Adult ADHD

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a common neurodevelopmental disorder.

Most people associate ADHD with children who have trouble focusing, are overly active or have difficulty controlling impulsive behaviors.  While ADHD does commonly affect children, it can also occur in adults. In fact, it is estimated that 4% to 5% of adults living in the United States have the disorder.

ADHD begins in childhood and can continue into adulthood. However, many adults are unaware that they have ADHD. This is because the disorder was never recognized or diagnosed during childhood.

In adults, the symptoms of ADHD may present differently than they do in children and are unique to each person. They can include:

  • Anxiety
  • Trouble coping with stress
  • Poor listening skills
  • Getting easily distracted
  • Difficulty paying close attention to details
  • Struggling to complete tasks or multitask
  • Poor organizational skills
  • An inability to control impulses i.e., Interrupting others during conversations
  • Acting without consideration for others
  • Frequent mood swings
  • Forgetfulness
  • Often losing things i.e., keys, phones, wallets

These symptoms can interfere significantly with an individual’s relationships, career, finances and other aspects of daily life.

With an accurate diagnosis, symptoms of adult ADHD can be treated or managed appropriately to reduce the risk of developing social, emotional, or occupational problems.

To accurately diagnose ADHD in adults, the American Psychiatric Association recommends a comprehensive evaluation which typically includes a review of past and current symptoms, a medical exam and history, and use of adult rating scales or checklists.

Treatment for adult ADHD typically involves education ( learning more about ADHD), medication,  therapy and other behavioral treatments, or a combination of methods.

If you are experiencing symptoms associated with adult ADHD, you should speak with a doctor. To schedule an appointment with a doctor at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Wisdom Teeth

Wisdom teeth, also referred to as the third set of molars, are the last set of teeth to develop. They form in the back of the mouth on the upper and lower jaw. Most people’s wisdom teeth surface when they are teenagers or young adults.

Wisdom teeth can become a problem when they fail to grow in proper alignment with the rest of our teeth.  When these teeth are not growing in correctly, it is referred to as being impacted. A tooth that is impacted may have only broken through the gum partially, or not at all. This can lead to infection, pain, tooth decay, gum disease and crowding of the teeth that are adjacent.

The signs and symptoms of an impacted wisdom tooth include:

  • Tenderness of the jaw
  • Bad breath
  • Bleeding gums
  • Swollen gums
  • Problems opening the mouth

Wisdom teeth that are impacted can’t be prevented. The best way to monitor for a potential problem is to have regular oral check-ups and an x-ray of the mouth every year. Not all wisdom teeth are going to be impacted, but when they are, and if symptoms develop, your dentist may want to remove them to prevent potential infections, disruption of the other teeth, and also to prevent further discomfort.

If you would like to schedule an appointment with a dentist at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, you may call 718-206-6980

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Issues Back to School Safety Guidelines

As we near the near the beginning of the school year, many parents are concerned about the necessary precautions that they should be taking to protect their children from the Covid-19 virus. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ( CDC ) issued guidelines to protect students, teachers, staff and families. These guidelines are based upon the most recent current scientific evidence and can change as more information becomes available. The CDC guidelines are suggestions and are meant to supplement not override the safety laws established by any federal, state, local, territorial or tribal health entities.

The current CDC Guidelines can be found on their website

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/community/schools-childcare/k-12-guidance.html

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

What Causes Feet to Swell ?

For many people who spend long hours standing every day, experiencing swollen feet is a pretty routine occurrence. The swelling is caused by an accumulation of fluid in the skin and typically will resolve once the feet are elevated.

The symptoms of swelling are dependent on the underlying cause is. Swelling can be mild puffiness with no discomfort to very severe with changes in skin texture, color, and with a lot of pain. In very severe cases, swelling can lead to ulcerations, infections, and ultimately death if not treated in a timely manner.

Some of the medical issues of swollen feet can be due to:

  • Injury
  • Pregnancy
  • Congestive heart  failure
  • Lymphedema
  • Blood Clots
  • Varicose veins
  • Infections
  • Medications such as steroids, antidepressants, and calcium channel blockers
  • Venous insufficiency

Diagnosing swollen feet usually starts with a visual inspection and then by pressing into the skin with a finger to see if it leads to an indentation.

In some cases preventing swollen feet can be done by wearing support stockings, proper exercise, eating a healthy diet low in salt, and avoiding smoking and drinking alcohol.

Treating swollen feet is dependent on the cause and can include:

  • Medication
  • Surgery
  • Wrapping the limb with an elastic bandage
  • Elevating the foot above the level of the heart when possible

If you are experiencing swollen feet, consult your doctor who will find out what is causing the problem. If you would like to schedule an appointment with a doctor at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, you can call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Pineapple Salsa Grilled Chicken

Looking for a healthy, refreshing summer meal? Try this great recipe for Pineapple Salsa Grilled Chicken!

INGREDIENTS

  • Juice of 4 limes, divided
  • 1/4 c. 
  • plus 1 tbsp. freshly chopped cilantro
  • 1/4 c. 
  • extra-virgin olive oil, plus more for grill
  • 2 tsp. 
  • honey
  • Kosher salt
  • 1 lb. 
  • boneless skinless chicken breasts
  • 2 c. 
  • chopped pineapple
  • avocado, diced
  • 1/4 
  • red onion, diced
  • Freshly ground black pepper

DIRECTIONS

  1. Make marinade: In a large bowl, whisk together juice of 3 limes, 1/4 cup cilantro, oil, and honey and season with salt.
  2. Add chicken to a large resealable plastic bag and pour in marinade. Let marinate in the refrigerator at least 2 hours, or up to overnight.
  3. When ready to grill, heat grill to high. Oil grates and grill chicken until charred and cooked through, 8 minutes per side.
  4. Meanwhile, in a medium bowl, stir together pineapple, avocado, red onion, remaining lime juice, and remaining tablespoon cilantro. Season with salt and pepper.
  5. Spoon salsa over chicken before serving.

For this an other healthy recipes, visit https://www.delish.com/cooking/recipe-ideas/recipes/a47355/grilled-honey-lime-chicken-with-pineapple-salsa-recipe/

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Restless Legs Syndrome

Restless legs syndrome diagnosis

Restless legs syndrome (RLS) or Willis-Ekbom disease is a common disorder that causes what is often described as tingling, pulling, throbbing, itching, burning, aching or crawling sensations in the legs. These sensations result in an uncontrollable urge to move your legs.  

RLS can also occur in other parts of the body such as the arms or torso; however, these instances are less common.

Anyone can be at risk for developing RLS.  According to the Sleep Foundation, “RLS affects 5 to 10% of adults and 2 to 4% of children in the U.S. and it is found in women more often than men. People of all ages can develop RLS, but the most severe symptoms tend to occur in older adults.”

Symptoms of restless legs syndrome can include:

  • An irresistible urge to move the legs or arms
  • Discomfort in the legs or arms
  • Trouble staying asleep due to the urge to move your limbs
  • Periodic limb movement or leg twitching while you sleep
  • Daytime sleepiness due to sleep disruption

These symptoms most commonly occur in the late afternoon or evening hours and may increase in severity at night. They can also happen when you remain inactive or seated for extended periods. Symptoms typically go away in the morning.

Although the exact cause of restless legs syndrome is unknown, it is believed that genetics and environmental factors play a significant role.  RLS is often associated with other medical conditions such as:

  • Iron deficiency
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Late-stage kidney disease
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Peripheral neuropathy

RLS may also occur temporarily during pregnancy with most women developing the disorder during their third trimester.

Some medications such as anti-depressants, anti-nausea, and allergy drugs can contribute to the development of RLS.

A diagnosis for restless legs syndrome is determined after your medical and family history is assessed, a complete physical and neurological exam is conducted, and blood tests are ordered to rule out other possible conditions. Your doctor may also refer you to a sleep specialist for an evaluation.

Currently, there is no cure for restless legs syndrome.  However, there are treatments available to manage symptoms.  Your doctor may include the following treatments or therapies in your care plan: exercise, massages,  foot wraps, stress reduction, iron supplementation or prescription medications.

To schedule an appointment with a doctor at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Nat’l Immunization Awareness Month

August is National Immunization Awareness Month. The importance of this designation is to make people aware about the different types of vaccines they should get throughout their lifetime. Vaccines are important to keep the body healthy by building up an immunity to serious diseases. If you would like to make an appointment with a physician at Jamaica Hospital, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Are You Prepared for Hurricane Season ?

While we typically associate the summer with delightful temperatures, this time of year can also bring dangerous weather conditions, namely hurricanes.

With a long history of providing relief to places previously devastated by hurricanes, including sending personnel to assist the victims of Hurricanes Katrina and Maria, Jamaica Hospital Medical Center is experienced and knowledgeable about how to properly prepare for such an event. Our hospital would like to share the following safety tips with our community:

  • In case of a need to evacuate, know where the nearest evacuation route is located
  • Keep a supply of non-perishable food that doesn’t require refrigeration or cooking
  • In an easy to locate area of your home keep flashlights, extra batteries, extra cash, a first aid kit, basic tools, charged cell phones and chargers, and a battery operated radio
  • Make sure you have a seven day supply of prescription medications
  • Have a three day supply of drinking water, one gallon per day per person.
  • Fill a bathtub with water to use to flush toilets
  • Make sure that all of your important documents are kept in a place that is high above ground level. Always keep a copy of these documents with you if there is a need to evacuate
  • Give everyone in your household a list of people they should contact in case of an emergency
  • Have a plan to protect your pets and have extra food for them
  • Prepare to put outdoor furniture away or at least firmly secured

By being prepared and following these tips, you can help keep your home and your loved ones safe from disaster.

For more information, please visit https://www.ready.gov/hurricanes and www.fema.gov

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Sweaty Palms

Having your palms sweat as a nervous response to a stressful situation is something that most people have experienced at some point in their lives, but for some, sweaty palms (or palmar hyperhidrosis), is a chronic condition that can cause great embarrassment and interfere with their day to day existence.

Palmer hyperhidrosis affects approximately 1 and 3 percent of Americans, but researchers believe that this number is low because many are unaware that it is a medical condition and never report it to their doctor.

This condition is part of a family of disorders called primary focal hyperhidrosis, which can affect other parts of the body including the armpits, scalp, and feet. These conditions are usually not caused by an underlying medical issue and are unlike secondary hyperhidrosis, which is characterized by excessive sweating that isn’t isolated to one area of the body and is usually the result of another medical problem.

While the exact cause of palmar hyperhidrosis is still unknown, many believe there is a genetic predisposition as many who have it also report a family history of the condition.

There are many treatment options for palmar hyperhidrosis, including:

  • Topical aluminum chloride – One of the most common treatments for palmar hyperhidrosis. This solution is applied to the palms nightly until the condition improves and then used as needed.
  • Botox injections – This has proven to be an effective treatment for many forms of localized sweating, including the palms. The treatment is FDA-approved, but it can result in temporary weakness in the hands.
  • Iontophoresis – A treatment that involves placing your hands in a shallow bath of water that contains a mild electrical current. This medical device can cost over $500 and may not be covered by all insurers.
  • Medications – Oral prescriptions called anticholinergics are sometimes prescribed if other treatment options aren’t successful, but these medications sometimes cause uncomfortable side effects.
  • Surgery – If all other measures fail, there are procedures where a surgeon can go into the chest and clip the nerves that are responsible for producing sweat. This can be a permanent solution but only used in extreme cases.

Speak to your doctor about what type of treatment option is best for you. If you would like to schedule an appointment with a doctor at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.