Jamaica Hospital Recognizes National Don’t Fry Day

The Friday before Memorial Day is designated National Don’t Fry Day – a day to raise awareness about sun safety and encourage everyone to take the necessary steps to protect their skin from cancer.

Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer in the nation, with almost 5.5 million cases diagnosed in Americans each year – more than breast, colon, lung and prostate cancers combined.  In fact, one out of every five Americans will be diagnosed with skin cancer at some time in their lives.

Jamaica Hospital and the American Cancer Society would like to share the following tips to avoid frying in the sun this summer:

  • Seek shade during the peak time of day – the sun is at its strongest between 10:00am – 2:00 pm
  • Dress properly – Wear sun-protective clothing as well as UV blocking sunglasses and wide-brimmed hats
  • Use sunscreen – It is recommended that you apply sunscreen that is at least SPF 30 every 2 hours
  • Avoid tanning devices – These give-off UVA rays just like the sun.

By following these tips, you and your family can enjoy the sun, while protecting yourself from the harm that it can cause

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

BBQ Leftover Chicken Receipe

When you barbeque, you always seem to prepare more food than you need. Of course, this will leave you with leftovers more often than not. So what do you do with all that extra chicken?

If you are planning on finishing off your leftover chicken within a few days, wrap it tightly and keep it in the refrigerator. If you want to keep it for more than a few days, wrap the chicken in foil and seal it in a zip lock bag. Try to get as much air as possible out of the bag to preserve the leftovers for several months.

Take precaution when you are reheating your leftovers.  You do not have to reheat it on as low a temperature and slowly as you did the first time.  An oven temperature of around 325 degrees will work great. Do not overcook your chicken.  Overcooking can cause the chicken to become dry.

Properly reheated, your barbecued chicken should be just about as good as it was the day you first cooked it.

Now that we have discussed how to preserve your BBQ chicken, here’s a great way to reheat that chicken. Click the link below and follow the simple recipe that will take your leftover chicken and make it appear like an entirely different meal!

http://addapinch.com/cooking/bbq-chicken-bites-recipe/

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Travel and Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT)

Deep Vein ThrombosisMemorial Day weekend includes some of the busiest days for travel. Millions will travel great distances by car, rail or plane to their desired vacation destinations. Despite the mode of transportation, people often spend an extensive amount of time sitting while in transit.  This prolonged period of inactivity can lead to the formation of blood clots or complications such as deep vein thrombosis (DVT).

Deep vein thrombosis, dubbed “Economy Class Syndrome” or “Traveler’s Thrombosis,” occurs when a blood clot forms in the veins of the leg, obstructing the flow of blood to the heart. Clots are more likely to develop when legs are hanging down, causing blood to flow slowly and collect. Anyone flying or driving for four hours or more without mobilization are at risk for developing them.

Symptoms of DVT can be mild and may include swelling of the calf or long-term discomfort. However, symptoms can also be fatal as deep vein thrombosis can develop into a more severe, sometimes fatal condition known as pulmonary embolism.

Pulmonary embolisms form when blood clots travel from the veins in the legs and eventually becomes lodged in the blood vessels going to the lungs.  Symptoms include chest pains, difficulty breathing, feeling lightheaded or fainting, coughing up blood, anxiety or irregular heartbeat. If these symptoms present themselves, medical attention should be sought immediately.

Some people are more prone to developing deep vein thrombosis- related conditions than others.  Those with an increased risk include people who are obese, over the age of 40, have varicose veins, a family history of blood clots, are using contraceptives such as birth control containing estrogen, have had recent surgery, hormone replacement therapy, recent severe illnesses such as pneumonia, recent cancer treatment and have limited mobility due to a leg cast.

There are many steps one can take to reduce risks.   While traveling during a long journey, it is recommended to wear comfortable and loose clothing, take breaks and walk around whenever you can, drink water, purchase flight socks, do not drink excessive amounts of alcohol or take sleeping pills. It also highly advised to take a walk after a long trip to get your circulation going.

 

 

 

 

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Ways To Prevent Heart Disease

Heart Health Queens

Cardiovascular disease is a general term that describes a wide range of conditions that affect your heart’s ability to function normally and pump blood to the rest of your body.

If your heart is not working properly, it can lead to serious complications such as heart attack or stroke.

There are several risk factors that can increase your chances of developing complications associated with cardiovascular disease. Some factors such as age or family history are non-modifiable, meaning they cannot be changed. However, there are others that are modifiable and can be changed to lower your risk of developing disease. Modifiable risk factors include tobacco use, lack of exercise, stress, a poor diet and medication adherence. Here are some tips on how you can reduce these risks and prevent heart disease:

1. Exercise Regularly – The American Heart Association recommends including 30 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise, 5 days a week, in your routine. This will help to keep your heart muscle strong.
2. Eat Healthy – Make sure to eat lots of vegetables, fruits and whole grains. Avoid fatty foods and salt. One of the recommended diets to help prevent heart disease is the DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diet.
3. Stop Smoking – Smoking can damage your blood vessels and raise your blood pressure which increases your chances of having a heart attack.
4. Reduce Your Stress – Stress can also raise your blood pressure and put a strain on your heart. One of the ways to reduce stress is practicing relaxation techniques such as meditation or yoga. If you feel your stress is too much to handle on your own, talk to your primary care doctor or a mental health professional.
5. Properly Manage Other Medical Conditions – Having high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes put you at a much greater risk for heart disease. Make sure you take medications that your doctor prescribed to manage these conditions.

Making an appointment for an annual physical with your primary care doctor can also lower your risk. Annual visits can help your doctor detect the early signs of heart disease. Your doctor can talk to you about your risk factors and help you to begin living and maintaining a heart-healthy lifestyle. You should see a doctor immediately if you begin to experience symptoms such as chest pain, fainting, shortness of breath or irregular heartbeat. These are often indicators of serious heart-related problems that require urgent medical attention.

To speak with a Family Medicine doctor about heart disease, please call (718) 206-6942.

Nikki Joseph D.O.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Diabetes and the Myths that go with it.

Diabetes is a serious illness. It affects 30 million people in the United States. There are many facts that we know about the disease, and not surprisingly, many myths associated with it as well.

 

 

Some of these myths include:

  • You can catch diabetes from someone else. False  Diabetes is not contagious
  • People with diabetes catch more colds and other illnesses. False. Diabetics aren’t any more at risk for catching a cold than anyone else.
  • People with diabetes can’t eat sugar. False. Sugar should be consumed in small quantities as part of a balanced meal.
  • Only overweight  people get diabetes. False. A  person can be slim, medium build or heavy and still be a diabetic.
  • People who have diabetes shouldn’t drive. False. People with diabetes can do  anything a person who doesn’t have diabetes does.
  • Type II diabetes is not as serious as Type I. False. Every form of diabetes is to be taken seriously. It is just treated differently.
  • Nobody in my family has diabetes therefore I won’t get it. False. While it does run in families, anyone is at risk regardless of family history.
  • Borderline diabetes is not real diabetes. False. It may only mean you are at higher risk of developing diabetes.
  • Eating fruit is bad for diabetes. False. Fruit should be eaten in small portions. Excessive amounts may cause a problem because fruit contains carbohydrates.

Speak to your physician if you would like to clarify the facts about diabetes and your ability to do things. You can schedule an appointment with a physician at Jamaica Hospital by calling 718-206-6742.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Pancreatitis

The pancreas is a large gland located in the upper abdomen, behind our stomachs.  Our pancreas produces enzymes that aid with digestion as well as the release of hormones that regulate blood sugar. If these enzymes are activated while they are still in the pancreas (before they are released into the small intestine) they can lead to inflammation. This inflammation is known as pancreatitis.

Pancreatitis can be acute (lasting for a short time) or chronic (long-lasting). Acute pancreatitis is a sudden inflammation that can result in symptoms such as:

  • Fever
  • Rapid pulse
  • Vomiting
  • Upper abdominal pain that radiates into the back
  • Tenderness when touching the abdomen
  • Abdominal pain that worsens after eating

Chronic pancreatitis is inflammation that does not improve or heal over time. It can lead to permanent damage and impair an individual’s ability to digest food and make pancreatic hormones.   This damage can lead to symptoms that include:

  • Weight loss
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Oily or fatty stools
  • Pale or clay-colored stools
  • Jaundice (yellowing of the skin and eyes)

There are several factors and conditions believed to increase the risk of pancreatitis.  Risk factors include:

  • Family history of pancreatitis
  • Excessive alcohol consumption
  • Gallstones
  • Cystic fibrosis
  • Lupus
  • Smoking
  • Injury to the abdomen

Serious complications such as pancreatic cancer, diabetes or kidney failure can develop as a result of pancreatitis. Therefore, if you are experiencing symptoms associated with the disease it is recommended that you see your doctor right away.  Your doctor can order a series of tests and procedures to check for abnormalities of the pancreas. Treatment of pancreatitis varies with each individual and can include pancreatic enzyme supplements, treatment for alcohol dependence, smoking cessation, dietary changes, pain management or surgery.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

The Importance of Being Honest With Your Doctor

One of the most important factors in the physician / patient relationship is honesty. Doctors expect their patients to be truthful so they can provide appropriate care, but a 2018 study has revealed that as many as 80% of all patients lie or withhold information from their providers.

The study, which was published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), identified many reasons for patients not fully disclosing information to their doctors. The most cited reason was that they did not want to be judged or lectured about their behaviors. This was followed by the lack of desire to hear how bad the behavior was for their health, as well as simply being embarrassed about their health choices.  Other responses included not wanting information in their medical record, not wanting to take up their doctor’s time, and wanting their healthcare provider to like them.

The failure to provide accurate information however is not always the patient’s fault as some reasons relate to poor physician communication. Several patients revealed that they do not always fully understand their doctor’s questions.  Another reason why some patients admitted to not being truthful was to avoid disagreeing with their provider about their recommended treatment plan.

The topics that patients most commonly fail to be 100% honest with their doctor about include their diet, lack of exercise, sexual activity, medication management, and adherence to their treatment plan. The study revealed that some of the patients who were most dishonest to their provider were those in poor health.

This can be a potentially serious problem as patients withholding information from their doctors can prevent them from receiving the right care and can be dangerous to their overall health. According to researchers from this study, “Patients who aren’t forthright with their health information face unpleasant and sometimes life-threatening side effects from regimens their doctors give them.”

While much of the responsibility to be more forthcoming lies with the patient, those in the healthcare industry acknowledge that they can also help the situation. Knowing that there is a high-likelihood that patients might avoid disclosing important information, physicians need to make every attempt to be less judgmental and make every attempt to put their patients at ease.

By building a trusting and honest relationship, doctors and patients can work together so that the best care is provided.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

A Can Stroke Affect Young People Too

Stroke is usually thought of as something that happens to older people but an estimated 10% of stroke victims are under 45.

One study revealed that when a stroke occurs in younger individuals, the mortality rate is seven times higher than the general population. If a younger person has more than one stroke, their mortality rate increases to 17 times higher than the general population.

Risk factors include:

  • Obesity
  • Diabetes
  • Elevated cholesterol
  • Intravenous drug addiction
  • High blood pressure

Unfortunately, because strokes are less common in younger people, diagnosis and treatment is delayed. Diagnosing a stroke is usually done with the aid of an MRI. Younger people who are diagnosed quickly tend to do well when treated early with medication that can break up a blood clot. It is important that this medication be administered within the first 4 ½ hours.

To identify a stroke it is important to remember the FAST acronym which stands for the signs and symptoms of a stroke

Facial drooping

Ability to raise arms is limited or absent

Slurred speech

Time – how much time it takes to summon help

There are a few factors that can help prevent a stroke. These include maintaining a proper weight, smoking cessation, getting regular exercise, having a diet low in saturated fats and high in fruits and vegetables, and avoiding alcoholic beverages.

If you would like to schedule an appointment with a physician at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center to discuss your medical concerns, please call 718-206-6742.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

TENDONITIS

Tendonitis is an inflammation or irritation of the thick cord (tendon) that attaches you bone to muscle.

This condition occurs when an area is repeatedly injured by impact. There are various activities that can cause tendonitis.  Some of the more common causes include:

  • Gardening
  • Manual Labor
  • Golfing and Tennis
  • Skiing
  • Throwing

Often times, the injury is due to a lack of conditioning, such as stretching, before exercise or playing sports.

Some other reasons for Tendonitis may be medical.  It can be brought on by the strain of rheumatoid arthritis, gout, psoriatic arthritis and thyroid disorders.

Tendonitis usually occurs anywhere in the body where a tendon connects to a muscle such as the shoulder, hip, knee, elbow, Achilles tendon or at the base of the thumb.

The good news is, you can prevent tendonitis from happening.  If you are starting an exercise regimen, you should gradually build up to a comfortable level.  This will help your body strength grow with your exercise level.

If you are experiencing pain in your tendons or joints and would like to make an appointment to see a doctor at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-7001 for an appointment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Food Allergy Action Month

Allergenic food isolated on white

May has been designated as Food Allergy Action Month in an effort to educate Americans about food allergies and to support those who suffer from them.

Recent surveys indicate that 15 million Americans now suffer from food allergies. This number indicates that food allergies are much more common than previously believed and the number of people with allergies is steadily growing. It is now estimated that one out of every 13 children has a food allergy.

An allergic reaction occurs when the body’s immune system mistakenly identifies a food component as a hazardous substance and attacks it. The effects of food allergies may appear on the skin, in the respiratory passage, or in the gastrointestinal tract. The symptoms of food allergies may vary from mild to severe, and in extreme cases, they can even be fatal.

Minor reactions include:

  • Skin rash
  • Eczema
  • Diarrhea
  • Stomach cramps
  • Nausea

Serious Reactions Include:

  • Obstructive inflammation of the tongue and respiratory tract
  • Panting and wheezing
  • Lack of oxygen, leading to blue lips
  • Unconsciousness
  • Drop in pulse rate

Anaphylaxis is a very serious allergic reaction that can cause death. This type of allergic reaction requires immediate action and medical attention. If you or a loved one has a severe food allergy, you must be prepared for an emergency. Learn the signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis and know what the emergency care plan is. It may include the administration of epinephrine, a life-saving drug.

Over 170 different foods have been reported to cause an allergic reaction, but the food products that cause the most reactions are:

  • Soy
  • Milk
  • Fish / Shellfish
  • Peanuts / Tree Nuts
  • Eggs
  • Wheat

There is currently no cure for food allergies. To prevent an allergic reaction, it is important for the person with the allergy to stay away from foods that cause symptoms. Contact with even the smallest amounts of the allergen can cause serious problems. To avoid an allergic reaction, take the following precautions:

  • Learn to carefully read food labels and ask about ingredients in prepared foods
  • Wash your hands with soap and warm water before and after touching food
  • Use clean, uncontaminated utensils when preparing foods
  • Educate others about food allergies.

Every year in the United States, approximately 30,000 individuals are brought to hospital Emergency Departments and 150 people die due to severe allergic reactions. Jamaica Hospital joins the effort to raise awareness about food allergies and urges everyone to learn more about this growing, yet manageable issue.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.