ADHD In Children

ADHD In Children Does your child find it hard to pay attention?  Does your child feel the need to move constantly during times when they shouldn’t?  Do they constantly interrupt others?

All children struggle at times to pay attention, listen, follow directions, sit still, or wait their turn. But for kids with ADHD, these challenges occur more frequently.

ADHD stands for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. It is a medical condition that makes it difficult for a person to pay attention and control impulsive behaviors.

Kids with ADHD may have signs from one, two, or all three of these categories:

  • Inattentive: Kids who are inattentive (easily distracted) have trouble focusing their attention, concentrating, and staying on task. They may not listen well to directions, may miss important details, and may not finish what they start. They may seem absent-minded or forgetful and lose track of their things.
  • Hyperactive: Kids who are hyperactive are fidgety, restless, and easily bored. They may have trouble sitting still, or staying quiet when needed. They may rush through things and make careless mistakes. Without meaning to, they may act in ways that disrupt others.
  • Impulsive: Kids who are impulsive act too quickly before thinking. They often interrupt and find it hard to wait. They may do things without asking for permission, take things that aren’t theirs, or act in ways that are risky. They may have emotional reactions that seem too intense for a given situation.

It is important to keep in mind that some of these behaviors are normal in children who are very young. Displaying these signs does not always mean that a child has ADHD. However, parents are encouraged to consult their doctor, if they have concerns.

To diagnose ADHD, doctors start by assessing a child’s health, behavior, and activity. Your doctor might ask you to complete checklists about your child’s behavior and might ask you to give your child’s teacher a checklist as well.

After gathering this information, doctors diagnose ADHD if it’s clear that:

  • A child’s distractibility, hyperactivity, or impulsivity goes beyond what’s usual for their age.
  • The behaviors have been going on since the child was young.
  • Distractibility, hyperactivity, and impulsivity affect the child at school and at home.
  • A health check shows that there are no other underlying medical problems.

If your child is diagnosed with ADHD, treatment may include:

  • Medication
  • Behavior therapy
  • Parent coaching
  • School support

Parents are encouraged to work with the child’s school to create a nurturing environment, focus on the child’s strengths and positive qualities and connect with others for support and awareness.

If you have further questions about ADHD or would like to schedule an appointment with a Family Medicine physician at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718- 206-6942.

Dr. Khadiga Ahmed D.O.

 

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Heart Disease and Hot Weather

Summertime heat affects everyone, but for people who suffer from heart disease, it can be life threatening. Activities that are performed when the weather is mild may not have much risk associated with them but once the temperature rises they can lead to heat exhaustion and heat stroke. People with heart disease are very susceptible to extreme weather conditions.

When we are exposed to the heat, our bodies respond by sweating, which is the body’s way to maintain a normal temperature. . Heat as well as the body’s response to it, leads to enlarged blood vessels, lower blood pressure and higher heart rate. This combination can cause people with heart problems to serious problems due to the stress on the cardiovascular system. If the heart is already weakened it may not be able to pump blood effectively and keep the blood pressure at a high enough level. This can lead to an overheating of the body. Some medications that are prescribed for heart patients also lower the heart rate, which can be compounded during the hot weather.

Some helpful tips for people with heart disease in the hot weather are:

  • Stay out of the heat during the middle of the day
  • Wear clothing that is loose fitting and light
  • Do not perform strenuous activities in hot weather
  • Keep hydrated and avoid alcohol and caffeine.
  • Stay indoors in an air conditioned environment

Discuss with your physician ways to stay healthy during the hot summer months. If you would like to schedule an appointment with a cardiologist at Jamaica Hospital, please call 718-206-6742.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Meet Dr. Gagandeep Singh

Cardiologist in Queens New York Jamaica Hospital would like to introduce Dr. Gagandeep Singh to the community.

Dr. Singh is an Interventional Cardiologist who has been with Jamaica Hospital for two years.

He specializes in treating patients who have had or are at risk of heart attacks, heart failure, and other cardiovascular complications.

As an interventional cardiologist, Dr. Singh has advanced training in diagnosing and treating cardiovascular diseases, congenital and structural heart abnormalities by way of complex catheter-based and imaging procedures.   Dr. Singh’s expertise in performing procedures such as coronary angiograms and coronary stenting has gained him recognition as a leader in his field.

He takes great pride in being able to help patients and families take charge of their heart health and improve their overall wellness.  “I am most happy when I help my patients to successfully manage their health because I know that I am also, directly and indirectly, helping their loved ones.”

Dr. Singh is very excited about practicing at Jamaica Hospital, as he is very familiar with our community.  “I am a New Yorker; I was raised in Queens and went to school in the area.  So in many ways, taking care of this community is very personal to me.  I want to make sure that everyone is provided with very best in heart health care.”

Dr. Singh treats patients at Jamaica Hospital’s Ambulatory Care Center for an appointment, please call 718-206-7001.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Why Does Warm Weather Increase the Frequency of Kidney Stones ?

Why do kidney stones occur more frequently during warmer weather? When the weather is warm, we are more likely to become dehydrated which increases the risk for our bodies to develop kidney stones.

We tend to sweat more in the hotter months which deplete our body of fluids; this in turn will make our urine more concentrated. Urine that is highly concentrated allows for the formation of stones made up of calcium, oxalate or uric acid. A stone can be as small as a grain of sand or as large as a pea.

When the body is dehydrated, there is also less of a flow of urine through the ureters (the tube between the kidney and the bladder) which is an important factor in moving the kidney stones through this passageway.

Kidney stones can cause a tremendous amount of pain when passing through the ureter. This pain can be felt in the lower back and groin.

Additional symptoms of kidney stones include:

  • Blood in the urine
  • Nausea
  • Fever and Chills
  • Vomiting
  • If you have had kidney stones, there is a 50 percent chance that you can develop more within the following five years. However, you can take a few precautions to lower your risk or prevent stones from developing. Ways to prevent kidney stones include:
  • Drinking at least eight to twelve glasses of water each day to dilute the urine
  • Limiting your salt intake
  • Cutting back on red meats, organ meats and shellfish
  • Drinking sugar free lemonade or limeade as the citrate will prevent stone formation
  • If you are experiencing any of the symptoms of a kidney stone, seek medical help right away. If you would like to schedule an appointment with a urologist at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center please call 718-206-7110.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Jamaica Hospital Receives Geriatric Emergency Department Accreditation

The average American is living longer now than ever before, and while this is very good news, it does require the healthcare industry to adapt to caring for a growing senior population.

Senior citizens utilize the hospital system at higher rates than non-seniors and they often require treatment for multiple chronic conditions. While seniors make contact with the healthcare system at many different points of care, the place where they most often receive their care is in the Emergency Department.

Understanding the special needs of its geriatric patients, Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Emergency Department has made many special accommodations to treat them. In recognition of their efforts, the hospital recently received a Geriatric Emergency Department Accreditation by the American College of Emergency Physicians. Jamaica Hospital is the only hospital in Queens to receive this accreditation.

“By receiving this designation, Jamaica Hospital has demonstrated a commitment to addressing the specific healthcare needs of our older patients,” stated Dr. Shi-Wen Lee, Vice Chairman of Emergency Medicine at Jamaica Hospital.

To achieve this accreditation, Jamaica Hospital had to meet many criteria, including ensuring that physician and nursing staff receive focused education in geriatric emergency medicine. This training is aimed to help providers better understand and address the complex social and physical challenges of the geriatric patient.

In addition to receiving focused education, the hospital also needed to implement geriatric emergency care policies and guidelines, ensure geriatric patients received access to specific equipment and supplies, and even make accommodations to the emergency department’s physical environment.

According to Dr. Nathan Washburn, ER attending integrally involved in the accreditation process, “The process to achieve this designation was not an easy one; it required hard work and dedication by many, but ultimately we feel that it displays a commitment to elevating the level of care we provide to our geriatric patients.”

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Splinter Hemorrhages

Splinter hemorrhage  doctor Queens New York The appearance of your nails can reveal clues about your health.  Abnormalities in the shape, color or texture of nails or nail beds are sometimes indicative of underlying medical conditions.

One of the abnormalities that can occur is the appearance of small, dark-red or brown blood vessels that resemble splinters under your nails. These visible blood vessels are known as splinter hemorrhages.

Splinter hemorrhages can develop as a result of trauma or injury to the nail.  However, in instances where trauma is not involved, the appearance of blood vessels under the nail could signal the development of serious health issues.

Some medical conditions that can cause splinter hemorrhages to appear include:

  • Endocarditis- An infection of the heart valves and chambers
  • Vasculitis – Damage or swelling of the blood vessels
  • Scleroderma- An  autoimmune disease that causes hardening and tightening of the skin and connective tissues
  • Peptic ulcer disease- A condition in which painful sores or ulcers develop  in the lining of the stomach or parts of  the small intestine
  • Psoriasis – An inflammatory disease characterized by a buildup of excess skin cells that result in scales and red patches on the skin
  • Raynaud’s disease- A rare disorder of the blood vessels that causes them to constrict excessively in response to cold

Splinter hemorrhages can also appear as a result of taking certain medications such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

If splinter hemorrhages form after receiving trauma or injury to the nails, there is usually no need to see a doctor- unless the hemorrhages do not go away on their own.  (Splinter hemorrhages typically take 3-4 months to disappear).   You should see a doctor immediately if splinter hemorrhages appear without trauma or injury.  Your doctor will order a series of tests to isolate a possible cause.

To schedule an appointment with a doctor at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please  718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Signs and Symptoms Of A Blood Clot

Signs and Symptoms of a blood clot-vascular doctor in Queens

According to the American Society of Hematology, “Blood clotting is an important process that prevents, excessive bleeding when a blood vessel is injured.” Typically,  once injuries have healed,  our bodies naturally dissolve clots- allowing blood vessels to function normally when transporting blood.

However, there are instances in which blood clots do not form as a result of injury and do not dissolve on their own.  Blood clots may also form as a result of complications caused by obesity, pregnancy, prolonged sitting, smoking, certain medications or diseases.  When clots do not dissolve they can lead to serious health issues such as stroke or heart attack.

Knowing the signs and symptoms of a blood clot can help you to recognize a potential threat to your health and seek treatment in a timely manner. Signs and symptoms include:

  • Swelling
  • Change in color in arms or legs
  • Pain in chest, arms or legs
  • Lower leg cramps
  • A warm spot on the leg
  • Trouble breathing
  • Coughing up blood
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • High blood pressure
  • Blood in urine
  • Fever
  • Light-headedness
  • Headache
  • Speech or vision difficulties

If you are experiencing these symptoms, seek medical attention right away.  This may save your life or reduce the severity of certain complications. Treatment is determined by the location of the blood clot and may include surgery or medication (anticoagulants or thrombolytics).

To schedule a visit with a doctor at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-7001

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Bruises – Why We Get Them

A bruise is a common injury that causes the skin to become discolored. When there is bleeding beneath the surface of the skin it becomes evident as a black and blue mark. Eventually, if the person is healthy, the skin will reabsorb the blood and the black and blue mark will fade. A bruise may hurt at first but the pain subsides usually before the discoloration goes away.

 

 

Bruising occurs more frequently in:

  • Older people because their skin isn’t as thick as it once was.
  • Women because they typically have thinner skin.
  • People who exercise vigorously.
  • People who take anti-coagulating medications such as aspirin.
  • People who use topical or oral cortical steroids bruise more easily because it can make the skin thinner
  • People who use the dietary supplement ginkgo can also cause the skin to bruise more easily because it acts as a blood thinner

People who bruise easily should be checked to see if they have serious medical conditions. This would include having blood clotting issues due to taking certain medications or not having the correct amount of blood clotting proteins in the body. Bruising can also be a sign of physical abuse and this must be followed up with a physician or with the police if it is noticed and there is no explanation as to why it occurred.

Treating a bruise includes using a cold compress, elevating an extremity if it is on an arm or leg, taking acetaminophen for discomfort, and after the initial 48 hours, using a warm compress to help the flow of blood in the area.

While most bruises will resolve on their own, it is important to get medical attention if the bruise has a lot of swelling and pain or if it doesn’t start to resolve in two weeks and is still present after a month. Any bruising of the head or the eye should be followed up with a physician.

You can schedule an appointment with a physician at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center by calling 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Facts About Lyme Disease

ticks, lymedisease, hiking, outdoors

With summer in full swing, we will be spending more time participating in activities outdoors in areas such as parks, forests and hiking trails.  While getting out and keeping physically fit is strongly encouraged it is important to keep in mind that being in these areas can put you at risk for Lyme disease.

Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center offers the following information on Lyme disease, how it is spread, its symptoms, and treatment.

Lyme disease is the most common tick-born infection in New York City and in the United States.  On the east coast, Lyme disease is spread by the bite of a black-legged tick infected with the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi.  Not all black-legged ticks carry this bacterium and, even if they are infected, they must be attached for at least 36 – 48 hours after a person is bitten to transmit the disease.

Black-legged ticks are rarely found in NYC, but if you have been traveling in more rural areas of New York such as Westchester and Long Island you are at greater risk of coming into contact with an infected tick.

The annual number of cases of Lyme disease reported continues to rise each year in non-rural communities.

Some of the early warning signs of Lyme disease are:

  • Muscle aches
  • Headache
  • Fatigue
  • Fever
  • Rash

These signs and symptoms may occur anywhere from three to 30 days after being bitten.  After an infected tick bite, a widening red area may appear at the infected site that is clear in the center, forming a bullseye appearance.

The best way to avoid contracting Lyme disease is to avoid direct contact with ticks.  You can do this by avoiding wooded and brushy areas, and high grass.  If you are hiking, try to walk in the center of the trails and wear long pants and a long-sleeved shirt. If in a wooded area you should use a strong repellent (with Deet).  Dr. Klein cautions that when using any repellent, you should avoid applying the solution to your hands, eyes and mouth.

Some of the tips to find and remove ticks from your body and clothing are:

  • Perform a check of your entire body viewing under your arms, behind and in your ears, inside your navel, behind your knees, along your legs, waist and hair. Also, check your pet.
  • Take a shower soon after returning indoors. If you wash within two hours of returning indoors, the ticks are more easily found and washed off your body.
  • Once you are indoors, take your clothing and place them in the wash using hot water and then put them in the dryer on “high” for at least 10 minutes; if the clothes were washed in cold water, place them in the dryer on “high” for at least 90 minutes

If Lyme disease is left untreated, it can spread to other parts of the body causing arthritis cardiac and nervous system problems.   If you would like to make an appointment with one of the many qualified doctors specializing in Internal Medicine at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-7001 to schedule.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Is Your Kitchen Sponge Absorbing More Than Soap?

dirtysponge, bacteria, e.coli, salmonella, cleansponge

Did you know that your kitchen sponge can harbor more bacteria than your toilet bowl?  Well, it can.

As food particles in your sponge begin to decompose, the sponge may smell sour or like mildew. When there is an odor, it is a sign that a bacterium is more than likely present.

Since one single bacteria cell can become more than 8 million cells in less than 24 hours, it is safe to assume that your wet, dirty kitchen sponge may quickly become a breeding ground for E. coli, salmonella, and campylobacter bacteria, which can cause mild to serious illness.

Therefore, keeping your sponge clean is an important component to minimizing the growth of bacteria.

There are many ways to cleanse your sponge such as, placing the sponge in the microwave for one to two minutes, running it though the wash cycle in your dishwasher or soaking your sponge in white vinegar for five minutes.  Although all these methods profess to kill at least 99% of bacteria, the most effective way to kill bacteria in your sponge is with bleach.

Start by mixing ¾ cup of bleach in one gallon of water and soaking your sponge for five minutes before rinsing, studies have shown that this method of cleaning will kill 99.9% of the three bacteria strains from sponges.

Keep in mind that no matter how meticulous you are about keeping your sponges clean, you should change your sponge every two to three weeks.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.