Breast Pain While Breastfeeding

It is common to experience discomfort while breastfeeding within the first few days after giving birth.  You may experience some pain, soreness, or tenderness of the breast or nipple. These problems should ease over time with proper care and breastfeeding techniques.

Continued pain or discomfort while breastfeeding is often indicative of a serious problem and should not be ignored. Pain is not a normal part of breastfeeding; therefore, you should try to investigate the cause or seek help from a lactation consultant.

One of the most common causes of nipple pain is an incorrect latch.  Check your baby’s latch to see if it is the cause of the problem. Signs of a good latch include the following:

  • The baby is positioned well against your body (The American Pregnancy Association recommends that babies be positioned tummy-to-tummy with you at all times. Babies’ heads should be tilted slightly back and their ears, shoulders, and hips in alignment)
  • The baby’s chin and nose are touching your breast
  • The baby has a large part of the lower portion of the areola in the mouth
  • The baby’s lips are turned out, like fish lips, and flat against the breast

Signs of a poor latch are:

  • Nipple pain
  • The baby is making clicking or smacking noises
  • The baby is sucking in their cheeks
  • The baby is showing signs of hunger after feeding

Additional causes for breast or nipple pain during breastfeeding are:

  • Mastitis or inflammation in the breast
  • Breast abscess
  • Clogged milk ducts
  • Engorgement
  • Thrush
  • Cracked nipples
  • Tongue-tie or the baby having a short frenulum

Breastfeeding should be enjoyable for mom and baby, and both should be comfortable. If you are experiencing breast or nipple pain, speak with an International Board Certified Lactation Consultant.  A lactation consultant can help parents and babies with breastfeeding challenges such as low milk supply, latching on, or other barriers to breastfeeding.

Making sure that you and your baby have the best start is one of our highest priorities. Breastfeeding your baby will help to provide a strong foundation for their health.  Jamaica Hospital Medical Center provides free breastfeeding/chestfeeding education classes. To learn more about or sign up for our classes, please email breastfeedingclasses@jhmc.org

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Tips for Pumping and Storing Breast Milk

There are several reasons why mothers may want to pump and store breast milk for their babies.  For some, they are returning to the workplace, for others pumping and storing milk simply offers convenience and flexibility for their busy schedules. In certain cases, pumping and storing milk helps to address supply problems. Lastly, this method can provide opportunities for dads and other family members to bond with babies by participating in feedings.

Whatever one’s reasons are for pumping and storing milk, it is important to know the fundamentals of properly and safely doing so. 

Here are a few tips to consider when pumping milk:

  • Always start by washing your hands
  • Ensure that the tools you are using to pump milk are clean to avoid the risk of bacterial contamination
  • Consider pumping in the morning, many moms produce the most milk during this time of day
  • Massage areas of your breasts that feel firm before pumping, doing so can help improve the letdown of milk
  • Relax and make yourself comfortable, stress can hinder letdown
  • Use hospital-grade breast pumps if you are not expressing milk manually
  • Keep a consistent schedule. Pump at the same times every day.  (If returning to work it is best to express your milk during the same time you would normally feed your baby. Inform your employer about the importance of keeping this schedule- exercise your pumping rights).

When storing breast milk, it is advised that you follow these tips:

  • Store breast milk in clean containers designed specifically for this purpose
  • Do not store breast milk beyond the recommended or optimal time for safe storage (It is important to note that storage guidelines may differ for premature infants)
    Room temperature (The medical definition of room temperature is a temperature of from 59° to 77°F (15° to 25°C) – no more than four hours
    Refrigerator– up to 3 days
    Freezer-up to 6 months
  • Label each container with the date that you expressed milk
  • When thawing frozen milk, it is best to do so overnight in the refrigerator or by holding the container under warm, running water.
  • Do not defrost frozen milk in the microwave, doing so can damage the composition of breast milk

Jamaica Hospital Medical Center is a designated Baby-Friendly USA facility that promotes breastfeeding. Our hospital provides several social and clinical programs designed to support pregnant and nursing mothers.   Some of our programs include breastfeeding education classes, CenteringPregnancy and breastfeeding support groups.  To learn more about our breastfeeding initiatives, please visit https://jamaicahospital.org/clinical-services/ob-gyn/baby-friendly/

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Can Breastfeeding Help Moms Lose Weight?

According to La Leche League International, when combined with maintaining a healthy diet and exercise, breastfeeding can help most moms to lose weight after childbirth.

The body requires energy to create breast milk.  On average, most women who choose to breastfeed burn an additional 300-500 calories each day than those who do not.   When compared to certain physical activities such as thirty-minute aerobic workouts, breastfeeding can burn a comparable amount of calories.

Although breastfeeding can help mothers to shed pounds, eating well-balanced meals and including physical activities in your daily routine is also strongly encouraged for healthy weight loss.

Experts at La Leche League remind women to set realistic goals as losing weight will occur gradually over time. It may take most women six to nine months, in some instances longer, to shed pounds gained during pregnancy.

The organization further advises mothers to consult with their doctor before beginning a diet or weight loss regimen. Depending on the circumstance, most doctors would recommend that new moms wait six weeks after delivery to begin a diet or weight loss routine. This time is needed to help the body to establish a good supply of milk.

Your doctor can help you to create a healthy weight loss plan that is compatible with your lifestyle and current state of health.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

If Your Baby is Not Latching On, It Could Be a Condition Called Tongue-Tie

For many mothers who choose to breastfeed, a sense of accomplishment is often gained when their baby first latches on.   Breastfeeding provides a time to nurture, comfort and build a bond with their babies.   However, if a baby is unable to latch on and breastfeed properly, mothers can develop feelings of rejection or frustration.  Before becoming distressed, lactation experts at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center are advising moms to look into the reasons why their baby is not latching on. One of those reasons may be due to a condition called ankyloglossia, otherwise known as tongue tie.

Tongue tie is a medical condition that is present at birth. It restricts the tongue’s range of motion.  This restriction is caused by an abnormally thick and short lingual frenulum (The frenulum of the tongue is the soft tissue that connects your tongue to the base of your mouth).

The degree of severity of tongue tie varies from mild cases, where the lingual frenulum loosens over time or severe cases of complete ankyloglossia where the tongue is tethered to the floor of the mouth.

Tongue tie can complicate breastfeeding because it may not allow a baby to open the mouth widely enough to latch on at the correct angle or make a good seal around the breast.

During an examination of the baby’s mouth, a lactation specialist, nurse or physician can perform an assessment to determine if an infant has tongue-tie or if the ability to feed is compromised. Depending on severity, further consultation for a simple and quick surgery may be suggested.

The surgical procedure most commonly recommended is called a frenectomy; which can be done with or without anesthesia.  A physician will examine the frenulum, then use sterile scissors or a laser to cut it free.

In an effort to promote breastfeeding, Jamaica Hospital Medical Center offers many services and resources to the community. One of the services the hospital has made available to mothers is frenectomy in an outpatient setting. Procedures are performed by our highly trained dentists, utilizing laser technology. The procedure is quick, painless and there is very little or no bleeding.  After surgery, the infant’s tongue movement should improve greatly and in most cases, breastfeeding can commence immediately.The dental clinic can be reached at 718-206-6980.

Jamaica Hospital Medical Center is pleased to announce that the hospital has received official Baby Friendly-USA® Designation.   Baby-Friendly® hospitals and birth centers are required to meet the gold standard of providing excellent maternal care and achieving optimal infant feeding outcomes, in relation to breastfeeding.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Breastfed v. Formula

Mother feeds her little daughter feeding.

Did you know that babies who are breastfed have a better chance of fighting off viruses and bacterial infections than babies who aren’t breastfed?
Well, it’s true; breast milk contains antibodies that can fight off viruses and bacteria, as well as lowering your baby’s risk of having asthma or allergies.

Some additional benefits of breastfeeding are:
• Breastfeeding strengthens a baby’s immune system
• Breastfeeding aids in digestion with less bouts of diarrhea, constipation or colic
• Breastfeeding in premature babies is an effective way to enhance health, growth and development

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends that babies be exclusively breastfed exclusively for the first six months. Beyond that, breastfeeding is encouraged until at least 12 months, or longer if both the mother and baby are willing to continue breastfeeding.

The reason healthcare professionals are promoting breastfeeding over formula is commercial formulas try to duplicate breast milk; however, they are unable to completely match breast milk’s exact composition. Breast milk is a living substance made by each mother for her individual infant.

Choosing whether to breastfeed or formula feed your baby is one of the biggest decisions a new parent will make. If would like more information about the benefits of breast feeding over formula feeding, you can speak with a Lactation Specialist at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Women’s Health Center. Call 718-291-3276 to schedule an appointment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Breastfeeding Benefits for Mommy and Baby

 

Breastfeeding

One of the first decisions you will make as a new mother is whether or not you are going to breastfeed. When you choose to breastfeed, you make an investment in your baby’s future. Your milk gives your baby the healthy start that will last a lifetime. Breastfeeding allows you to produce nourishment that is perfect for your baby.

If you are still undecided, here are JHMC’s top five reasons for choosing breastfeeding as the best form of nutrition for your baby:

  1. It provides nutrients and protection. The first milk, called colostrum, is the perfect first food for babies. Your breast milk’s antibodies help protect baby from the cold and flu and boost his ability to fight off more serious illnesses such as certain cancers like leukemia and Hodgkin’s disease.
  2. It is always ready and the right temperature. No need to decipher whether your milk is too hot or cold, simply place baby to breast for her feeding.
  3. It creates a greater bond between mother and infant. The skin-to-skin contact you both receive from breastfeeding creates a greater bond since breastfeeding releases the “bonding hormone” oxytocin. The same hormone that’s released when you hug or kiss a loved one.
  4. It provides protection for Mom as well. According to the National Cancer Institute, breastfeeding is associated with a decreased risk of breast and ovarian cancers.
  5. It lowers the risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends breastfeeding for as long as possible to reduce the risk of SIDS. A German study published in 2009 found that breastfeeding – either exclusively or partially – is associated with a lower risk of SIDS. The researchers concluded that exclusive breastfeeding at one month of age cut the risk of SIDS in half.

Jamaica Hospital Medical Center encourages and supports a mother’s decision to breastfeed. Our newest example of this is the opening of our Mother’s Nursing room located on the ground floor of the main hospital

On June 1, 2016 Jamaica Hospital Medical Center introduced their Mother’s Nursing Room for breastfeeding mothers. This new, two-station room allows women more privacy to feed their babies in a clean and spacious environment. It is the Medical Center’s policy that any employee or member of the community who needs to express breast milk or breastfeed their infant will have access to this room.

To get more information on the benefits of breastfeeding and how to breastfeed your newborn, our Lactation Consultant is available five days a week. Please call, 718-206-8645.

For more hospital events, highlights, health and  fitness tips, visit us on 

Facebook.com/JamaicaHospital and follow us on Twitter @JamaicaHospital !

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

How Your Body Makes Milk for Your Baby

breastfeeding-475378452Your breasts give you the earliest clues that you are pregnant.  When you become pregnant, they become swollen, tender and the skin on your nipples and areolas become darker. Within the first trimester you will continue to experience physical changes in your breasts-such as the bumps(Montgomery glands) surrounding your areolas  increasing in size. Milk –producing cells (alveoli) and ducts in the mammary glands will also multiply in preparation for the distribution of milk.

Usually by your fourth to sixth month of pregnancy, hormones will be released which tell your mammary glands to begin producing milk.  The alveoli draw fats, proteins and sugars from your blood to make breast milk. At this point of pregnancy, it is not unusual for your body to begin leaking milk. This form of milk is called colostrum and may be yellow or orange in color and sticky.

After the birth of your baby the body increases levels of the hormone prolactin.  This hormone releases signals to produce more milk. It is also known as the hormone that makes mothers feel maternal.

You can attempt to feed your baby soon after delivering; however some mothers are not fully capable of feeding their newborn within 24 to 48 hours after delivery. Your “first milk” will be colostrum, which will have a creamy appearance.  Colostrum is specially created for newborns; it is high in protein, low in fat and sugar and is easy to digest. It also helps your baby to make the first bowel movement and provides antibodies that strengthen the immune system.

As you can see, your body is designed to make the nutrients most essential to your baby’s health.  Breastfeeding will provide many benefits for your bundle of joy and it will also provide you with countless health, emotional and financial benefits.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Foods that promote lactation

LactationBreast feeding is a very special time in the life of a mother and her baby. It is important for mom to maintain a well-balanced diet in order in-order for both of them to get the proper nutrients needed.

Foods that are beneficial to the body during breast feeding are called lactogenic. If you are a breast feeding mother, some of the foods that are beneficial to you and the baby are:

• Oatmeal – good for relaxation and increases the production of oxytocin, a hormone responsible for the production of milk.

• Spinach – an excellent source of calcium, vitamins A. K and folic acid. It is also an excellent source of phytoestrogens, a plant based chemical that is similar to estrogen produced by the body.

• Carrots – contain phytoestrogens and also a good source of energy.

• Hummus – made from chickpeas, tahini, garlic, lemon juice and olive oil, a good source of energy.

• Papaya – has phytoestrogen and also promotes relaxation.

• Asparagus – contains phytoestrogen, fiber, folic acid, vitamins A, C, K and also tryptophan which stimulates prolactin, a hormone needed for milk production.

• Brown rice – Is a complex carbohydrate which is great for energy and also can increase serotonin level in the brain which is important for prolactin production.

• Apricots – contain fiber, vitamins A and C, potassium and calcium. Also contains tryptophan.

• Salmon – contains essential fatty acids and omega-3 fatty acid both help in the production of hormones needed for lactation.

It is very important for women who are nursing to drink plenty of water to stay hydrated. If you would like to discuss your breast feeding nutrition requirements with a lactation consultant in our Women’s Health Center, please call 718-291-3276

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Breastfeeding is Nutritious, Effective and FREE!

BreastFeeding.SickThere are many factors to consider when choosing to breast feed or formula feed your baby.

The American Pregnancy Association recommends breastfeeding for most families because breast milk provides the ideal nutrition for infants.  It is a nearly perfect mix of all the ingredients your baby will need to grow. Breast milk contains vitamins, protein, and antibodies that help your baby fight off viruses, as well as, being more easily digested than infant formula.

A mother’s milk is always the perfect temperature, does not have a preparation time and is readily available at any time and place.

There is also a great financial benefit to breastfeeding.  Formula prices can range from $54.00 to $198.00 per month depending on the brand.  The additional cost of bottles, nipples and preparation should also be factored into this expense.Breast feeding not only saves you time and money, it will give you time to relax quietly with your newborn and bond.If you have any questions about breastfeeding and would like to speak with a lactation specialist, call Jamaica Hospital’s Women’s Health Center at 718-291-3276.

 

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Should You Breast Feed When You Are Sick?

BreastFeeding.SickThere are many benefits to breast feeding, but is it harmful to your child’s health when you are sick with a cold or virus?

Even when you are sick, your baby will almost always benefit from breastfeeding. In most instances, viruses are most likely transmitted before symptoms even occur. Breast feeding can actually help protect your baby from the virus since your breast milk produces the necessary antibodies to stave off the illness. In fact, even if your baby gets sick, it is usually a much milder case than anyone else in the house.

It is not a good idea for you to stop breast feeding abruptly because your breasts can become engorged, which can lead to painful inflammation, known as mastitis. Instead, while you are sick, ask a family member to bring the baby to you to nurse and take him way when you’re done so you can rest. Also, drink plenty of fluids when you are sick so you don’t become dehydrated and your milk supply does not decrease.

Some moms may also be concerned about taking medications while breastfeeding, but with few exceptions, over the counter medications are just fine. Some suggestions include:
• Avoid using extra or maximum strength pain medication or fever reducers.

• Medications that contain ibuprofen are recommended over those that contain acetaminophen.

• Try to use single ingredient, short acting forms of cold, cough, and allergy medications.

• Avoid taking aspirin as there is a small risk of infants developing Reye’s syndrome.

It is important however to carefully read medication labels and check with your physician before taking any drug while you are nursing. If you do not have a doctor, contact Jamaica Hospital’s Women’s Health Center at 718-291-3276 to make an appointment.

For more hospital events, highlights, health and  fitness tips, visit us on Facebook.com/JamaicaHospital and follow us on Twitter @JamaicaHospital !

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.