Asthma and Exercise

Maintaining an active lifestyle is important for both physical and mental health. With proper diagnosis and effective treatment, you should be able to enjoy the benefits of an exercise program without experiencing asthma symptoms.
When searching for an exercise program, you should research activities that involve short, intermittent periods of exertion, such as volleyball, gymnastics, baseball, and wrestling, are generally well tolerated by people with asthma.
Swimming, which is a strong endurance sport, is also well tolerated by many people with asthma because it is usually performed while breathing warm, moist air. It is also an excellent activity for maintaining physical fitness.
Before starting an exercise program, it is important that you talk to your doctor. Your medical professional can assist you in creating an asthma action plan, which will tell you what type of exercise is best suited for you and what to do if you have symptoms during exercise.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Stress and Heart Disease

Everyone has some degree of stress in their lives. Health concerns, family and relationship issues, financial problems can all cause stress which can ultimately affect one’s health. 

 Stress has been shown to raise the levels of certain hormones such as adrenaline and cortisol. Stress can affect the way blood clots and that can increase the risk of a heart attack.

 Stress can:

 Cause ulcers

Exacerbate asthma

Lead to digestive problems

Cause problems sleeping

Elevate blood pressure

Lead to coronary artery disease

Stress can lead to unhealthy behaviors such as overeating, smoking and alcohol consumption. These activities are considered coping mechanisms that can lead to additional health problems. It is very important to identify the sources of stress and learn to manage them. Some tips include to manage stress include:

Learning to cope

Having a positive approach to situations

Starting an exercise regime

Eating healthy

Getting proper rest

If these don’t work, you can speak with a medical professional who can prescribe medication. The important thing to remember is that by reducing stress you will also be lowering the likelihood of developing long term health issues.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Breastfeeding and Going Back To Work

If you’re breastfeeding your newborn and returning to work, you may be wondering how you are going to do both. With a little discipline and some planning, breastfeeding after you return to work is a challenge you can overcome.

Josie Kirton, Clinical Nurse Manager and Lactation Consultant at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center has offered some suggestions that are designed to make nursing your child and transitioning back to work easier.
1. Before going back to work, speak with your supervisor about your plans to breastfeed. Discuss different types of schedules, such as starting back part-time at first or taking split shifts.
2. Many Lactation Consultants recommend that breastfeeding moms join a breastfeeding support group to talk with other mothers about breastfeeding after your baby is born and how they transitioned back into the workplace.
3. Jamaica Hospital provides a lactation support program for employees. If your company does not, ask about private areas where you can comfortably and safely express milk. The Affordable Care Act (Health care reform) supports work-based efforts to assist nursing mothers.
4. Ask the lactation program director, your supervisor, wellness program director, employee human resources office, or other co-workers if they know of other women at your company who have breastfed after returning to work.
If you have any questions regarding breastfeeding your baby, you can call Jamaica Hospital’s Lactation Consultant at 718-670 4200 for answers to FAQ’s.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

The Influenza Vaccine

Influenza – the unwelcome guest that comes calling on us every year – often with many very unpleasant consequences. Historically, widespread flu epidemics have had devastating effects on large portions of the earth’s population. It wasn’t until the 1930’s that two scientists, Dr. Jonas Salk and Dr. Thomas Francis developed the first vaccine to prevent the flu virus. The vaccine was given to American soldiers during World War II and was found to be useful in preventing the widespread outbreaks that had been common before the vaccines were used. In the years after the war, the vaccine was made available to the general public and has greatly reduced the widespread epidemics that were so common before.

Research has helped to develop better vaccines with fewer side effects and also better suited to combat strains of the influenza virus that keep changing every year. Over the past 60 years millions of people have been given the flu vaccine each year. Many people are hesitant about getting the vaccine at all however, there are much fewer catastrophic epidemics throughout the world, thanks in large part to the work done by Dr Salk and Dr. Francis in the early part of the last century.

Influenza is a serious disease that can lead to hospitalization and sometimes even death. Every flu season is different, and influenza infection can affect people differently. It is important that you consult with your doctor before getting the flu vaccine.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Obesity: Lifestyle or Genetics?

“How does she eat so much and not gain any weight?”

It’s a question that has left many puzzled and quite frustrated. The conversation about weight, however, is a longstanding one. Today, especially, weight gain and weight loss remain relevant discussions, as the United States faces an obesity epidemic.

Though several health initiatives to help fight obesity have been implemented over the past few years, it is important to first understand what factors contribute to obesity. According to a National Institutes of Health funded study conducted by UCLA, not only does behavior and environment affect obesity, but genetic factors can also play a significant role in causing obesity.

How our genes actually influence obesity varies. As explained by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), genes give the body instruction for responding to changes in its environment. Some research has linked genes to metabolism, pointing out that genetics affects how one’s body responds to high-fat diets. Genes can either cause an increased tendency to store fat or a diminished capacity to use dietary fats as fuel. Other research has suggested that genes influence behaviors, such as overeating and being sedentary.

The conversation about obesity can now change since research has shown that body weight is hereditary and that genetic disposition affects weight. In all efforts to fight obesity, living environments where high calorie foods are prevalent and physical activity is limited should be looked at more closely.

We understand that the road to healthier choices isn’t easy to travel, especially alone. Here at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center our outpatient registered Dietitians assist patients to grow their knowledge about nutrition, wellness and healthy eating. To schedule an appointment the outpatient nutrition services department can be reached directly at 718-206-7056.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

When Bugs Bite

Summer usually means picnics and family reunions, but it also means a reunion with insects that can wreak havoc on outdoor activities. Follow these tips to minimize the potential for bug bites and bee stings.

When outdoors – especially in wooded areas – wear long sleeves, pants, and socks to help protect your skin from insect bites. Be aware that insects may be drawn to scented soaps and perfumes. Also, cover food and drain or dump standing water.

“Although applying insect repellent may help adults and children avoid bug bites, these products are unsafe to use on infants,” says Farshad Bagheri, MD, Infectious Disease Specialist atJamaicaHospitalMedicalCenter. “Repellents containing citronella or less than 10 to 30 percent DEET are safe for older children, but they should only be applied once and washed off as soon as possible.”

Treating Bites and Bee Stings

 If a sting occurs, remove the stinger as soon as possible by scraping the area with your fingernail or something with a flat surface, such as a credit card. For bee and wasp stings and non-poisonous spider bites, wash the area thoroughly with soap and water and apply ice to reduce swelling. Continue to wash two or three times daily until the skin has healed.

“Be sure to talk with your physician before taking antihistamines or other over-the-counter medications for itching to avoid potential drug interactions,” says Dr. Bagheri.

Severe Reactions

“If you notice swelling or a rash around the site of a sting or if pain persists for three days, seek medical attention,” says Dr. Bagheri. “Dizziness, nausea, tightness of the throat or chest, wheezing, or swelling of the lips, face, or tongue can indicate a severe allergic reaction, which requires immediate emergency medical attention.”

If you or your child is stung in the mouth, seek medical attention immediately. Severe swelling occurs quickly in oral mucous membranes and can block airways, making breathing difficult or impossible.

If you have a severe reaction to a bug bite, go to the nearest hospital Emergency Room or call 911. Otherwise, to schedule an appointment, please call 718-206-6742.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Could Hypertention be Triggering your Migraine?

The exact causes of migraines are unknown, people with migraines may inherit the tendency to be affected by certain migraine triggers, such as fatigue, bright lights, weather changes, and Hypertension.

One condition that is commonly associated as being a “trigger” for a migraine is Hypertension.

In patients with migraine and established hypertension, good control of blood pressure may be beneficial in controlling their headache.

So, be sure to consult your doctor before taking any migraine medications since many of the drugs used to treat hypertension may cause headaches.

If you are experiencing painful migrain headaches, the Ambulatory Care Center at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center has convenient hours and days of operation.  To schedule an apointment, call 718-206-7001.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Is Your Child An Internet Addict?

It’s often difficult for parents to know how much time their children spend online.Often children play video games, view videos and browse social networking sites.

Spending too much time online can lead to the deterioration of your child’s school work and can cause problems with their relationships with family and friends.

Experts at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center warn that time spent online is at an all-time high, and rapidly increasing with children, tweens and teens.

“It’s easy to see why parents can be overwhelmed by their child’s excessive internet use,” said Dr. Fermin Gonzalez, Psychiatrist at JamaicaHospital Medical Center. “According to a recent study by the Kaiser Family Foundation, children ages 8 to 18 spend an average of 7 hours and 38 minutes a day consuming media for fun, including TV, music, video games and other content. About two-thirds of 8 to 18 year-olds had no rules on the amount of time spent watching TV, playing video games, or using a computer.”

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that parents limit their kids screen time for entertainment to less than two hours per day and children under 2 have no TV or internet exposure.

Research shows that academic failure correlates with addictive video game play, and to a higher incidence of attention problems. Conversely, academic achievers spend less time online.  Research has also revealed that child and adolescent video game addiction correlates with functional impairment, emotional problems, poor conduct, hyperactivity and peer problems, as well as with depression and social phobia. In addition, several studies have proven a relationship between excessive video game play and obesity and poor diet among children in grades 4 through 6.

Parents should discuss with their children their expectations for responsible online usage and set limits on how much time can be spent online.  Dr. Gonzalez suggests the following rules for internet use:

  • Regularly determine how much time your kids are online every day.
  • Don’t put a computer or game console in your child’s bedroom—rather put them in the living room.
  • Avoid online activity before bedtime.
  • Charge children’s cell or smart phone or other handheld devices overnight in your bedroom.
  • Be a role model. Set an example with your own internet usage.
  • Use an alarm clock or timer to limit your child’s time online.
  • Provide alternatives to online activity and video games: sports, reading, play dates, time with pets, etc.
  • Set a rule: no handheld devices at the table during meals.

For more information or to schedule an appointment for your child with one of Jamaica Hospital’s Child Psychiatrists, please call 718-206-5575.

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All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

How Safe is Hookah Smoking?

Hookah smoking is a growing trend among teens and young adults. Though the practice of smoking specially-made tobacco from water pipes is believed by many to be a safe alternative to cigarette smoking, medical research has shown otherwise.

When one smokes hookah, tobacco is heated by charcoal in a smoke chamber. The smoke then passes through water and is drawn through a rubber hose to a mouthpiece. Hookah smoking typically takes place in a group setting and generally last about an hour.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), “hookah smoking delivers the addictive drug nicotine, is as toxic as cigarette smoking, and poses several health risks.” In a typical hookah session, smokers take approximately 200 puffs, compared to cigarette smokers who average 20 puffs a session. Additionally, the volume of smoke inhaled during a hookah session is much higher than the smoke inhaled while smoking a cigarette, 90,000 milliliters compared to 600 milliliters.

It is also believed that the charcoal used to heat the tobacco increases toxicity levels of various compounds, including carbon monoxide and heavy metals. Therefore, hookah smoking is linked to lung and oral cancer, as well as reduced lung function. These are the same harmful health effects as cigarettes.  Since hookah smoking involves using, and often sharing a mouthpiece, there is also the risk of developing and spreading infectious diseases, such as herpes, influenza, and hepatitis.

Although research on hookah smoking is still developing, there is enough evidence that suggest it is just as dangerous as cigarette smoking, if not worse. Hookah smoking and its use of flavored tobacco is marketed to young adults but it’s important to understand there is no such thing as smoking hookah safely.

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All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Ear Infections and Your Child

Ear infections are among the most common health conditions in young children and babies. However, some children are too young to tell you that they have ear pain. How can you tell if your child has an ear infection?

Look for the following symptoms, which are all signs of ear infections:

 

  • ear drainage
  • fever
  • trouble hearing
  • tugging on the ear, fussiness, or excessive crying
  • difficulty sleeping
  • difficulty eating or chewing

While ear infections are not always preventable, you can help minimize your child’s risk of developing them by keeping him or her away from second hand smoke and people with colds whenever possible. Frequent hand washing also helps. If your child has frequent ear infections it is advisable to see an Ear, Nose and Throat specialist for a complete evaluation.

Originating from germs found in the nose or throat, ear infections are easily treated. Over-the-counter pain medications can be given as needed for temporary relief.  Ear infections may resolve by themselves, however depending on the severity, antibiotics may be needed. It is best to speak to your physician to determine the proper treatment.

If you suspect your child has an ear infection, please call 718-206-7001 to schedule an appointment with a pediatrician.

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All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.