Food Allergy Awareness Week

May 12- 18, 2024  has been designated as Food Allergy Awareness Week in an effort to raise awareness of food allergies and anaphylaxis.

According to Food Allergy Research & Education (FARE), over 33 million Americans have a serious and potentially life-threatening food allergy. This number indicates that food allergies are much more common than previously believed.

An allergic reaction occurs when the body’s immune system mistakenly identifies a food component as a hazardous substance and attacks it. The effects of food allergies may appear on the skin, in the respiratory passage, or the gastrointestinal tract. The symptoms of food allergies may vary from mild to severe, and in extreme cases, they can even be fatal.

Anaphylaxis is a very serious allergic reaction that can cause death. This type of allergic reaction requires immediate action and medical attention. You must be prepared for an emergency if you or a loved one has a severe food allergy. Learn the signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis, which can include difficulty breathing, tongue swelling, low blood pressure., dizziness, or fast heart rate.  You should create an emergency care plan in the event anaphylaxis occurs; this may include the administration of epinephrine, a life-saving drug, and calling 911 if symptoms persist.

Every year in the United States, approximately 30,000 individuals are brought to hospital emergency departments due to severe allergic reactions. Jamaica Hospital joins the effort to raise awareness about food allergies and urges everyone to learn more about this growing, yet manageable issue.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Highlights of The MediSys Health Network Cancer Center’s Ribbon-Cutting Ceremony

On Monday, April 8th, The MediSys Health Network held a very special ribbon-cutting ceremony to commemorate the opening of the network’s cancer center, located on the concourse level of Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s C building.

MediSys President and CEO, Bruce J. Flanz began the ceremony by remarking that the opening of the cancer center was a long time in the making, and how excited he was that the day had finally come.  He also thanked everyone involved in making the completion of the project a reality.

Congressman Gregory Meeks and Queensborough President Donovan Richards also joined Mr. Flanz and a room full of hospital employees. They spoke about the importance of having a comprehensive cancer center in Queens, where residents could receive high-quality care without needing to leave the borough.  The Congressman and the Borough President also praised MediSys’ leadership for continuing to understand and meet the needs of our community, both vowed to lend their support to the organization in achieving those objectives.

Also present were multiple members of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center’s (MSK) leadership, including Hospital President Shelly Anderson. During her remarks, Anderson shared how excited everyone at MSK is about the two organizations entering the next phase of an agreement to work together to provide equitable cancer care to the people of Queens.

The MediSys Health Network Cancer Center features 24 multi-purpose treatment rooms. Each of the private rooms is designed for a relaxing patient experience and includes comfortable chairs, flat-screen televisions, and soothing murals on the walls. When configuring the layout, an emphasis was placed on ensuring optimal patient/provider interaction.

While receiving treatment in the center, patients will also have access to various support services, including on-site mental health and integrative health professionals as well as nutritional counselors. In addition, patient navigators are available to guide our patients through every step of their journey. This has all been made available to ensure our patients receive everything they need for a positive outcome.

Our new cancer center is officially open and accepting patients. We invite you to take a virtual tour of our facility here: https://virtualtours.llc/projects/1147jhmc/final/index.htm

To learn more about our center or to schedule an appointment, please call (718) 206-8263.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

National Infant Immunization Week

Infants under the age of two are susceptible to a variety of serious illnesses that can significantly harm or even kill them, as their immune system is still in an early stage of development. This is why the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends a series of immunizations that can protect infants against some of the most dangerous diseases to their health.

Many parents may have concerns about vaccinating their children due to potential side effects. While mild adverse reactions are possible with many vaccines, they typically disappear on their own within a few days. Generally, the side effects most children may expect include reactions such as fever, fatigue, body aches, and swelling or tenderness around the site of the injection. More serious, long-lasting side effects are extremely rare.

Vaccines such as those given to infants only use the ingredients necessary to be safe and effective. These ingredients may often include adjuvants (commonly found in antacids and antiperspirants) and stabilizers (such as sugar or gelatin). Additionally, all vaccines go through extensive lab testing, often for years, before they are available to the general public.

The CDC recommends vaccinating children under the age of two against:

  • Hepatitis B
  • Rotavirus
  • Diphtheria, tetanus, & acellular pertussis
  • Haemophilus influenzae type b
  • Pneumococcal conjugate
  • Inactivated poliovirus
  • COVID-19
  • Influenza
  • Measles, mumps, rubella
  • Varicella
  • Hepatitis A

You can find the complete schedule of recommended vaccines for your child by age on the CDC’s website. To schedule an appointment for your child to receive the vaccines they need, you can call Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center at 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Learn The Facts About Epilepsy

Epilepsy, also referred to as a “seizure disorder,” is a chronic condition that affects the central nervous system. Those with this neurological disorder experience abnormal brain activity, which results in unpredictable and unprovoked seizures as well as other unusual behaviors, sensations, and sometimes loss of awareness.

Because epilepsy is caused by abnormal activity in the brain, seizures can affect any process the brain coordinates. Seizure signs and symptoms may include:

  • Temporary confusion
  • A staring spell
  • Uncontrollable jerking movements of the arms and legs
  • Loss of consciousness or awareness
  • Experiencing fear, anxiety, or dĂ©jĂ  vu

A person with epilepsy may experience different symptoms than others with the same disorder. In most cases, however, a person with epilepsy will tend to have the same type of seizure each time, so the symptoms will be similar from episode to episode.

While epilepsy has no identifiable cause, about half the cases can be traced to a variety of different factors, including:

  • Family history
  • Head trauma
  • Stroke
  • Infectious diseases such as meningitis encephalitis, or AIDS
  • Developmental disorders, including autism

Medications or surgery can control seizures for the majority of people with epilepsy. Some people require lifelong treatment to control seizures, but for others, the seizures eventually go away. Some children with epilepsy may outgrow the condition with age.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Jamaica Hospital Surgical Team Completes First Percutaneous AV Fistula Procedure In Queens

We are pleased to share that a Jamaica Hospital Medical Center surgical team has completed the first percutaneous AV fistula procedure in Queens.

The team led by vascular surgeon Dr. Mina Guerges utilized advanced imaging and minimally invasive techniques to achieve a successful outcome.

Percutaneous AV fistulas are performed on patients diagnosed with kidney disease or kidney failure, and require hemodialysis; a type of treatment that utilizes a dialyzer (a machine that cleans the blood).

Hemodialysis patients need safe and consistent vascular access points to complete their treatments. Traditionally,  access points are created surgically.  However,  a percutaneous AV fistula creates access using non-surgical techniques that offer several advantages  to patients including:

  • Small incisions
  • No scarring (patients are left with a small puncture site instead of a permanent scar common with surgery)
  • Reduced lifestyle interruptions
  • Shorter recovery times

Lastly, one of the most important benefits of a percutaneous AV fistula is the lowered risk of complications which can include infections and aneurysm formation.

Creating a percutaneous AV fistula requires the expertise of skillful physicians. During the procedure, vascular surgeons and radiologists utilize imaging to insert a needle and guide a tiny catheter device that helps pull the walls of a vein and artery together to create a fistula, then a special tool is used to finalize the connection and create the access point desired.

While there is no one-size-fits-all approach to creating a fistula for dialysis patients, physicians at Jamaica Hospital are proud to offer the latest technology and alternative options to common surgical procedures.

Jamaica Hospital was recently recognized for its superior outcomes in surgical care. In 2023, the hospital ranked number two in New York for surgical care according to a new analysis released by Healthgrades. The recognition serves as a testament to the hospital’s commitment to delivering advanced and high-quality healthcare to patients.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Jamaica Hospital Named One Of America’s 100 Best Hospitals

Jamaica Hospital Medical Center is pleased to announce that it has been named one of America’s 100 Best Hospitals for 2024, by Healthgrades.

The achievement places Jamaica Hospital in the top 2% of hospitals nationwide for overall clinical performance and serves as a testament to the organization’s unwavering commitment to delivering exceptional patient care.

This year, only seven hospitals in New York were recognized as one of America’s 100 Best Hospitals. Jamaica Hospital is proud to join the elite ranks of top providers and be counted as one of only two hospitals in Queens to receive the prestigious award. The hospital is also celebrating its advancement in the national rankings, having climbed up 150 spots on the list from its previous position as one of America’s 250 Best Hospitals, an accolade it consecutively earned from 2020 through 2024.

Hospitals ranked as one of America’s 100 Best Hospitals, by Healthgrades, a leading online resource for comprehensive information about physicians and hospitals, are nationally recognized for their high performance and quality achievements. To determine the top hospitals for 2024, Healthgrades evaluated risk-adjusted mortality and complication rates for more than 30 conditions and procedures at approximately 4,500 hospitals nationwide. Unlike other hospital studies, Healthgrades ratings are based solely on what matters most: patient outcomes.

“Healthgrades commends Jamaica Hospital for their leadership and continued dedication to high quality care,” said Brad Bowman, MD, Chief Medical Officer, and Head of Data Science at Healthgrades. “As one of America’s 100 Best Hospitals, Jamaica Hospital is elevating the standard for quality care nationwide and ensuring superior outcomes for the patients in their community.”

Jamaica Hospital’s pursuit of excellence and dedication to providing high-quality, equitable care has also yielded the following 2024 Healthgrades awards:

  • America’s 100 Best Hospitals for Coronary Intervention Award
  • Cranial Neurosurgery Excellence Award
  • Gastrointestinal Surgery Excellence Award

These awards have distinguished Jamaica Hospital as one of the leading healthcare organizations in the country, an achievement made possible through the tireless efforts of hospital employees to deliver the best care, and the vision of leadership to provide the community with world-class services close to home.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

What To Do When Your Baby Suddenly Stops Breastfeeding

When most people hear the words “nursing strike” the most common assumption is that it has something to do with a work stoppage by hospital caregivers, but the term can also refer to when a baby suddenly refuses to breastfeed. This response can sometimes be mistaken for weaning, but unlike a nursing strike, weaning normally takes place gradually over weeks or months.

Nursing strikes can be frightening and upsetting to both you and your baby, but they are almost always temporary. Most nursing strikes end with your baby back to breastfeeding, within a few days. In some cases the cause is a mystery, but most of the time it is due to some external factor. Some of the most common triggers for a nursing strike include:

  • An illness affecting your baby such as an ear infection or stuffy nose
  • A change in deodorant, soap, lotion, or anything that would result in you smelling different to your baby
  • Your baby is teething or experiencing sore gums
  • A temporary reduction in the milk supply
  • A change in nursing patterns
  • Your baby was frightened during a previous nursing experience

Whatever the cause, getting the baby back to the breast can sometimes be challenging. Here are some tips that can help get your baby back to breastfeeding:

  • Be patient. Don’t try to force your baby to breastfeed as it can make the situation worse.
  • Rule out any physical problems such as an ear infection, stuffy nose, teething issues, or a bladder infection.
  • Spend more skin-to-skin time together.
  • Avoid giving your baby a pacifier.
  • Attempt to nurse when your baby is either falling asleep, sound asleep, or just waking up.
  • Movement helps so try putting your baby in a sling while you walk around or try relaxing in a rocking chair.
  • Take a bath together or cuddle in a quiet, dark room.

You should continue to pump or hand express milk while your baby is refusing to nurse to prevent plugged ducts and infections.  It is also important to remain calm and understand that your baby isn’t rejecting you and while the situation can be upsetting it is only temporary and everything will go back to normal.

If your baby is experiencing a nursing strike and you have additional questions, you should speak with your doctor or a lactation consultant.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Choosing Safe Toys For Children This Holiday Season

The holiday season is the best time of the year to buy toys for children. However, parents are often overwhelmed by a larger selection, and choosing the best toy can become challenging.  The most important thing to remember when choosing toys for toddlers is picking safe and appropriate toys for their age.

Each year hospital ERs are visited by over 200,000 young children, typically under the age of three, who have incurred toy-related injuries.   These injuries can be avoided if parents keep these guidelines in mind when buying toys:

  • Carefully read warning labels
  • Do not buy toys with small and removable parts
  • Check to see if toys are on a recall list by visiting sites such as recalls.gov or cpsc.gov.
  • Avoid buying toys with parts that launch or projects
  • Do not purchase toys with sharp edges or points
  • Make certain that cords or strings are shorter than seven inches
  • Avoid buying toys that make extremely loud noises

Most toys come with warning labels that advise parents of potential choking hazards and compatibility by age group. Parents should pay close attention to these labels and do due diligence by researching toys and inspecting them for further dangers.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Meet Our Doctors: Dr. Jia Llon Yee

Jamaica Hospital Medical Center would like to introduce one of the newest members of our clinical team, Dr. Jia Llon Yee to our community.

Dr. Yee went to medical school at SUNY Downstate. He completed his residency at Temple University and returned to complete his fellowship at SUNY Downstate.

Dr.Yee joins Jamaica Hospital and the MediSys Health Network as a hematologist/oncologist for our rapidly expanding cancer care program.

“I’m very excited to be the newest member of the MediSys Health Network’s cancer care team.  We are serving a community that faces many obstacles when accessing quality healthcare. Helping provide these services to a community that needs them brings me great pride and joy, ” shared Dr. Yee.

Born and raised in Brooklyn, Dr. Yee was thrilled at the opportunity to practice at Jamaica Hospital. He explained, “I feel as if I am returning home. This is a great opportunity to reconnect to my roots.”

Dr. Yee added, “When I decided to pursue a career in medicine, I knew that I wanted to help those with cancer because I believe the relationship between an oncologist and their patients is a very special one. There are great advances in cancer care taking place and I look forward to utilizing them to help our patients and community.”

Dr.Yee treats a wide range of cancers ranging from head and neck, lung, gynecological, and those affecting the gastrointestinal (GI) tract.  Dr. Yee treats patients every Tuesday through Friday in Jamaica Hospital’s Ambulatory Care Center.

For more information about Dr Yee or to make an appointment, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Allergic Asthma Testing

Fall means back-to-school, apple picking, and … allergic asthma? If you have asthma, now is the time to determine if seasonal allergies are worsening your symptoms. So, before you head out to do all the fun fall festivities, talk with your healthcare provider to see if a blood test for allergies is right for you.

Up to 90 percent of children and 60 percent of adults with asthma suffer from allergies. Identifying your triggers and reducing exposure could help you reduce the need for medication and improve your asthma.

Together with a detailed medical history and a physical examination, an allergy blood test will help a healthcare provider develop a customized treatment plan for allergic symptoms.

Most patients with asthma are seen in the primary care setting and most primary care providers have access to specific IgE testing. And testing to help rule in or rule out allergic sensitizations (and determining what your triggers are, if allergic) is key to coming up with a plan.

Test results are used by your healthcare provider, along with medical history and physical examination, to help manage your asthma.

That management plan includes being prepared for and even predicting attacks, responding to therapies, and developing personalized asthma action plans.

Your healthcare provider will create your asthma action plan with you. You should not create a plan on your own.

Schedule an appointment with your provider to see if specific IgE testing is appropriate for you and to develop an asthma action plan.

To schedule an appointment with a Family Medicine doctor at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call (718) 206-6942.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.