What To Expect After You Receive Your Vaccine

Jamaica Hospital would like to provide our community with the facts about what to expect after getting the vaccine.

The most common side effect associated with the COVID vaccine is pain and swelling in your arm at the location of the injection site.

Other side effects reported by some include:

  • Fever
  • Chills
  • Headache
  • Body aches
  • Fatigue

It is important to note that these side effects are normal signs that your body is building protection against the virus. These symptoms typical go away in a few days, but they may affect your ability to participate in your daily activities while you experience them.

If you are experiencing pain, it is recommended that you talk to your doctor about taking over-the-counter medicine, such as ibuprofen, aspirin, antihistamines, or acetaminophen. It is not recommended that you take these medicines before vaccination for the purpose of trying to prevent side effects, because it is not known how these medications may impact how well the vaccine works.

Some tips to alleviate your symptoms include:

  • Apply a clean, cool, wet washcloth over the injection site
  • Use or exercise the arm that received the injection
  • Drink plenty of fluids.
  • Dress lightly

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

COVID-19 Myth or Fact

A very common myth is that Covid-19 affects older people more severely than younger people. The fact is that while older people tend to have more risk factors, people of any age can and do get the virus. A younger person may have a more robust immune system but it will not prevent them from getting the virus. Younger people can be affected just as severely as an older adult.

If you would like to schedule an appointment with a physician at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, you may do so by calling 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Birth Defects

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Birth defects are defined as conditions that are present when a baby is born and can affect nearly every part of the body.  Conditions such as cleft lip can be easily diagnosed.  Other conditions such as deafness or heart defects may only be discovered after diagnostic testing.

The largest number of birth defects occurs during the first three months of gestation. In the U.S. approximately 120,000 babies are born with birth defects each year.

The 10 most common birth defects in the US, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are:

  • Down syndrome
  • Cleft lip (with or without cleft palate)
  • Atrioventricular septal defect (hole in the heart)
  • Absence or malformation of the rectum and/or large intestine
  • Gastroschisis (hole in the abdominal wall)
  • Tetralogy of Fallot (a combination of heart defects)
  • Spina bifida without anencephaly
  • Reduction deformity, upper limbs
  • Reversal of the heart’s two main arteries

Although birth defects can’t always be prevented, there are plenty of steps pregnant women can take to help reduce the risk.

The womenshealth.gov website offers these suggestions:

  • Make regular visits to your doctor throughout pregnancy
  • Get 400mcg of folic acid each day through diet or supplements
  • Don’t smoke, use illegal drugs or drink alcohol while you are pregnant
  • Always check with your doctor before taking any medication
  • Get all vaccinations recommended by your doctor
  • If you have diabetes, keep it under control
  • Stick to a healthy weight

You may also request a pre-pregnancy or early pregnancy screening test in order to spot potential or real birth defects.  The types of tests include a carrier test to see if you or your partner carries potentially harmful genes, as well as screening and diagnostic tests that can determine risks for and detect genetic disorders.

If you are pregnant, or planning to be, and want to discuss your options with one of our doctors, the Women’s Health Center at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center is centrally located and has convenient hours; to make an appointment call 718-291-3276.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

March is National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month

March is Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month
In February 2000, President Clinton dedicated March as National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month. Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of death in the United States today. It is estimated that 140,000 people are diagnosed with this type of cancer each year and about 50,000 die from the disease.

The good news is that the disease is highly preventable by getting a regular screening. The reason that the screenings are so important is because if precancerous polyps are found early, they can be removed and treatment can be started early.
Risk factors for colorectal cancer include:
• Family history
• Precancerous polyps
• Smoking
• People over the age of 50
•  People who have diets high in red meat and processed meat.

It is important to be checked regularly as people get older. For many people who don’t have a family history of colorectal cancer or experience symptoms of the disease, screenings can be started at age 50. If however there is a family history or symptoms exist, screenings should start by age 40 without symptoms or earlier if there are.
Screening for colorectal cancer can be done in several ways.  Some of the more common methods include:
• Checking the stool for occult blood by either a high sensitivity guaiac fecal occult blood test or fecal immunochemical test
• CT colonoscopy
• Colonoscopy
• Sigmoidoscopy

If there is blood present in the stool, or you are experiencing unexplained abdominal pain or weight loss you should consult with your physician immediately.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Should I Let My Child Play Sports During the COVID Pandemic?

As we slowly attempt to return to some degree of normalcy during the COVID pandemic, many activities are beginning to resume, this includes youth sports to be played. Depending on the state or region you live in, your children may now be able to participate in many of the activities that were placed on hold nearly a year ago.

As a parent, it is important to understand the potential risks before deciding to allow your children to play sports.  To help you make an informed decision, Jamaica Hospital is providing the following tips for your consideration:

  • Understand the current COVID-19 positivity rates in your community. Families who live in areas where there is a high or growing number of COVID cases will have an increased risk of contracting the virus. Parents can track positivity rates on their local department of health website.

  • Consider the sport that your child wants to play.  Certain sports, such as wrestling or basketball require players to be in closer proximity to one another. These sports pose an increased risk of exposure as do other sports where there is a high level of physical exertion and those that are played indoors.

  • Assess how much equipment or gear is shared among players.  Even though we know the primary way the virus is spread is from person to person, through droplets in the air, it is still possible to contract COVID by touching a contaminated surface.  For this reason, it is important to limit the use of shared equipment and make sure all gear is sanitized between uses. Never share water bottles.

  • Determine if your child’s team has the ability to socially distance while the players are not actively engaged.  Can the players be placed at the minimum required distance from one another while on the sideline or bench? Are there efforts to have them wear masks when not competing?

Other determining factors that can increase or reduce the risk of spreading the virus include the age of the athlete (older children tend to understand and comply better), the size of the team, the amount of travel required to play the sport and the number of spectators in attendance. By being knowledgeable of the situation you can reduce your child’s exposure and allow them to once again enjoy the sports they love to play.

If your child has any underlying health issues, it is important to speak to your doctor before allowing your child to play.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

#WorkoutWednesday – Low Intensity Running

It is no secret that exercise does wonders for your health.  Running, in particular, offers many benefits, and is known to improve your mental and physical wellbeing.

In a study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, it was found that” five to 10 minutes a day of low-intensity running is enough to extend life by several years.” Similar studies have also indicated that running can help reduce the risks associated with obesity, diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure and some cancers.

Given the benefits, your doctor may recommend that you include running as part of your exercise regimen. If you decide to run, there are a few things you should keep in mind in order to prevent injury and optimize your workout. Here are some running dos and don’ts:

The Do’s:

  • Keep your head up -This will keep your body in alignment and prevent injuries
  • Stretch and warm up-This reduces muscle tightness and increases your range of motion
  • Start slowly -Starting off too fast can lead to overexertion which may result in side aches
  • Schedule rest days –Allow your body days to recover and reduce the risk of exhaustion
  • Remain hydrated- Drinking enough water will prevent dehydration

The Don’ts:

  • Do not run in shoes that are worn or not intended for running- Shoes that are worn or not designed for running may lack support and lead to injuries
  • If running outdoors, do not run with headphones – It is important to be aware of your surroundings and avoid hazards
  • Do not eat big meals before running-Eating too much can slow you down
  • Do not ignore injuries- It is important that you rest if you are injured, not doing so can lead to complications

The most important thing to consider before starting your running routine is to speak with your doctor. Experts recommend that you receive a full medical checkup if you are over the age of 40, have preexisting medical conditions, are obese or have a family history of heart disease.  Your doctor will be able to assess your health and determine if running is best for you.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Employee Spotlight Shines on Karen Codd

This month, we are proud to shine our Employee Spotlight on Karen Codd, Community Wellness Coordinator in the Department of Psychiatry.

Karen has been working at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center since 2015, first as a creative arts therapy extern and then for the past four years and eight months as a full-time creative arts therapist.

Karen is a native of Somerville, New Jersey, where she attended elementary through high school. She then graduated from The College of St. Rose where she obtained her Bachelor of Fine Arts, majoring in Sculpture and minoring in Art History and Photography. She later received a Master of Professional Studies degree in Art Therapy and Creativity Development from the Pratt Institute and is now part of their Graduate Art Therapy faculty. Karen is currently working towards a Doctorate of Art Therapy from Mount Mary University.

Karen has been living in Brooklyn for almost 16 years and shares her home with two cats, Vicky and Trish. In her free time, she enjoys watching movies, playing music, visiting museums and spending time with friends. Travelling the world is also one of her passions; her favorite places visited so far are Chile, Turkey, and India. She likes eating a variety of cuisines from different parts of the globe; however, Asian dishes are her favorite.

According to Karen, being of service to others is her true calling. She is grateful to have the support of her department’s administration which allows her to pursue her passions and research interests. Working at Jamaica Hospital has allowed her to utilize her knowledge of the arts and its therapeutic benefits to help mental health patients during some of the most difficult times in their lives.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Ayshea Beswick-Bailey Shares Her “Jamaica Journey”

Thousands of people work at Jamaica Hospital and each has their own unique story to tell about their career path.  The following is one of them.

Ayshea Beswick-Bailey RN, MSN, PMHNP; Clinical Nurse Manager for Psych-3, began her career journey at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center 17 years ago.

Driven by a strong desire to care for others, Ayshea pursued a career in nursing “I always knew I wanted to be a nurse. As a child I enjoyed helping people and was intrigued by anything related to medicine,” she shared.

In 2003, she joined Jamaica Hospital as a Licensed Practical Nurse on 3-North. After receiving her Bachelor of Science in Nursing from Lehman College, Ayshea honed her clinical expertise by working in various areas of the hospital as a Float Team RN.  Her next career stop was the E.R., where she worked for almost 10 years.  For Ayshea, working in the E.R. was one of her best experiences.  She said there is no limit to what you can learn there.

Ayshea used the knowledge and experience she gained in the E.R. to transition to the Psychiatry department. While working as a Staff Nurse, Ayshea completed the Master of Science program at Hunter College and received her degree as a Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner.

Throughout her journey at Jamaica Hospital, Ayshea has become known by many for her strong work ethic and willingness to go above and beyond. In fact, she was nominated for a G.E.M award which is given to employees who go the extra mile to help patients and colleagues.

In addition to her commitment to providing excellent care to patients, Ayshea credits her professional growth to the support of her mentors and colleagues.  “My first mentor at Jamaica hospital was Linda Hayes, the Assistant Director of Nursing Administration. She always pushed me and believed in me,” she stated. “I am also very grateful that other leaders such as Marge Lilienthal, Liz Garcia, Dr. Daniel Chen, Dr. Martha Edelman and Dr. Meri Nisimova gave me a chance.”

When asked about her overall experience of working at Jamaica Hospital, Ayshea replied, “I know this may sound cliché, but it is the truth, working at Jamaica Hospital has truly been like working with family. My colleagues have been there during the difficult and best times in my life, including my dad’s cancer diagnosis and recovery, as well as the birth of my kids, two of which I had at this hospital.”

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Should You Get a Flu Vaccine During the Pandemic?

Many people have asked whether or not they should get the flu shot during this year’s pandemic. According to medical experts, the answer is yes. There are a few very good reasons why getting a flu shot is the correct approach to protecting yourself. These include:

Getting influenza can weaken the body’s defenses and make it more susceptible to other illnesses, including Covid-19.

Since many of the symptoms of influenza and Covid-19 are similar, helping the body to fight off influenza can potentially make Covid-19 less severe.

Wearing a mask and social distancing have the potential to lessen our risk of contracting influenza as well as Covid-19, however these measures aren’t foolproof. A vaccine that will help lower the risk of getting seriously ill offers an added layer of protection..

Getting a flu vaccine during the pandemic may also help to prevent the spread of influenza to others.

It is possible to have the flu and Covid-19 at the same time; however, getting vaccinated can help lessen the severity of certain complications.

If you have any questions about getting one or both of these vaccines, consult with your physician to see if it is appropriate in your individual case. To schedule an appointment with a physician at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-7001

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

National Toothache Day

National Toothache Day occurs each year on February 9th. In honor of this observation, we are sharing a few remedies to get temporary relief from a minor toothache.

Here are a few:

  • Saltwater rinse- Saltwater is a natural antibacterial agent.  Mix 1/2 teaspoon (tsp) of salt into a glass of warm water and use it as a mouthwash-do not swallow. This may help to reduce inflammation.
  • Hydrogen peroxide rinse- Mix 3% hydrogen peroxide with equal parts water and use it as a mouthwash- do not swallow.  This can help to relieve pain and reduce inflammation. A hydrogen peroxide rinse is not suitable for children because there is a risk that may swallow the solution.
  • Peppermint tea bags- According to WebMD, “A cooled peppermint tea bag may soothe your aching tooth and gums.”

Please keep in mind that these are short-term solutions. It is recommended that you see a dentist as soon as possible to determine the cause of your toothache and get the proper treatment.

To schedule an appointment with a dentist at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-6980.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.