MediSys Family Care Center in Howard Beach

This month, we would like to shine our spotlight on the MediSys Family Care Center in Howard Beach.

This center moved into its current location at 156-10 Crossbay Blvd in 2011, after having been one block south on Crossbay Boulevard since 1995. This site currently offers seven state-of-the-art exam rooms and is staffed by 13 employees.

The MediSys Family Care Center in Howard Beach offers a wide range of services including:

  • Internal Medicine
  • Pediatrics
  • Podiatry
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Neurology

The staff shares with us why they enjoy working at MediSys Howard Beach. Dr. Lawrence Marino enjoys working at this office and tells us “I have been privileged to be part of this community for the past 30 years and ever more privileged to work with such a dedicated team”. Nilsa Valentine a Patient Access Representative in this practice says, “I have been working for the past 21 years in MediSys Howard  Beach. The patients have become more than just an appointment. We treat them like family which makes for a great relationship. My team in this office has given me the care and support that I appreciate so very much”. Keven Ogando, an Ambulatory Care Representative at this office states that, “throughout my year of working here I enjoyed how kind and helpful my coworkers have been”.

The current hours of operation are:

Monday – Thursday  7:00 AM – 7:00 PM

Friday and Saturday 8:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Free parking is available in the rear of the building. The site is also accessible by public transportation using the Q41, Q52, and Q53 buses.

To schedule an appointment at Medisys Family Care Center in Howard Beach please call 718-323-3589.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Causes of Watery Eyes

There are a number of ailments that can cause your eyes to be watery.  The three most common causes are a cold, allergies and Dry Eye Syndrome. The most common medical cause being, Dry Eye Syndrome.

According to healthline.com some other causes of watery eye could be:

  • weather conditions such as dusty weather, wind, cold, and sunshine
  • environmental factors such as bright light and smog
  • inflammation of the eyelid 
  • eyelid turned outward or inward 
  • ingrown eyelash 
  • pink eye  or other infections
  • injury, such as a cut or scrape on the eye
  • some prescription medications

(to see the entire list of common causes, visit healthline.com)

According to the American Optometric Association, some symptoms affiliated with watery eyes or Dry Eye Syndrome are:

  • Gritty, irritated, scratchy or burning eyes
  • The feeling of something in the eyes
  • Excess watering
  • Blurred vision

Watery eyes can develop for a number of reasons including medical conditions such as diabetes and thyroid disease, aging, your gender or certain medications you are taking that can reduce tear production.

In mild cases, symptoms can often me managed using over the counter artificial tear solutions.

In either case, if symptoms persist you should seek medical attention.  If you are experiencing prolonged symptoms and would like to make an appointment to see one of our doctors, please call the Jamaica Hospital Medical Center Ambulatory Care Center at 718-206-7001 for an appointment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

The Importance of Sleep in Children

According to a recent report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), more than one-third of children (4 months- 17 years) living in the United States, get less sleep than what is recommended for their ages.

The American Academy of Sleep Medicine recommends:

• Infants 4 months to 12 months should sleep 12 to 16 hours per 24 hours

• Children 1 to 2 years of age should sleep 11 to 14 hours per 24 hours

• Children 3 to 5 years of age should sleep 10 to 13 hours per 24 hours

• Children 6 to 12 years of age should sleep 9 to 12 hours per 24 hours

• Teenagers 13 to 18 years of age should sleep 8 to 10 hours per 24 hours

A lack of sleep can affect children in several ways. Children who do not receive adequate sleep are at a higher risk for developing health conditions such as type 2 diabetes, poor mental health, and obesity.  Sleep deprivation can also contribute to the development of behavioral or academic problems.

There are several ways parents can help children achieve a good night’s sleep. This includes:

  • Turning off devices at least an hour before bedtime
  • Ensuring beds are comfortable
  • Creating a consistent bedtime routine (changing into pajamas, brushing teeth, etc.)
  • Establishing and keeping a consistent sleep schedule (This includes weekends and vacations)
  • Keeping children from going to bed hungry or too full
  • Avoiding scary movies, books or television shows before bed
  • Helping to alleviate bedtime fears or anxieties by talking about them and providing comfort

It is important that children receive adequate sleep as it is beneficial for their overall health and development. If your child is consistently having problems falling or staying asleep despite practicing healthy sleep hygiene, you should consult a doctor.

To schedule an appointment with a sleep specialist at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-5916.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Can you get a flu vaccine at the same time as a COVID-19 vaccine ?

According to information published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the answer is yes. The CDC tells us that you can get a COVID-19 vaccine and a flu vaccine at the same time.

Even though both vaccines can be given at the same visit, people should follow the recommended schedule for either vaccine: If you haven’t gotten your currently recommended doses of COVID-19 vaccine, get a COVID-19 vaccine as soon as you can, and ideally get a flu vaccine by the end of October.

While limited data exist on giving COVID-19 vaccines with other vaccines, including flu vaccines, experience with giving other vaccines together has shown the way our bodies develop protection and possible side effects are generally similar whether vaccines are given alone or with other vaccines.

If you have concerns about getting both vaccines at the same time, you should speak with a health care provider.

For further information regarding the Covid vaccine you can visit the CDC website at https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/faq.html

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Patient Story: What Started Out As a Mild Headache Quickly Turned Into A Medical Emergency.

While going about his usual routine on a warm summer day, Norbert Silva began to experience a mild headache.  As the day progressed, his symptoms grew more severe.  Hoping desperately to find some relief, Mr. Silva decided to take a few painkillers but still, the pain intensified.

Shortly after, Mr. Silva began to vomit. His body was warning him that something was terribly wrong. He immediately went to a local hospital to seek medical attention.

Following a thorough examination, it was decided by doctors to transfer Mr. Silva to Jamaica Hospital Medical Center to further investigate a suspected tumor. “I remember feeling nervous, everything was happening so fast,” shared Mr. Silva.

Upon his arrival at Jamaica Hospital, the E.R. team worked quickly to conduct a series of diagnostic tests. It was discovered that Mr. Silva developed a large tumor in the brain which was compressing his optic and oculomotor nerves.  “Throughout this process, the staff made it a priority to keep me informed and as comfortable as they could,” said Mr. Silva.

Shortly after this discovery was made, Mr. Silva realized that his vision was becoming blurry, he was rapidly losing the ability to see and move his right eye. “I was scared but all I could think about was my family. Thinking of them helped me to build up my courage,” he said.  

Neurosurgeon Dr. Amrit Chiluwal was consulted to further assess Mr. Silva’s condition and it was determined that surgery should be performed right away. “Dr. Chiluwal visited me and explained why I needed surgery and what to expect. I felt confident that he would take good care of me,” said Mr. Silva.

Mr. Silva’s surgery was performed by Dr. Chiluwal and fellow neurosurgeons Dr. Shamik Chakraborty and Dr. Mohsen Nouri.  The operation was successful thanks to the physicians’ expert training. “Our goal was the remove the tumor from the brain and decompress the nerves safely and in the least invasive manner possible,” shared Dr. Chiluwal. “Within 24 hours after surgery the patient’s vision was back to normal and he was able to move his right eye normally.”

Mr. Silva had a positive recovery in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). He said, “Everyone involved in my care treated me well.  The nurses in the ICU were amazing.  Dr. Chiluwal came to see me in the day and night. He’s a nice guy, a great doctor.”

Mr. Silva was released from the hospital just in time to celebrate his birthday. “I thank Dr. Chiluwal and the entire team for giving me the opportunity to celebrate another year of my life. I got to go home and see my family,” shared Mr. Silva,

Today, life is back to normal for Mr. Silva. He reports that his vision is now better than it was before and that he cherishes each day. His advice to others is to listen to their bodies and “don’t delay going to the E.R. if something does not feel right.”

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Down Syndrome Awareness Month

October is Down Syndrome Awareness Month and Jamaica Hospital Medical Center is spreading awareness by sharing important facts about the disorder with our community.

Down syndrome, also called Trisomy 21, is the most common chromosomal condition in the United States. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), approximately one in every 700 babies in the U.S.  is born with Down syndrome.  

Typically, at the time of conception, a fetus receives genetic information from both parents in the form of 46 chromosomes.  Down syndrome occurs when the fetus receives an extra copy of a chromosome; resulting in 47 chromosomes.  This extra chromosome affects the way a baby develops physically and mentally.   Some of the physical features and developmental problems associated with Down syndrome include:

  • Flattened face
  • Small head
  • Upward slanting eyelids
  • Unusually shaped or small ears
  • Protruding tongue
  • Short height
  • Language delay
  • Mild to moderate cognitive impairment

Every baby born with Down syndrome is different.  Each child will have physical or intellectual disabilities that are unique to their condition.  Parents of babies born with Down syndrome are advised to enroll their children into early- intervention services such as speech therapy or occupational therapy as soon as possible.  These services can help to encourage or accelerate the child’s development.

The most commonly known risk factor linked to Down syndrome is a mother’s age.  Women over the age of 35 have a significantly higher risk of having a child with this condition.  Those with an increased risk are encouraged to consult a genetic counselor to discuss screening options.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Our Employee Spotlight Shines on Pearlette Edionwe

This month we are proud to shine our Employee Spotlight on Pearlette Edionwe, RN, BSN, MSN, who has been working at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center for 14 years and currently serves as Assistant Head Nurse on 3 North.

Pearlette is a native of Trelawny, Jamaica, West Indies. She attended Bohemia All Age Elementary School and  Christiana Secondary High School before coming to the United States at the age of 25. Her first job was as a babysitter on Long Island. Following that she worked for the Cerebral Palsy Association of New York while studying to become an LPN. She received her Associate’s Degree in Nursing at Eastwick College of New Jersey and then obtained her Bachelor of Science degree in Nursing at Grand Canyon University in Phoenix Arizona. While working at Jamaica Hospital as the Assistant Head Nurse on 3 North, she obtained her Masters Of Science degree in Nursing with an emphasis on Leadership in Healthcare Systems.

Pearlette currently lives in Freeport, Long Island. She has three children of whom she is very proud of. In her free time she enjoys reading, crocheting, gardening, watching track and field events, basketball and listening to gospel music. She also enjoys spending time with her family and friends.  Pearlette always makes time for her Maltipoo named Theodore Cornelius Edionwe. Her favorite places to travel to are Paris, and the Island of Jamaica. Pearlette tells us that her favorite foods are those that are home cooked.

Pearlette’s calling is taking care of patients who she strives to give the best possible care. She enjoys working with the team on her unit to accomplish this goal. She is proud to be a part of the Jamaica Hospital family because they are supportive and kind. We are proud to have her as a member of our team and look forward to her working with us for many more years.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

MediSys Family Medicine Center in Richmond Hill

With much fanfare in 1998, Jamaica Hospital Medical Center opened the doors to the  MediSys Family Medicine Center in Richmond Hill, located at 133-03 Jamaica Avenue and home to the Family Medicine program. Present at the ribbon cutting was the staff of the center and members of the  hospital’s  administration. Also joining them at this momentous occasion was  Dr. David Satcher, the former Surgeon General of the United States.

The staff at this modern facility treats over 24,000 patients each year and the site offers 33 exam rooms, four procedure rooms and four family rooms. Some of the services offered at MediSys Richmond Hill are:  primary care, cardiology, gastroenterology, podiatry, dermatology, allergy, nutrition, osteopathic manipulative treatment, sports medicine, palliative care and integrative health.

Dr. Radeeb Akhtar, an Attending Physician at the Family Medicine Center shares why he enjoys being at the center for the past four years  is because “it is an excellent team, providing high quality primary care for a wonderful culturally rich patient population”.  Rovina Rabindranauth has been a Patient Care Representative for six years and she states that “working with people from different cultures and helping them to get excellent medical care” is what she values about this center. Stephanie Kearney who has been an Ambulatory Care Representative at the center for 12 years explains that “the staff at this center works together as a team and always puts patients first”.

The hours of operation are Monday to Friday 8:00 AM – 4:00 PM and Saturday from 8:00 AM to 1:00 PM. The site offers parking for patients in the rear of the building and is also accessible by public transportation (buses Q56, Q24, and the E train). 

If you would like to schedule an appointment with one of our physicians at the MediSys Family Medicine Center Richmond Hill, please call 718-657-7093.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Dental Screenings for Infants

When is the appropriate time to begin dental screenings for infants? An infant is defined as a baby between birth and one year of age. The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) recommends that infants see the dentist for their first dental exam within six months of getting their first tooth or by their first birthday.

Dr. Deborah Pasquale, Chairperson of the Department of Dentistry at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center makes the following suggestions on how to prepare for the first dental exam:

  • Make sure the infant is well rested the night prior
  • Schedule a morning appointment when the infant is most likely to be well rested and alert
  • Make the visit to the dental specialist a positive experience
  • Give the dentist the infant’s medical history
  • Bring the infant’s favorite toy or blanket to make them feel comfortable

During the exam, the dentist will evaluate the infant for proper gum and tooth development. If necessary, the dentist will gently clean the gums and any teeth that are present. Flouride treatment may also be recommended. To help protect the infant’s teeth at home the dentist will instruct parents on how to properly clean teeth and gums, as well as make suggestions on proper nutrition.

Jamaica Hospital’s pediatric dental center is ultra modern and provides comprehensive dental services for children in a welcoming environment. If you would like to schedule an appointment with a pediatric dentist, please call 718-206-6980

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

COVID SYMPTOMS IN CHILDREN

According to the Mayo Clinic, children of all ages can become ill with coronavirus disease (COVID-19). But most kids who are infected typically don’t become as sick as adults and some might not show any symptoms at all.

Children and adults experience similar symptoms of COVID-19, children’s symptoms tend to be mild and cold-like. Most children recover within one to two weeks. Possible symptoms can include:

  • Fever or chills
  • Nasal congestion or runny nose
  • Cough
  • Sore throat
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
  • Fatigue
  • Headache
  • Muscle aches or body aches
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Poor feeding or poor appetite
  • New loss of taste or smell
  • Belly pain

To determine whether your child has COVID-19, a test using a long-stemmed swab can be administered by a medical professional.  If the test is positive for COVID, it is recommended that you teat mild symptoms such as fever and body aches with acetaminophen or ibuprofen.  Be sure to follow the appropriate guidelines for dosages. Additionally, make sure your child gets plenty of fluids and rest.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.