Ruptured Eardrum

The tympanic membrane or eardrum is a very important part of our ear.  This thin layer of tissue which divides the outer ear canal and middle ear helps to transmit sound vibrations. It also helps to protect the middle ear from foreign objects such as water or bacteria.

A rupture or tear of the eardrum can lead to serious complications such as hearing loss or infections of the middle ear.

There are a number of things that can cause our eardrums to rupture. They include:

  • Ear infections -When the middle ear is infected, this can result in fluid accumulating behind the eardrum.  Pressure from this buildup can cause the tympanic membrane to break.
  • Barotrauma- This occurs when there is a change in pressure. If the pressure inside the ear is drastically different from that outside the ear, this can lead to perforation. An example of this is when an airplane changes altitude causing air pressure in the cabin to rise or fall.
  • Direct trauma to the ear or side of the head- These injuries can be sustained from an ear slap or falling on the ear.
  • Acoustic trauma – A sudden, loud noise or blast such as an explosion can produce sound waves that are powerful enough to cause injury.
  • Foreign objects- Inserting objects such as a cotton swab or hairpin into the ear canal can puncture the eardrum.

Pain is the most common symptom of an eardrum rupture; however, you may also experience:

  • Ringing or buzzing in the ear
  • Dizziness or vertigo
  • Drainage of pus or fluid from the ear
  • Hearing loss

It is important that you see a doctor if any of these symptoms occur.   An Ear, Nose and Throat (ENT) doctor can determine if you have a ruptured eardrum by using an otoscope to conduct an inspection.  Additional testing can include, audiology exams, a tuning fork evaluation or tympanometry which measures the response of the eardrum to slight changes in air pressure.

According to Jamaica Hospital ENT specialist Dr. Sandra Ho, a ruptured eardrum can usually heal on its own. Depending on the reason for the perforation, painkillers and/or antibiotics may help during the healing process. However, if it does not heal in a few weeks, your ENT may recommend an eardrum patch. This procedure involves a doctor placing a medicated paper patch over the hole.  In some cases, surgery may be required to repair the perforated eardrum. This procedure is known as a tympanoplasty which involves taking tissue from another part of the body and grafting it onto the hole in the eardrum.

To schedule an appointment with Dr. Sandra Ho or other ENT specialists at Jamaica Hospital, please call 718-206-7110

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

The Difference Between the Flu and Covid-19

Flu season has arrived in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, and for many it will be difficult to differentiate characteristics of the flu from those of COVID because they are very similar. Both can cause fever, body aches, a dry cough or fatigue.

While there are similarities shared between the two illnesses, there are a few key differences people should be aware of. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC):

  • Signs and symptoms of COVID-19, different from flu, may include change in or loss of taste or smell.
  • If a person has COVID-19, it could take them longer to develop symptoms than if they had flu. Typically, a person with the flu develops symptoms anywhere from 1 to 4 days after infection. Symptoms of COVID usually develop 5 days after being infected, but symptoms can appear as early as 2 days after infection or as late as 14 days after infection, and the time range can vary.
  • If a person has COVID-19, they may be contagious for a longer period of time than if they had flu. Most people with flu are contagious for about 1 day before they show symptoms.

Older children and adults with flu appear to be most contagious during the initial 3-4 days of their illness but many remain contagious for about 7 days. For those with COVID, it is possible that they can spread the virus for about 2 days before experiencing signs or symptoms and remain contagious for at least 10 days after signs or symptoms first appeared.

Protecting your health from the flu and COVID is crucial because symptoms resulting from these viruses can lead to life-threatening complications. This can be achieved by getting a flu shot and following safety precautions such as practicing proper hand hygiene, wearing a mask and sanitizing frequently used surfaces.

If you are experiencing any of the symptoms associated with the flu or COVID-19, please consult your doctor about being tested for the coronavirus. To schedule an appointment with a doctor at Jamaica Hospital please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

This Month We Shine Our Employee Spotlight on Joel Louis

This month we shine our Employee Spotlight on Joel Louis a security officer at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center

Joel Louis has been a security officer at Jamaica Hospital for five years. He was born and raised in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic. After graduating in the early 1990’s with a Master’s Degree in fashion from the Mercy Jaquez School in the Dominican Republic he decided he wanted to come to the United States to pursue career opportunities.

Joel comes from a very tight knit family. He enjoys spending time with them, especially his son who he considers to be a miracle child because of how difficult it was for his wife to conceive. In his free time he enjoys drawing and sewing. He enjoys dining out, going to see movies that are comedies and when possible, going to fashion events. He also hopes to complete the book he is writing which he entitled “Reason to Live”.

Joel currently resides in Richmond Hill which he likes because it feels like a nice community. Working at Jamaica Hospital also feels like a community to him and he takes pride in contributing to its well-being by keeping everyone safe.  As part of his goal to ensure the safety of others, Joel made over 2,000 masks which he donated to healthcare facilities including ours. He looks forward to many more years at the hospital and we are happy to shine the spotlight on him this month.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

The History of Eye Glasses

Over 60 percent of the adult population in the United States today wears eyeglasses. Modern day eyeglasses have their roots that date back more than 1000 years. In the middle ages Monks were known to use reading stones that were glass spheres, sometimes filled with water,  that were placed on top of objects in order to magnify them. The first documented use of eyeglasses was attributed to being developed in Italy.  In the 13th century Venetian glass blowers made the first solid glass lenses that were held by frames and that were a primitive version of modern day wearable eyeglasses.
In the 17th century eyeglasses started to be made that could correct vision. Glasses could be made with either concave lenses, for nearsightedness, or convex lenses for farsightedness. Benjamin Franklin invented bifocal lenses in 1784. Glass was the material used in the production of eyeglasses for centuries until the latter part of the 20th century when plastic became widely used in eyeglasses as it was lighter and safer than glass. Now many eyeglasses are being made from polycarbonate which is lighter still and more resilient to scratches.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

September is National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month

The month of September has been designated as National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month to bring attention to this very common form of cancer that affects so many men. Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed form of cancer in men and is the second leading cancer related cause of death in men. Although it is not known exactly what causes prostate cancer some risk factors for developing it are:

  •  Older age (more than 65% of prostate cancers are diagnosed in men older than 65)
  • Race (African-American men are 60% more likely to develop prostate cancer than Caucasian men)
  • Family history (having a father or brother with prostate cancer)
  • Obesity

The prostate gland is a part of the male reproductive system that produces a fluid that mixes with sperm and other fluids during ejaculation. It sits just below the bladder and is normally about the side of a walnut.

Prostate cancer, especially in its early stages, may not have any symptoms. When symptoms are present they may include difficulty starting urination, less force to the stream of urine, dribbling at the end of urination, needing to urinate frequently, urinating frequently at night, pain while urinating, blood in the urine or semen, difficulty starting or maintaining an erection, pain with ejaculation, pain or stiffness in the lower back, hips, pelvis and upper thighs, or unintended weight loss.

When screening is done there are two tests that are available. The available tests are a digital rectal exam (DRE) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test.  To perform a digital rectal exam your doctor uses a gloved finger, inserted a few inches into your rectum, to check your prostate gland.  A prostate-specific antigen test is a blood test that measures the level of PSA in your blood.  Many men who have prostate cancer have elevated levels of PSA, however PSA can also be elevated for less serious causes such as prostate enlargement or infection.

Further testing is needed to diagnose cancer. Additional tests that your doctor may recommend to diagnose cancer include an ultrasound of the prostate and a biopsy of the prostate.  A biopsy is when a small piece of the prostate is removed to look for abnormal cells.

Treatment of prostate cancer depends on many factors including your age, your overall health and the growth and spread of the cancer when it is diagnosed. Some men who have slow growing tumors may not need treatment right away and some may never need treatment.  Other types of prostate cancer are aggressive and can quickly spread to other parts of the body making treatment difficult.  Common treatment options include watchful waiting or expectant management (regular testing and checkups to assess for new signs or symptoms), radiation therapy (high-energy x-rays used to kill cancer cells), chemotherapy, surgery (having the prostate gland removed) and hormone therapy.

To schedule an appointment with a physician at Jamaica Hospital to discuss a prostate cancer screening, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Suicide Prevention- Pay Attention to The Signs

Suicide prevention-467918329Over 1 million Americans attempt suicide each year. It is the 10th leading cause of death in the United States.

Most people who committed suicide had treatable mental health disorders that went unnoticed.

Suicide can be prevented if the signs of mental health disorders are recognized and addressed immediately.

Here are a few warning signs of suicide we should not ignore:

  • Feelings of hopelessness
  • Self-loathing
  • Changes in sleep patterns; which can either be excessive sleep or a deprivation of sleep
  • Irritability or anger
  • Talking about harming themselves
  • Loss of interest in daily activities or things they were once passionate about
  • Reckless behavior
  • Increasing use of alcohol or drugs
  • A preoccupation with death
  • Getting their affairs in order in preparation for death
  • Verbalizing thoughts such as “ Everyone will be better without me”  or “I  have nothing  to live for”
  • Visiting or calling people to say goodbye

If someone you know exhibits the following behaviors, do not dismiss them as a passing phase. These actions are a cry for help.

It is important to let your loved one know that you have recognized changes in their behavior, they are not alone and you are there to support them through this difficult time.  Speak openly about what they are feeling and ensure them they will not be judged because they feel suicidal.  Seek the help of a mental health professional immediately.  Insist on accompanying this person to their consultation or treatment. Continue to demonstrate your support during treatment by reminding them to take prescribed medications, keeping up with physician appointments and encouraging a positive lifestyle.

If you or someone you know is having suicidal thoughts or demonstrating suicidal behaviors, get help immediately. Call 911, 1-800-SUICIDE, or 1-800-273-TALK

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Bed Wetting

Most children are completely potty trained by the age of 5 , but since we cannot determine a date when the bladder will completely develop, the statistical normal age range should be between 5 and 7 years old. However, if your child is between the ages of 5 and 7 years old and continues to have bed wetting “accidents” it may be typical or it may be an indication of other issues.

Some common medical issues that may cause bed-wetting may be that your child’s bladder is under developed or small, a hormone imbalance, a urinary tract infection, diabetes, sleep apnea or chronic constipation.

According to the Mayo Clinic, a parent or guardian should become concerned about their childs bed wetting when:

  1. Your child still wets the bed after age 7
  2. Your child starts to wet the bed after a few months of being dry at night
  3. The bed-wetting is accompanied by painful urination, unusual thirst, pink or red urine, hard stools, or snoring

Although your childs bed-wetting can be frustrating, there could be a great deal of embarassment and low self esteem associated with the condition. If the condition persists, visit to you doctor would be indicated.

If you’d like to make an appointment for your child to be examined at the Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Could Stress Be Causing You Crisis Fatigue ?

Crisis fatigue can be defined as how a person reacts to long term stress with feelings of being very tired or numbness to the world around them.

The events of the past few months have caused many of us overwhelming emotions which include depression, sadness, anxiety, and fear. The body’s response to stressful circumstances is to produce the hormones cortisol and adrenaline. When stressful circumstances persist for long periods of time, these higher level of these hormones can lead to depression, anxiety, weight gain, bone loss or high blood pressure. In some cases crisis fatigue can lead to substance abuse, alcoholism and suicidal thoughts.

The signs and symptoms of crisis fatigue include:

  • Increased irritability
  • Excessive emotional responses
  • Lack of sleep
  • Changes in normal routines
  • Changes in appetite

Some of the ways a person can cope during these uncertain times is to learn how to reduce the level of stress in their life by:

  • Reducing the amount of time spent on social media
  • Limiting exposure to news reports
  • Spending more time with family and friends
  • Practicing meditation and yoga
  • Finding activities that are calming like reading, listening to music, and crafts

It isn’t always easy to cope with stressful situations without professional help. If you are experiencing any long term effects, you may benefit by speaking to a mental health professional. You can schedule an appointment with a trained professional at Jamaica Hospital by calling 718-206-7160.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Kale Salad

With Autumn arriving and our backyard grills safely packed away, we have provided a great kale salad recipe from allrecipies.com to compliment any fall meal choice.

 “If you slice kale thin and toss it with other tasty treats like apple, persimmon, orange, and nuts, the kale mellows out and serves as a perfect foil for other vegetation.” Chef John

 For the entire recipe please follow the link to – 

For this and more delicious recipes visit – http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Chef-Johns-Raw-Kale-Salad/Detail.aspx?evt19=1

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month

September is National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month – an observance that coincides with the return of children to the classroom. This convergence of events leads many parents to ask one question, “how can I ensure that my child receives a nutritious diet now that they are back in school?”

Obesity rates among children have tripled over the past three decades. It’s now estimated that  approximately 18% of children living in the United States are classified as obese. It is also estimated that children who are obese are ten times more likely to become obese as adults than other children. Since most children consume half of their daily caloric intake while in school, concentrating on providing them with a healthy and balanced diet while they are there is essential in the battle against obesity.

For many parents, the decision of whether to pack lunch from home or buy lunch from school is a difficult one. Some parents question the nutritional value of school lunches. Parents who have this concern should know that in recent years, schools have implemented new standards for the nutritional value of meals to align with U.S. dietary guidelines. Processed lunches that used to be high in fat, sugar, and sodium have been replaced with meals that meet or exceed national standards. School meals now also feature a variety of fruits and vegetables, whole grains, and low or fat-free milk.

For those who still opt to pack their child’s lunch, they can improve their child’s diet and reduce their chances of becoming obese by following some simple tips:

  • Choose whole wheat breads instead of white bread when making sandwiches
  • Use fresh fruits instead of canned or processed alternatives
  • Fill a sandwich bag with something other than a sandwich. There are many other food options for your kids to snack on, such as carrots, nuts, granola, or raisins.
  • Initiate a salad day. Prepare the basics the night before and have your child choose some toppings including sliced chicken or turkey or low-fat cheese.
  • Introduce wraps as an option to a boring old sandwich. Give it extra flavor by coating with a low-fat spread and fill it with lettuce and protein.  You can cut the wrap into pinwheel slices for fun.
  • Invest in a thermos and fill it up with mac and cheese or your child’s favorite soup, stew or pasta.
  • Encourage your child to drink plenty of water instead of sugary juice boxes or soda. Sugary drinks are considered one of the leading causes of childhood obesity.

Whether your child buys or packs lunch, it’s important to stay involved. Talk to them about what food choices they made and discuss the many benefits eating a healthy diet has on both their mind and body.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.