these are factors as to why someone doesn’t seek support, perhaps the biggest single reason is a sense of fear and shame associated with admitting help is needed. This sense of shame is very common and it is only reinforced by society, which has attached stigmas to mental illness. The beliefs the public has about mental illness lead those who need help to avoid it so they are not labeled as “crazy” and have their condition negatively affect their personal relationships and career goals.

Getting society to overcome the stigmas associated with mental illness is the key to having more individuals come forward, but unfortunately, negative attitudes and beliefs toward people who have a mental health condition are common. These stigmas can lead to obvious and direct discrimination, such as someone making a negative remark about mental illness or it may be unintentional or subtle, such as someone avoiding an individual because they assume they could be unstable, violent or dangerous due to mental illness.

Those with mental illness should never be ashamed of their condition and here are some reasons why:

  • According to the World Health Organization, one out of four people will experience mental health problems at some point in their lives.
  • Shame is pretty much guaranteed to make things worse. Feelings of shame are proven to have detrimental effects on our mental and physical health
  • Mental illness is no one’s fault. No one asks to have a mental illness and it is definitely not a choice we make.
  • We’re not ashamed when our bodies get sick, so why should we be ashamed when our minds aren’t in top form.
  • There is no normal – our minds are complex things and no single brain is the same
  • Our mental health doesn’t define us. Don’t let your mental illness become who you are, it is just one aspect of you.

It’s time to speak out against the stigmas associated with mental illness and reframe the way we see it. Getting help is not a sign of weakness. It is a sign of strength.

The COVID-19 pandemic has affected the mental health of many individuals. Jamaica Hospital advises anyone who feels they need help to get it.  Don’t let the fear of being labeled with a mental illness prevent you from seeking help.

To make an appointment at Jamaica Hospital’s Outpatient Mental Health Center, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Why You Should Get An Annual Exam

An annual exam is a good way of tracking your health progress.  Some of the benefits are:

  • Primary prevention
  • To identify risk factors for common chronic diseases
  • To detect disease that has no apparent symptoms (secondary prevention)
  • A way for the doctor to counsel people to promote healthy behavior
  • To update clinical data since your last check-up
  • To enhance the relationship between you and your doctor

If you are interested in scheduling an exam, Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center is centrally located and has convenient hours.  Call 718-206-7001 for an appointment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.