Information About Breast Cancer

All cancers gets their name from the part of the body where the abnormal cells begin to develop. Breast cancer occurs when cells become abnormal and divide without order in the breast tissue of women, and in rare cases, men.

While it is not known what causes breast cancer, certain risk factors have been linked to the disease. A risk factor is anything that increases a person’s chance of getting a particular type of cancer. Some risk factors can be controlled (e.g., smoking) and others (e.g.,age, family history) cannot be changed. Being a woman is the main risk factor for breast cancer however, other factors such as environmental exposure and diet can also play a part.

The most common sign of breast cancer is a new lump in the breast that is painless, hard, and has irregular edges.

Some other signs or symptoms of breast cancer include:

•              swelling of a part of the breast

•              skin irritation or dimpling of the skin on the breast

•              nipple pain or scaliness of the nipple or breast skin

•              a nipple discharge that is other than breast milk

•              a lump in the underarm area

At this time, there is no known way to prevent breast cancer. However, some preventative measures such as reducing controllable risk factors and implementing early detection methods can increase your survival rate in the event of a cancer diagnoses. Reducing your incidence of risk where possible and following guidelines for self-examination and early detection are the best course of preventative action. Early detection improves the likelihood of successful treatment and saves thousands of lives each year. Each month, it is advised that women perform breast self-exams. Early detection screening exams often find cancers before they start to cause symptoms, while they are small and still confined to the breast. Between the ages of 20 and 39, women should have a clinical breast exam every year if they are in a high-risk group or every three years if they are not. From the age of 40, women should have a mammogram screening every year.

If breast cancer is suspected in a patient, a biopsy of the cells from the breast is performed, removing cells so that they can be examined. Cancer treatment includes surgical procedures such as lumpectomy, mastectomy, and non-surgical therapies such as chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and hormone therapy. If you have been given a cancer diagnosis, don’t be afraid to seek the second opinion of a breast cancer specialist for more information and treatment options.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

September is National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month

The month of September has been designated as National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month to bring attention to this very common form of cancer that affects so many men. Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed form of cancer in men and is the second leading cancer related cause of death in men. Although it is not known exactly what causes prostate cancer some risk factors for developing it are:

  •  Older age (more than 65% of prostate cancers are diagnosed in men older than 65)
  • Race (African-American men are 60% more likely to develop prostate cancer than Caucasian men)
  • Family history (having a father or brother with prostate cancer)
  • Obesity

The prostate gland is a part of the male reproductive system that produces a fluid that mixes with sperm and other fluids during ejaculation. It sits just below the bladder and is normally about the side of a walnut.

Prostate cancer, especially in its early stages, may not have any symptoms. When symptoms are present they may include difficulty starting urination, less force to the stream of urine, dribbling at the end of urination, needing to urinate frequently, urinating frequently at night, pain while urinating, blood in the urine or semen, difficulty starting or maintaining an erection, pain with ejaculation, pain or stiffness in the lower back, hips, pelvis and upper thighs, or unintended weight loss.

When screening is done there are two tests that are available. The available tests are a digital rectal exam (DRE) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test.  To perform a digital rectal exam your doctor uses a gloved finger, inserted a few inches into your rectum, to check your prostate gland.  A prostate-specific antigen test is a blood test that measures the level of PSA in your blood.  Many men who have prostate cancer have elevated levels of PSA, however PSA can also be elevated for less serious causes such as prostate enlargement or infection.

Further testing is needed to diagnose cancer. Additional tests that your doctor may recommend to diagnose cancer include an ultrasound of the prostate and a biopsy of the prostate.  A biopsy is when a small piece of the prostate is removed to look for abnormal cells.

Treatment of prostate cancer depends on many factors including your age, your overall health and the growth and spread of the cancer when it is diagnosed. Some men who have slow growing tumors may not need treatment right away and some may never need treatment.  Other types of prostate cancer are aggressive and can quickly spread to other parts of the body making treatment difficult.  Common treatment options include watchful waiting or expectant management (regular testing and checkups to assess for new signs or symptoms), radiation therapy (high-energy x-rays used to kill cancer cells), chemotherapy, surgery (having the prostate gland removed) and hormone therapy.

To schedule an appointment with a physician at Jamaica Hospital to discuss a prostate cancer screening, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month

September is National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month – an observance that coincides with the return of children to the classroom. This convergence of events leads many parents to ask one question, “how can I ensure that my child receives a nutritious diet now that they are back in school?”

Obesity rates among children have tripled over the past three decades. It’s now estimated that  approximately 18% of children living in the United States are classified as obese. It is also estimated that children who are obese are ten times more likely to become obese as adults than other children. Since most children consume half of their daily caloric intake while in school, concentrating on providing them with a healthy and balanced diet while they are there is essential in the battle against obesity.

For many parents, the decision of whether to pack lunch from home or buy lunch from school is a difficult one. Some parents question the nutritional value of school lunches. Parents who have this concern should know that in recent years, schools have implemented new standards for the nutritional value of meals to align with U.S. dietary guidelines. Processed lunches that used to be high in fat, sugar, and sodium have been replaced with meals that meet or exceed national standards. School meals now also feature a variety of fruits and vegetables, whole grains, and low or fat-free milk.

For those who still opt to pack their child’s lunch, they can improve their child’s diet and reduce their chances of becoming obese by following some simple tips:

  • Choose whole wheat breads instead of white bread when making sandwiches
  • Use fresh fruits instead of canned or processed alternatives
  • Fill a sandwich bag with something other than a sandwich. There are many other food options for your kids to snack on, such as carrots, nuts, granola, or raisins.
  • Initiate a salad day. Prepare the basics the night before and have your child choose some toppings including sliced chicken or turkey or low-fat cheese.
  • Introduce wraps as an option to a boring old sandwich. Give it extra flavor by coating with a low-fat spread and fill it with lettuce and protein.  You can cut the wrap into pinwheel slices for fun.
  • Invest in a thermos and fill it up with mac and cheese or your child’s favorite soup, stew or pasta.
  • Encourage your child to drink plenty of water instead of sugary juice boxes or soda. Sugary drinks are considered one of the leading causes of childhood obesity.

Whether your child buys or packs lunch, it’s important to stay involved. Talk to them about what food choices they made and discuss the many benefits eating a healthy diet has on both their mind and body.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Jamaica Hospital Warns Against Using Fireworks This July 4th Holiday

With July 4th holiday approaching, Jamaica Hospital  Medical Center wants everyone to know the potential dangers associated with fireworks so you can avoid injuring yourself or others.

Fireworks are ILLEGAL in New York State, and are extremely dangerous when they are not being used by a professional. They burn at extremely high temperatures and can rapidly burn through clothing and skin.  Items such as sparklers are mistakenly thought to be safe, but they are actually quite dangerous too.

In states where it is legal to purchase and operate fireworks, please be sure to follow the following safety tips:

  • Never allow young children to handle fireworks
  • Older children should use them only under the close supervision of an adult
  • Never light fireworks indoors
  • Only use them away from people, houses and flammable material
  • Do not try to re-light or handle malfunctioning fireworks
  • Soak unused fireworks in water for a few hours before discarding
  • Keep a bucket of water nearby to fully extinguish fireworks in case of fire

This year, have a safe Fourth of July and leave the firework displays to the trained professionals. If you have questions about fireworks displays and safety, you can visit The National Council on Firework Safety webpage at http://www.fireworksafety.org.  Take the test and learn just how much you know about fireworks safety.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Men’s Health Month

The month of June has been recognized as Men’s Health Month. The reason for this designation is to bring awareness of preventable health issues and to encourage early detection and treatment of diseases prevalent in men.

The leading causes of death among men are:
• Heart Disease
• Cancer
• Diabetes
• Lung Disease
• Injuries
• Stroke
• HIV/AIDS

Some of the reasons that men tend to have more serious chronic illnesses is because more men than women don’t have health insurance, men tend to have more physically demanding jobs with greater safety risks. Additionally  more men smoke than women and they also tend to  take greater risks with unsafe behavior.

Women tend to live five years longer than men and one of the reasons for this is that women usually take better care of their health. Men are often guilty of waiting until a disease has progressed to a more serious level before they seek help. There is an old adage that if a man is in a doctor’s waiting room, most likely a woman brought him there for an exam.

During the month of June, organizations across the country hold health awareness campaigns to educate men about various health issues that they may be at risk for and to encourage them to see a doctor regularly.

Jamaica Hospital Medical Center has reopened many of its healthcare services. To learn about the safety measures the hospital has taken to protect your health, please visit https://jamaicahospital.org/to-our-patients/

If you would like to schedule an appointment with a doctor at Jamaica Hospital, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Tips for Breastfeeding Babies Who are Teething

baby  514614209Most babies do not bite while breastfeeding but some might while teething. This can be painful or uncomfortable and may cause some mothers to consider weaning. Although teething raises some challenges, mothers are encouraged to continue breastfeeding as best they can. Organizations such as the World Health Organization and the American Academy of Pediatrics highly recommend breastfeeding until babies are ages one to two.

If you decide to continue breastfeeding throughout teething, following these tips can help you alleviate some pain and discomfort:
• Make certain that your baby is latched on properly. When babies are latched properly it is difficult for them to bite as their tongues are covering the lower gums or teeth.
• Massage the baby’s gums before feeding. This can decrease the level of discomfort or pain your baby may be experiencing.
• Discourage the baby each time he or she bites by either removing him from the nipple bite or by pulling him closer to you. Then calmly say “no biting”.
• Give baby something cold to chew before feeding. A chilled, age-appropriate teething toy or cloth can ease soreness. Rubbing an ice cube on gums works just as well.
• Stick a finger in the corner of the baby’s mouth as he or she clamps down. This will serve as a barrier between your nipples and baby’s teeth.

The good news is biting caused by teething is only a phase; it is temporary. Continuing to breastfeed can provide countless benefits for your baby. If your baby still bites after trying these tips, do not hesitate to contact a lactation consultant or your pediatrician for direction and support.

To schedule an appointment with a Lactation Consultant at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-291-3276.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Lung Cancer Awareness Month

Lung cancer, CT

November is recognized as Lung Cancer Awareness Month. The importance of this designation is to bring awareness to the fact that Lung Cancer is responsible for approximately 25 percent of all cancer deaths. Lung cancer takes more lives each year than colon, breast, and prostate cancers combined.

Lung cancer is a form of cancer that starts in the lungs. In the early stages there may not be any signs or symptoms. A history of smoking definitely contributes to a higher risk of being diagnosed with the disease, though non-smokers also can develop lung cancer.

Signs and Symptoms of Lung Cancer include:
• A cough that doesn’t get better
• Coughing up blood
• Shortness of breath
• Chest pain
• Wheezing
• Hoarseness
• Weight loss that isn’t intentional

It is now recommended that certain patients who are over 55 years of age and have smoked for many years consider screening for lung cancer by doing  a a low dose CAT scan of the lungs. This may detect cancers at an early stage where they may be more curable. It is important to have a conversation with your physician prior to performing a screening CT scan so that the patient understands the pros and cons of screening. For example, many scans will show small nodules (small spots in the lungs) that are not cancerous but will require follow-up and patient’s need to understand this and be prepared for this possibility.

There are several types of lung cancer based on their appearance under the microscope. These include small cell cancer and non-small cell cancer, which  is a group of cancers that includes squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, and large cell carcinoma.

Testing that can help make the diagnosis of cancer includes chest  x-rays, CT scans,  PET scans, examination of the sputum, bronchoscopy ( a test in which a fiber optic  scope is passed into the lungs), and lung biopsies (which can be done by a needle although sometimes a surgical procedure is required). Not all tests will be required for every patient.

Once the diagnosis is established it is important to determine what stage the cancer is. Factors that go into staging cancer include the size of the tumor itself location and whether it has spread to the lymph nodes in the chest or to other parts of the body such as the brain, liver, bone or adrenal glands.

To schedule an appointment with a pulmonologist at Jamaica Hospital, please call 718-206-6742.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

This October Jamaica Hospital Observes Health Literacy Month

You have just been diagnosed with a medical condition and your doctor provides you with detailed information about your condition, the cause and symptoms, as well as how to treat it. After leaving you realize that you didn’t quite understand everything that your doctor shared and you are confused about what to do next. This is a common occurrence that takes place between patients and healthcare professionals.

It has been well documented that many people face challenges when trying to comprehend the important health information being shared with them by their doctors, nurses and other healthcare professionals. Failure to understand complex medical information could affect a patient’s health.

To address this issue, the month of October has been designated Health Literacy Month.  This global observation is intended to raise awareness about this issue and encourage individuals as well as organizations in the healthcare industry to promote the importance of creating ways to share health information in a way that is understandable to our patients.

This year’s Health Literacy Month theme is “Be a Health Literacy Hero.” Jamaica Hospital is participating in this campaign by helping our patients and community improve their healthcare literacy by offering the following tips:

  • Ask questions – Then, make sure you get and understand the answers. If you don’t understand, ask the doctor or nurse for more information.
  • Repeat information back to your doctor or nurse – After your doctor or nurse gives you instructions, repeat them back in your own words.
  • Bring a pen and paper – Take the time to write instructions down so you can refer to them later.
  • Have another adult with you – This might be especially true when you expect to receive important information.
  • Ask for an interpreter – You have a right to an interpreter, at no cost to you. Tell your provider what language you prefer to communicate.

By following these tips, you can improve your health care literacy and improve your overall health.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Fall Prevention Tips

Fall Prevention Tips According to an article written in the New York Times, “Falls are the leading cause of fatal and nonfatal injuries among older adults. Every 19 minutes in this country, an older person dies from a fall.”

Jamaica Hospital Medical Center is committed to educating our community’s senior citizens on how to prevent falls. Here are some quick tips to help seniors stay safe.

Exercise

Your body needs to be active to stay healthy. The benefits of movement far outweigh the safety of inaction. Exercise ensures healthy joints, balance, endurance, and strength.

Medications

Always ask your doctor what your prescribed medications’ side effects are. If certain medications do make you dizzy, let your physician know. Be sure to read labels, check expiration dates, and follow all instructions carefully. Your diet may also affect how you feel on certain drugs. Make sure you keep a list of all the medications you are taking and bring it with you to each doctor that you visit.

Vision

Maintain your eye health by seeing an eye doctor for checkups as recommended.  Doing so can reduce your risk of developing age-related eye diseases such as cataracts. If diagnosed with cataracts, removing them may reduce your risk of falling.  Be extra cautious after having cataract surgery, as there is a chance your vision will change.

Home Safety

The four most common areas of the home where falls occur are the stairs, the bathroom, the living room, and the bedroom. Stairs should be clear of clutter and well lit. When going up and down the staircase, make sure you hold on to the banister for extra support. Grab bars should be installed near the bathtub or shower stall to prevent slipping. The living room should be well lit, clear of clutter and have wide unobstructed pathways to get around. When getting out of bed, take your time to adjust to sitting and standing slowly. Do not rush.

Ask for Help

There is no shame in asking for help from others.  When riding the bus, ask for a seat. If you need to change a lightbulb have a neighbor, friend, or family member help out. If you need a ride to get to the doctor, there are many resources available to you to do so safely. Let others know where you are and what you’re doing often, especially if you are living alone.

To receive more information on  Falls Prevention,  please visit Jamaica Hospital Trauma Department’s  Injury Prevention page https://jamaicahospital.org/clinical-services/trauma-center/injury-prevention/

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Today is World Hepatitis Day

Liver Protected Against Hepatitis Virus

In 2010 the World Health Organization ( W.H.O. ) designated July 28th as World Hepatitis Day. This serves to increase awareness about viral hepatitis and to influence change in disease prevention, testing and treatment.

Hepatitis is a virus that causes an inflammation of the liver. The liver is an organ in the body that processes nutrients, filters the blood and fights infections.

The most common forms of hepatitis are A, B, and C. Hepatitis B and C kill close to 1.4 million people each year and cause almost 80 percent of all liver cancer cases. Many people have the hepatitis virus and are unaware of it.
Symptoms of acute hepatitis B include:
• Fever
• Nausea
• Loss of appetite
• Jaundice
• Abdominal pain
• Fatigue

Hepatitis is spread from person to person through contact with bodily fluids. It is possible that people remain without symptoms for many years but during this time the disease is slowly destroying the liver. It can take many years for the symptoms to appear.

Blood tests are available that can detect the virus at an early stage.
Ways to reduce infection:
• Use only sterile equipment for injections
• Test all donated blood for hepatitis
• Practice safe sex
• Encourage people to get hepatitis B vaccine

Medication exists that can cure hepatitis C and can control hepatitis B infection. When given properly, people are less likely to die from liver cancer and cirrhosis and also are less likely to transmit the disease to others. The hepatitis B vaccine is given in three doses over a six month period and it is recommended that it be initiated right after birth if possible.

To make an appointment with a physician at Jamaica Hospital to discuss the vaccine, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.