A Great Summer Salad Dressing!

                                                                                   

The summer time is great for grilling and salads but we often forget about the dressing. Why store buy?  Here is a great recipe, courtesy of the Food Network, for a salad dressing with ingredients from home to make it even more convenient:

 

Lemon Balsamic Dressing:                                                                     

Whisk 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar, 1 tablespoon lemon juice, 2 teaspoons dijon mustard, 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt, and pepper to taste. Gradually whisk in 1/2 cup olive oil.

For more easy to make dressings, check out http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/articles/50-salad-dressing-recipes.page-2.html

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Electronic Cigarettes – are they safe ?

e cigs 465449923Electronic cigarettes, or as they are more popularly called, e-cigarettes, are designed to look like traditional tobacco cigarettes. Though the e-cigarettes contain no tobacco, they can be harmful because they contain nicotine which is a cancer causing chemical. Their manufacturers would like the public to believe that they are a safer alternative to cigarettes, but this may not be the case.

How they work – The user inhales through a mouthpiece similar to traditional cigarettes. This flow of air triggers a sensor that turns on a small battery operated heater. The heater warms up a capsule that contains nicotine and propylene glycol. The vapor that is created gives the user the sensation of smoking a traditional cigarette. The vapor from these e-cigarettes also contains formaldehyde and acetaldehyde which can also cause cancer.

The U. S. Food and Drug Administration has done a preliminary analysis of these devices and concluded that the vapors that they emit contain other carcinogens, such as  nitrosamines and diethylene glycol. It is presumed that the effects of smoking these e-cigarettes would have similar second hand effects as regular tobacco products and their use should be regulated in a similar manner.

Though they have been marketed as an aid to stop smoking for those trying to quit, there is no evidence that proves that these e-cigarettes accomplish that goal.. If you smoke, or know someone who does, and are interested in quitting we recommend speaking with your physician or joining our Freedom From Smoking program.

Jamaica Hospital’s smoking cessation team wants to help you develop a plan leading to your “quit day”. Our Medical Home Department has partnered with the American Lung Association to bring you Freedom from Smoking, a comprehensive and successful group-based smoking cessation program.For more information or to register, call: 718 206 8494

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All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Butter on Burns? Does it Really Work?

You may want to think twice about putting butter on your burn. Although, it’s a popular folk remedy you’ve probably heard countless times before, there’s no evidence that it works. In fact, putting butter on your burn can cause an infection and prolong the healing process.

Butter does not have any of the properties needed to treat a minor burn— it’s not a cleanser (antiseptic), it doesn’t fight infection (antibiotic), nor does it provide pain relief (analgesic).

To effectively treat a minor burn, physicians recommend that you cool the burn by running it under cool water until the pain subsides or placing a cool cloth over the burn. Do not use ice, however. Next, clean the burn with soap and water, making sure you don’t break any blisters. After it’s clean, put a thin layer of ointment on it, such as petroleum or aloe vera, and lastly, cover it with a gauze bandage. If needed, take an over-the-counter- pain reliever.

If you want to use a household item out of the pantry for your burn—try honey instead. Research has shown that honey has several healing properties.

If your burn, however, is from a fire, electrical wire, or chemicals, or larger than two inches, you should seek medical attention.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Why Dark Chocolate, In Moderation, Can Be Beneficial

 

 

 

 

 

Dark Chocolate has gotten a lot of attention because it’s believed to help protect your cardiovascular system. The reason being is that the cocoa bean is rich in a class of plant nutrients called flavanoids.

It has been proven that flavonoids help protect plants from environmental toxins, help repair damage and can be found in a variety of foods, such as fruits and veggies. Foods which contain flavanoids, can be beneficial because of their antioxidant power. 

Flavanoids are the main type of flavonoid found in cocoa and chocolate. In addition to having antioxidant qualities, research shows that flavanols have other potential influences on vascular health, such as lowering blood pressure, improving blood flow to the brain and heart, and making blood platelets less sticky and able to clot.

Are all types of chocolate healthy?

It’s important to understand that not all forms of chocolate contain high levels of flavanols.Cocoa naturally has a very strong, pungent taste, which comes from the flavanols. When cocoa is processed into your favorite chocolate products, it goes through several steps to reduce this taste. The more chocolate is processed the more flavanols are lost.

Be careful about the type of dark chocolate you choose: chewy caramel-marshmallow-nut-covered dark chocolate is by no means a heart-healthy food option. Watch out for those extra ingredients that can add lots of extra fat and calories. Second, there is currently no established serving size of chocolate to help you reap the cardiovascular benefits it may offer, and more research is needed in this area. However, we do know that you no longer need to feel guilty if you enjoy a small piece of dark chocolate once in a while.

So, for now, enjoy moderate portions of chocolate (e.g., 1 ounce) a few times per week, and don’t forget to eat other flavonoid-rich foods.

 

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Is your Erectile Dysfunction Just a Symptom?

                                                                 

Erectile dysfunction, sometimes referred to as impotence, occurs when a man can no longer maintain an erection firm enough for sexual intercourse. Having erectile trouble, from time to time, isn’t necessarily a cause for concern.

Having erectile dysfunction symptoms may cause stress, cause relationship problems, affect your self-confidence, and reduce your sexual desire.

A family doctor is a good place to start when you have erectile problems. See your doctor if:

  • Erectile or other sexual problems are an issue for you or your partner
  • You have diabetes, heart disease or another known health condition that may be linked to erectile dysfunction

Even though it may seem awkward to speak with your doctor about erectile dysfunction, go in for an evaluation. If problems achieving or maintaining an erection are due to an underlying health condition, addressing the problem may be enough to reverse your erectile dysfunction.

If treating an underlying condition doesn’t help, medications or other direct treatments may work.

For more information, or to schedule an appointment, please call our Department of Urology at 718-206-7110.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

The Relationship Between Obesity and Sleep Disorders

America’s expanding waistline may be responsible for another growing problem in our country – sleep apnea. Approximately 18 million Americans suffer from sleep apnea and many of them are overweight or obese. In fact, the most common cause of Obstructive Sleep Apnea in adults is obesity.

Obstructive sleep apnea is a common and serious disorder in which breathing repeatedly stops for 10 seconds or more during sleep. People with this condition often have trouble staying in a deep sleep because their throats close, blocking their airways. As a result, they partially awaken to start breathing properly. They don’t realize they’re waking up and may become very sleepy during the day.

Obstructive sleep apnea can lead to high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, and even death. People with sleep apnea are also at an increased risk of work and driving-related accidents, due to inadequate sleep at night.  It’s important that anyone with signs and symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea — especially loud snoring, repeated nighttime awakenings and daytime sleepiness speak with a physician.

Fortunately, sleep apnea is treatable. Making an effort to lose weight is the best way to help people sleep better. Recent studies have proven that weight loss can significantly improve and potentially eliminate obstructive sleep apnea symptoms in obese individuals. If, however, weight loss attempts are not successful, a common and effective treatment for sleep apnea is continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), where patients wear a mask connected to a machine that blows air into the throat, keeping it open while they sleep at night.

If you believe that you have sleep apnea, it is imperative that you get tested. Speak with your doctor and request a referral to a sleep center so experts can perform an overnight sleep study. Jamaica Hospital operates a three-bed, fully private, sleep center. For more information, please call 718-206-5916.

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All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

The Origin of Aspirin

Taking an aspirin to relieve minor aches and pains has become so commonplace, we don’t even give it a second thought. Have a headache, take an aspirin, have a backache, take an aspirin, a little fever, an aspirin will help with that. It provides relief and for many people, that is all that matters.

Aspirin, the generic term for acetylsalicyclic acid, has been widely used for over 100 years. It is derived from the compound called salicin which comes from the bark of the willow plant. Historically, the pain relieving effects of salicin have been known for thousands of years, having been described by Hippocrates in some of his writings.

In the early 1800’s, scientists in Europewere working with the extract derived from the willow tree to help provide pain relief. While the impure crystal form of this compound helped to relieve pain, it was so strong that it had very bad side effects on the stomach. Over time, scientists were able to obtain a purified version of this compound and combined it with sodium to neutralize this effect.

In 1899, a German chemist working for the Bayer company convinced his bosses to market this new wonder drug to the public, and it became one of the first all purpose pain relievers.. Initially, aspirin was sold as a powder and became available in 1915 in tablet form.

 

Aspirin’s effect as an anti-clotting medication, allows it to prevent strokes and heart attacks. While other medications such as ibuprofen have become available for pain relief in more recent years., aspirin is still used by many.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Household Pests: An Avoidable Asthma Trigger

Those annoying little insects and rodents commonly found in crowded inner-cities do more than just disgust people. They also trigger asthma.

According to the American Lung Association, pests, such as rats, mice, and cockroaches, produce allergens that aggravate asthma by inflaming the airway of the lungs and causing them to tighten. It is also being determined if allergens can actually cause asthma to develop in preschool aged children.

Pests produce allergens when they shed skin, leave behind waste products, or die. These pest-related asthma triggers, as well as the pesticides used to eliminate them, can worsen asthma. When possible, pesticides should be avoided.

“Asthma affects almost 20 million Americans and is one of the most chronic childhood diseases,” said Dr. Alan Roth, Chairman of Family Medicine at Jamaica Hospital. “It accounts for countless work and school absences, as well as frequent emergency visits and hospitalizations. In crowded urban areas, such as New York City, the environment can play a role in the onset of symptoms.”
Instead, Dr. Roth suggests individuals take the following precautions to safeguard their homes:

  • Keep food sealed and stored properly
  • Clean kitchen floors and counters daily
  • Seal cracks and holes in homes
  • Keep basements and crawl spaces well ventilated and dry

“If you’re aware of what triggers your asthma, you can take steps to avoid them, which can ultimately help prevent an asthma attack,” said Dr. Roth.

If you suffer from asthma and would like to schedule an appointment at Jamaica Hospital’s Ambulatory Care Center, please call 718-206-6942.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Celiac Disease

Celiac disease is a digestive disorder in which an individual is unable to digest gluten, the name for the general proteins found in wheat, rye, and barley, as well as certain vitamins, medicines and lip balms.
Celiac disease is both a disease of malabsorption (nutrients are not absorbed properly) and an abnormal immune reaction to gluten. This intolerance to gluten triggers an immune response that damages and/or destroys villi, the tiny protrusions that line the small intestine and absorb nutrients from foods such as fat, calcium and iron into the bloodstream. Without the properly functioning villi, nutrients will fail to reach the bloodstream and an individual with celiac disease can become malnourished.

There are many causes and triggers of celiac disease, which include:
• Genetic
• Surgery
• Childbirth
• Pregnancy
• Viral infection
• Severe emotional stress or trauma

Symptoms of celiac disease include:
• Digestive problems (bloating, pain, gas, diarrhea, and weight loss)
• Dermatitis Herpetiformis (a severe skin rash)
• Iron deficiency anemia (a low red blood cell count)
• Muscle cramps
• Growth problems (mostly found in children)
• Seizures
• Tingling sensation in the legs
• Mouth sores
• Missed menstrual period

Celiac disease can be diagnosed by a series of blood tests that examine gluten auto-antibodies and by a minor bowel biopsy to assess gut damage. Since gluten is a staple in the average person’s diet, it is important to continue eating this protein until the tests are completed and evaluated for the most accurate diagnosis.
The only treatment for celiac disease is a gluten-free diet. Gluten-free diets are mainly composed of fruits, vegetables, meats, fish, poultry, beans, nuts and most dairy products. Healthy, gluten-free alternatives to wheat and grains include almond meal flour, corn, quinoa, potatoes, and soy flour.
If you think you have celiac disease, a doctor can perform tests to diagnose your condition. For more information, please call Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Gastroenterology Department at 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

How to Control Diabetes With Exercise

                                                                                   

The three cornerstones in the treatment of diabetes are food, medications, and activity. Of these three, activity is often a first choice for the person who has diabetes. Moving toward a more physically active life is generally inexpensive, convenient, usually produces great rewards in terms of blood glucose control and a general feeling of well-being.

Whenever you actively use a muscle, you burn both fatty acids and glucose. During and after periods of activity, your falling glucose level is sensed by the beta cells in your pancreas, and they relax their output of insulin.

This gives your beta cells a break from excessive insulin production. In addition, the lower insulin levels signal your liver to empty its glucose reserves (glycogen) into the blood to supply the muscles with needed energy.

As physical activity continues, the liver converts amino acids, lactic acid, and fats into glucose to supply the muscles. If the activity continues long enough, even the body’s fat cells are affected. They compensate for the reduced fatty acid levels in your blood by converting their stored triglycerides into fatty acids.

When all of these steps are considered, it’s easy to see why using your muscles is the perfect treatment for diabetes.

Exercising can:

  • Lower blood glucose
  • Lower Fatty Acid levels in your blood
  • Reduce the workload of your pancreas

Becoming more physically active is not completely without risks for people with diabetes. On the other hand, remaining sedentary is no bargain, either; it does nothing to help your glucose control, your weight management, or your overall well-being. To gain the benefits of increased physical activity and minimize potential risks, you need to understand and evaluate those risks up front and take steps to prevent problems before they occur.

Before you increase your activity level, you need to account for any diabetic complications or related conditions that may be present. Some types of activity may not be wise for people with certain medical conditions. Any activity that includes straining, such as weight lifting, can dramatically increase blood pressure during the actual activity, further aggravating any hypertension that may be present.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.