World Hepatitis Day

In 2010 the World Health Organization ( W.H.O. ) designated July 28th as World Hepatitis Day. This serves to increase awareness about viral hepatitis and to influence change in disease prevention, testing and treatment.

Hepatitis is a virus that causes an inflammation of the liver. The liver is an organ in the body that processes nutrients, filters the blood and fights infections.

The most common forms of hepatitis are A, B, and C. Hepatitis B and C kill close to 1.4 million people each year and cause almost 80 percent of all liver cancer cases. Many people have the hepatitis virus and are unaware of it.
Symptoms of acute hepatitis B include:
• Fever
• Nausea
• Loss of appetite
• Jaundice
• Abdominal pain
• Fatigue

Hepatitis is spread from person to person through contact with bodily fluids. It is possible that people remain without symptoms for many years but during this time the disease is slowly destroying the liver. It can take many years for the symptoms to appear.

Blood tests are available that can detect the virus at an early stage.
Ways to reduce infection:
• Use only sterile equipment for injections
• Test all donated blood for hepatitis
• Practice safe sex
• Encourage people to get hepatitis B vaccine

Medication exists that can cure hepatitis C and can control hepatitis B infection. When given properly, people are less likely to die from liver cancer and cirrhosis and also are less likely to transmit the disease to others. The hepatitis B vaccine is given in three doses over a six month period and it is recommended that it be initiated right after birth if possible.

To make an appointment with a physician at Jamaica Hospital to discuss the vaccine, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

The Health Benefits of Cherries

Cherries are a small fruit that come in a variety of colors (yellow to dark red) and flavors (sweet or tart).

A cup of raw cherries contains 97 calories and 2 grams of protein. They are an excellent source of nutrients that the body needs to function properly such as vitamin C, potassium, manganese, and fiber.

Health benefits of cherries include:

  • They are high in antioxidants which slow the aging process
  • They contain high levels of polyphenols which are excellent for combatting inflammation, helping to reduce cell damage, and good for reducing symptoms of gout and arthritis
  • They contain beta-carotene and vitamin C both of which are anti-inflammatories and antioxidants. These are useful for relieving muscle pain due to exercise
  • They contain potassium which helps to keep the heart healthy by maintaining a proper heart rate and regulating blood pressure
  • They contain melatonin which is helpful in regulating the sleep – wake cycle

Cherries can be enjoyed as a raw snack, added to a fruit salad, made into a pie or a fruit juice. They can be found year round in the fruit section of most supermarkets but summertime is when they are most commonly seen. If you are looking for a fruit that is both refreshing and nutritious, cherries are definitely a good choice.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

MediSys Family Care Center in Hollis Tudors

This month, we would like to shine our spotlight on the MediSys Family Care Center in Hollis Tudors.

The center which  is located at 200-16 Hollis Avenue opened in 2000.  This site currently offers 11 state-of-the-art exam rooms and is staffed by 20 employees.

The MediSys Family Care Center in Hollis Tudors offers a wide range of services including:

  • Internal Medicine
  • Dental
  • Pediatrics
  • Podiatry
  • Post-Covid Care

Our staff has been warmly embraced by the community and a few of our providers have shared their thoughts as to why they enjoy working at this site. “I like to work at Hollis Tudors because we get to uplift our patients, lend our knowledge and hearts to the ones that need it. We encourage one another to keep providing the best patient care possible” says Marla George, LPN. Melisha Cornish, Dental Assistant tells us “We like to be the change that we wish to see in the world”, and Dr. Pan San Chan adds “ We treat our patients like our family with love, compassion and kindness”.

The current hours of operation are:

Monday – Friday   8:30 AM – 5:00 PM

Beginning on September 1st the hours of operation will be

Monday and Wednesday 10:30 AM – 7:00 PM

Tuesday, Thursday and Friday 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM

To schedule an appointment at Medisys Family Care Center in Hollis Tudors please call 718-736-8204.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Jamaica Hospital Launches The VETO Anti-Gun Violence Program

Jamaica Hospital Medical Center is one of the busiest trauma centers in New York City and the five boroughs, and the only trauma center providing care for a large community in South Queens.  We are proud to be designated as a Level 1 Trauma Center by the American College of Surgeons, the highest designation level.  This means that our trauma center is prepared to provide emergent life-saving care to the most seriously injured patients 24 hours a day.

In the spring of 2020, while our community began to recover from the first surge of the COVID-19 pandemic, we noticed a disturbing trend, more and more patients were coming to Jamaica Hospital for firearm-related injuries.

We recognized the importance of expanding our efforts beyond patients’ medical needs to potentially impact other determinants of gun violence in our community.  By taking a true public health approach to gun violence, we can make a meaningful change in not only our patients’ lives but for all of Queens, as we work as a community to end gun violence.

With that, we are proud to announce Jamaica Hospital’s V.E.T.O program, for Violence Elimination and Trauma Outreach.

As our clinical group of trauma physicians and nurses focus on healing injuries, our team of social workers and case managers will focus on addressing non-medical determinants of health for gun violence survivors by providing violence intervention services and guidance to hospital and community resources.  We are fostering relationships with community organizations to provide additional support for gun violence survivors and their families and working to raise awareness on the epidemic of gun violence.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

What You Need To Know About The Delta Variant

It is common for viruses to change through mutation, and new variants of a virus are expected to occur. These variants can affect the strength, symptoms, or transmission rate of the virus. There have been multiple variants of the virus that causes COVID-19 identified in the United States and globally throughout this pandemic. One variant that you may be hearing more and more about is the Delta variant.

The highly transmissible delta variant of the COVID-19 virus was first identified in India and has now been reported in at least 104 countries. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Delta variant is now the dominant strain of the virus, representing 51.7% of new COVID cases in the United States as of the week of July 3.

The Delta variant is a cause of concern to health authorities because it is thought to be the most transmissible variant yet. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), the Delta variant is estimated to be approximately 55% more transmissible than the Alpha variant, which was first identified in Britain last year. Officials believe it is more contagious because of its ability to partially evade the antibodies made by the immune system after a coronavirus infection or vaccination.

Many health experts fear the variant will cause a surge in new cases this fall, hitting the unvaccinated the hardest. Currently, only 48% of adult Americans are fully vaccinated, well below the 70% most believe is needed to achieve herd immunity. In fact, areas in the U.S. with low vaccination rates are already beginning to see delta-driven outbreaks, and the number of COVID-19 cases has begun to climb again nationally.

The good news is that data suggests that several widely used shots, including those made by Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna, Johnson & Johnson and AstraZeneca, appear to retain most of their effectiveness against the delta variant.

Jamaica Hospital urges everyone eligible to get vaccinated if they have not already done so.  Vaccination is the best way to stop the spread of all the variants and reduce the odds that new, even more, dangerous variants emerge.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

How COVID-19 Can Affect Your Mental Health

Many people who were diagnosed with COVID-19 over the past year and a half have reported a variety of long-term symptoms.  The conditions that have received the most attention focus on either the physical effects of the virus, such as shortness of breath or fatigue or cognitive deficits, such as confusion or memory loss. For some, however, there are other lingering symptoms that can affect their mental health.

Recent research has concluded that nearly one person in five diagnosed with COVID-19 now also suffers some form of a mental health disorder. This can include:

  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Insomnia

Other patients may experience Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).  Patients experiencing PTSD typically have spent time in a hospital, more specifically in an intensive care unit, or were on a ventilator.

While it is difficult to determine is if these mental health symptoms emerge in patients as a result of neurological reaction to the virus or are due to the stresses of contracting the virus, it is important to raise awareness of the issue and provide resources to get these individuals the necessary help.

Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Post-COVID Care Center, located in our MediSys Hollis Tudors Center at 2001-16 Hollis Avenue, offers comprehensive range of services for those living with lingering effects of the virus, mental health services delivered by highly qualified psychiatrists. To make an appointment, please call 718-736-8204.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Summertime Allergies

If you are one of the millions of Americans who experience summertime allergies, you may want to control your seasonal symptoms with this allergy sufferer’s survival guide.

Summer allergies occur when your immune system tries to defend your body against substances that are harmless. Your body responds to that substance by releasing histamines and other chemicals into the bloodstream. These chemicals cause symptoms such as itchy or watery eyes, sneezing, stuffiness or runny nose to occur.

About 50 million Americans suffer from year-round allergies to mold, dust, and pets. However, summer allergies are mostly triggered by trees, pollen, leaves, grasses and ragweed.

Summertime also brings out other environmental factors that can cause allergic reactions for example smog mold and insects that sting such as  bees, wasps, hornets, and fire ants.

There isn’t a cure for allergies, but there are ways you can find relief.  If your symptoms are minor, there are over-the-counter antihistamines or nasal sprays that may help.

The most important thing to remember is that you do not have to suffer unnecessarily.  If over– the-counter treatments aren’t working, then it’s probably a good idea to seek the advice of a doctor.

To schedule an appointment with an allergist at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center. please call 718-206-7001

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Summer Is Kidney Stone Season

They are less than a centimeter in size, yet they can cause intense discomfort.  Kidney stones are one of the most painful urologic disorders, and they occur more frequently during the summer because our bodies loose more water due to sweating, which can result in dehydration.

Kidney stones are small, hard masses made of mineral and acid salts that develop in the urine.  No single factor causes kidney stones, and not everyone is susceptible to them.  Several factors often work together to create an environment in which at-risk people develop kidney stones.  People most at risk for kidney stones include:

• Adults
• Males
• Those with family or personal history of kidney stones
• Those with personal history of digestive diseases and/or surgery

In general, kidney stones form when the fluid and various mineral and acids that make up urine are out of balance.  “With adequate hydration, calcium and other crystal-forming substances properly dissolve in the urine,” says Ricardo Ricciardi, MD, Director of Urology at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center. 

Although genetics, family history, and some medical conditions can increase your odds of developing kidney stones, you can still play a role in preventing them through the following steps:

• Drink enough water. “If you’re prone to kidney stones, your best defense is to stay hydrated during hot summer months,” says Dr. Ricciardi.  “Hot temperatures make your body lose more water than usual, so it is important to replenish it throughout the day, depending on your weight and activity level.”

• Eat less meat.  Diets rich in animal protein increase your risk for kidney stones; so try to incorporate other protein sources, such as beans, nuts and seeds, instead.

• Limit your salt intake.  Excess salt absorbs water in your system, which can also dehydrate you.  Limit your daily sodium intake to 1,500 mg or less by avoiding fast food, reading nutrition labels when you buy groceries, and cooking with less salt and more herbs and spices.

• Drink less caffeine.  Even though you may think you are getting enough liquid by consuming caffeinated sodas, coffee, or tea, caffeine is a diuretic, meaning it can dehydrate you.
Sneaking Symptoms

Kidney stones often do not cause symptoms.  If the crystals are small enough, they may pass through the urinary tract and out of the body without being felt.  If a stone is large enough to attract attention, however, the first symptom is usually severe pain in the backside that begins when the stone moves into the urinary tract, blocking the flow of urine.  The pain may later spread to the groin and lower abdomen.  Other symptoms include a persistent urge to urinate, painful urination, and pink, red, or brown urine.

Seek medical attention if you have pain accompanied by nausea and vomiting or fever and chills, or if pain is so severe that you cannot sit still or find a comfortable position. If you are experiencing any of the symptoms mentioned, or suspect you have Kidney Stones and would like to schedule an appointment, please contact Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center at 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Employee Spotlight Shines on Paula Utilla

We are proud to shine our Employee Spotlight on Paula Utilla, Lactation Coordinator in the OB / GYN Department. Paula has been at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center for seven years.

Paula moved to the United States in 2003 from Canada where she grew up in Pickering a small town on the outskirts of Toronto.  She attended Holy Redeemer Elementary School, St. Mary’s High School and Durham College. Paula currently lives in Brooklyn with her husband and their two children, a son who is 14 years old and a daughter who is 18 years old. Also living with them is their very sweet one-year-old 120-pound pit bull named Canelo.

Paula spends her free time gardening, jewelry making, and assisting her daughter in the kitchen with baking all kinds of goodies. She loves traveling to places that have cultural and historical significance. She has already visited Egypt and Rome and her goal is to get to Greece one day. She enjoys all types of food, the spicier the better. Paula likes to listen to music from the nineties especially Hip Hop and R&B.

Paula is a very big advocate for a woman’s right to breastfeed. Teaching moms how to breastfeed is something she is very passionate about. She aims to make a difference in the lives of moms and their newborn babies.

Paula enjoys working at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center for many reasons, one of which is the diversity of the patients that she sees. We are fortunate to have Paula on our team and we look forward to her continuing to make a difference in the lives of mothers and their babies for a long time to come.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Swim Safety Tips

The weather is warming up and people will be looking for ways to keep cool. One way that has always been popular during the warm summer months is swimming in a pool. Every year there are countless accidents and also fatalities at or near swimming pools. Many of which  could have been avoided had precautions been taken.

Safety Tips to follow:
• Never leave children unattended near a pool
• Only swim when there is a lifeguard present
• Every pool should have proper drain covers
• Pools should have alarms and proper fencing
• Keep the pool clean
• There should be no diving allowed in pools that are shallow
• Never swim alone
• There should be no horseplay in or near a pool
• Do not swim under the influence of alcohol or drugs
• Do not swim in a thunderstorm
• It is a good idea to give children swimming lessons before the start of the summer
• Children who don’t know how to swim should be given flotation devices to wear

There are many organizations around the country that offer swimming lessons for children and adults of all ages. If you don’t know how to swim, look into getting some lessons before heading out to the pool. You will have a good time and you will also be a lot safer this summer.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.