Employee Spotlight Shines on Mukid Khan

This month, we are proud to shine our Employee Spotlight on Mukid Khan, Epic Systems Analyst  and Registered Respiratory Therapist . Today is a little more special for this recognition because it is also Mukid’s birthday.

Mukid has been with Jamaica Hospital Medical Center for 10 years. He began his career with us as a Registered Respiratory Therapist;  he still continues to fill this role on a per diem basis. His full time position now is as an Epic Systems Analyst.

Mukid grew up in Queens. He lived in Astoria until the age of 16 then moved to Jamaica. He now resides in Forest Hills. He attended P.S. 85 in Astoria, Middle College High School in Long Island City and went on to get his B.S. in Respiratory Care at SUNY Stony Brook. A few years later, Mukid went on to graduate school at SUNY Downstate Health Sciences University where he obtained his M.S. in Medical Informatics.

In his free time, he enjoys listening to thought-provoking podcasts, watching indie films with ambiguous endings, experiencing art shows, and live musical events. Mukid likes to travel to new places. The most memorable places he has visited are the temples and shrines of Kyoto, Japan and the Corn Islands of Nicaragua. He enjoys eating various types of food, his favorites being Nicaraguense, Bangladeshi, and Japanese.  Mukid likes music that is melodic especially house and rock. His hobbies include photography, hiking, gaming, experimenting with new recipes, and also mixing music. His favorite annual holiday-time movie is the Lord of Rings Trilogy.

The priorities in his life are his wife and best friend Cristina, family, friends and his cat Kuma.  Also important to him are the pursuit of knowledge, understanding and justice.

We look forward to Mukid continuing to work with us for many more years.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

3 Common Achilles Tendon Conditions (And How to Avoid Them)

The Achilles tendon, which stabilizes your foot and ankle by connecting your calf muscle and heel, can become injured in a variety of ways. These injuries can cause pain, discomfort, and weakness in your ankle, interfering significantly with your daily activities. However, by taking certain precautions to preserve the well-being of your Achilles tendon, you may be able to prevent or reduce your risk of injury.

Tendinitis causes swelling and inflammation in your tendons, resulting in pain and instability while walking. Tendinitis often occurs as a result of overuse of your tendons; in many cases, sports are the primary culprits.

Maintaining your flexibility through stretching or other light warm-ups prior to vigorous physical activity can help prevent tendinitis, but it’s also important to avoid repetitive motions that can lead to overuse injuries as much as possible.

Tendinosis is sometimes confused for tendinitis, as both of these conditions can occur as a result of overuse injuries. Unlike tendinitis, however, tendinosis is not an inflammatory condition; it involves degeneration of the collagen in your tendons that worsens over time, wearing down the tendon and causing its fibers to become thick and hard.

Similarly to tendinitis, tendinosis is best avoided by incorporating warm-up stretches into your physical activities and avoiding overuse of your leg muscles.

An Achilles tendon rupture occurs much more suddenly than tendinitis or tendinosis as the stress placed on your tendon is abruptly increased. This can happen if you trip, fall, or increase the intensity of your physical activities to quickly, potentially resulting in severe pain and swelling near the heel as well as weakness while walking.

Warm-up stretches can be helpful for avoiding these injuries, but calf-strengthening exercises, varied workouts, slow increases in activity intensity, and appropriate footwear are all essential for protecting your Achilles tendon, as well.

If you experience pain, discomfort, or weakness in your heel or ankle, expert podiatric treatment is available at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Podiatry Department. To schedule an appointment, please call (718) 206-6712.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Jamaica Hospital Medical Center First Hospital in Queens to Utilize Ceribell Rapid Response Technology

Jamaica Hospital Medical Center is the first hospital in Queens to utilize the most advanced technology to detect and diagnose seizure activity for critically ill patients to ensure they receive the most appropriate treatment as quickly as possible.

Millions of Americans live with seizures, which are defined as sudden, uncontrolled electrical disturbances in the brain. Seizures may occur after a stroke, a head injury, an infection such as meningitis, or another illness. They can take on many different forms and affect different people in different ways, and in some cases, may not generate any physical symptoms. Seizures can cause changes in behavior, movements or feelings, and in levels of consciousness. If untreated, seizures can have a lasting negative effect on brain function.

Traditionally, to detect and treat seizures, doctors need to rely on electroencephalography (or EEG) monitoring, which is not always readily available. Now, Jamaica Hospital can provide immediate detection of seizures through the application of the Ceribell Rapid Response EEG program. The Rapid EEG is the first of its kind and provides a vital sign of harmful brain patterns that do not produce observable signs in the patient and can only be diagnosed using EEG.

The Ceribell Rapid Response device is comprised of a simple headband with integrated electrodes, a pocket-sized recorder with intuitive software and an online portal for remote viewing. The system can be set up by a healthcare provider in a matter of minutes. Clinicians and nurses with no prior background in EEG can triage a seizure quickly and with a high rate of accuracy, and the technology’s remote capabilities allow a specialist to review the EEG data, assess response to treatment and optimize care, all in real-time, from nearly anywhere.

“This technology is now being offered in our Emergency Department and in our Intensive Care Units,” said Dr. Aashish Patel, Director of Neurology at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center. “Our entire team has been trained to use the Ceribell device and everyone marvels at its ease of use and diagnostic accuracy. This advancement will greatly benefit our most critically ill patients and help us provide immediate and appropriate care.”

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

5 Essential Clothing Items for Preventing Frostbite

Winter in New York City can be very cold due to windy weather and temperatures that often reach below freezing. If you are not adequately prepared, you face a greater risk of suffering from frostbite, which occurs when the skin and deeper layers of tissue freeze.

Frostbite can introduce a variety of long-term complications such as long-term numbness in the affected area, changes in skin color, loss of nails, arthritis, and gangrene, which can lead to an amputation. It’s most likely to occur when a part of your body is insufficiently protected against cold weather, but factors such as alcohol usage, smoking, and a history of previous frostbite incidents can increase your risk.

One of the most important steps you can take to prevent frostbite is to stock your wardrobe with clothing that provides adequate protection against the cold. Make sure you have each of the following items:

An insulated, windproof hat that covers your ears: Your ears are at a greater risk of experiencing frostbite than other parts of your body, making it important to wear a hat that covers them and adequately protects them against cold temperatures and wind.

An adequately-insulated jacket: Some of the best jackets for protecting against cold weather are waterproof and feature down insulation with a fill power between 500 and 900, with the higher end of this range indicating superior quality. Other materials that offer good insulation include wool, silk, and fur. Types of jackets you may want to look for include puffer jackets and parkas.

Mittens: Your hands are typically better protected against the cold by mittens rather than gloves. As with your jacket, look for materials such as wool or silk to ensure your mittens can adequately retain heat.

Boots: Whether the weather conditions you walk in are snowy, rainy, or dry, winter boots can provide better protection against both cold wind and water than other types of footwear such as sneakers. As with other clothing items, look for boots that are waterproof, windproof, and insulated.

Moisture-wicking shirts and socks: Even in very cold weather, you can potentially work up a sweat, leaving you vulnerable to cold wind. Choose moisture-wicking shirts, socks, and other under-layers of clothing, as these will move the sweat you produce to their outer layers.

If you develop frostbite this winter, visit a doctor as soon as possible. You can schedule an appointment at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center by calling (718) 206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

The Difference Between A Heart Attack and Cardiac Arrest

Heart attack and cardiac arrest are terms that are often used interchangeably; however, the two are very different life-threatening emergencies.  A heart attack is best described as a circulation problem, while a cardiac arrest is described as an electrical problem.

A heart attack or myocardial infarction occurs when blood flow that brings oxygen to the heart is severely reduced or blocked.  This blockage can be caused by the buildup of cholesterol, fat deposits, or other substances in the coronary arteries. The decreased flow of blood and oxygen to the heart muscle can lead to severe damage or death. The most common symptoms of a heart attack are:

  • Chest pain
  • Shortness of breath
  • Pain or discomfort in the jaw, neck, back, arm, shoulder, or stomach
  • Nausea
  • Lightheadedness

Time is of the essence when treating a heart attack. Each minute that goes by can result in more damage to the heart.  Emergency treatment, which includes medications, surgery, or a combination of both, is needed to restore the flow of blood and oxygen to the heart.

Cardiac arrest occurs when there is an electrical malfunction of the heart that causes it to stop pumping blood to other parts of the body. This can result in the loss of consciousness or death if not treated quickly.   The signs of a cardiac arrest are immediate and can include:

  • Heart palpitations
  • Shortness of breath
  • Unusual fatigue
  • Collapsing suddenly
  • Not breathing or gasping for air

Treatment for cardiac arrest should be immediate. Cardiac arrest may be reversed if CPR is performed, and a defibrillator shocks the heart to restore a normal rhythm within a few minutes.  Emergency treatment is needed to treat complications that may have resulted from cardiac arrest.

Jamaica Hospital Medical Center is recognized as a Primary Heart Attack Center by The Joint Commission and the American Heart Association. This certification reflects the hospital’s commitment to providing a high standard of cardiac care to heart attack patients.

Jamaica Hospital’s Cardiology Department cardiology takes pride in providing patients with the very best in heart health care. Our experts provide a wide range of inpatient and outpatient cardiovascular services for those with known or suspected diseases of the heart and blood vessels. To schedule an appointment with our cardiologists, please call 718-206-7100.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

National Blood Donor Month

Approximately every two seconds, someone in the United States needs a transfusion of blood, platelets, or plasma. However, this critically-needed blood is often in short supply, as only about 3% of eligible people donate blood each year.

A steady supply of donated blood is necessary for transfusions during a wide range of surgical procedures to counteract any blood loss that may occur. Approximately 21 million blood components are transfused throughout the U.S. each year.

Blood donations are also crucial for treating severe injuries. Victims of car accidents who have incurred severe injuries and blood loss can sometimes require as many as 100 units of blood; a healthy human body, in comparison, typically only holds about 10 units of blood at any given time. Additionally, transfusions are an essential part of treatment for chronic conditions that cause anemia, such as cancer or kidney disease.

There are four common types of donations: whole blood donations, red blood cell donations, plasma donations, and platelet donations.

Whole blood donations: This type of donation contributes approximately one pint of blood and includes all contents of the blood, including red blood cells, platelets, and plasma.

Red blood cell donations: People who meet certain height and weight requirements may be able to donate only their red blood cells; your platelets and plasma are returned to your bloodstream.

Plasma donations: A plasma donation only contributes your plasma, which is most often needed to treat accident and burn victims. Plasma transports protein and nutrients throughout the body.

Platelet donations: Platelets enable blood clotting, which prevents blood loss after sustaining an injury. This type of donation is needed for various types of patients, including accident victims, cancer patients, and people with blood clotting problems.

To make a donation, you can schedule an appointment at a blood drive or donor center near your area through the New York Blood Center.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

National Glaucoma Awareness Month

Glaucoma is an eye condition that causes damage to your optic nerve, which transmits signals from your eye to your brain and allows you to see. This causes blind spots in your vision to develop over time.

Glaucoma often occurs due to increased pressure in the eye, which is itself typically caused by a buildup of fluid in the eye. However, it can still develop in an eye with normal pressure.

Glaucoma is also one of the most common causes of blindness for people over the age of 60, but it can occur at any age. Other risk factors for this disease include:

  • A family history of glaucoma
  • Eye injuries
  • Chronic medical conditions such as diabetes, high blood pressure, or sickle cell anemia
  • Extended use of corticosteroids
  • Extreme nearsightedness or farsightedness

Glaucoma encompasses several different conditions that present varying symptoms, making it potentially challenging to identify. Additionally, many forms of glaucoma, such as open-angle and normal-tension glaucoma, may not present any symptoms in their early stages. Forms of glaucoma include:

  • Open-angle glaucoma
  • Acute angle-closure glaucoma
  • Normal-tension glaucoma
  • Pigmentary glaucoma
  • Pediatric glaucoma

There is no cure for glaucoma. However, there are steps you can take to reduce your risk of developing it. The first is to regularly visit an ophthalmologist for eye exams, including a comprehensive dilated eye exam by the age of 40. The second is to maintain an overall healthy lifestyle by maintaining a healthy weight, blood pressure, and physical activity level.

You can schedule an appointment with an ophthalmologist for glaucoma diagnosis or treatment at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Ophthalmology Department by calling (718) 206-5900.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Tips for Keeping Your New Year’s Resolution

Many people feel that the beginning of the New Year is the perfect time to get a “fresh start” on goals they would like to accomplish. While we may start off with good intentions, many people don’t follow through on their resolutions for more than a week or two. It may take time for a new habit or goal to become part of a daily routine, and those wanting immediate results may lose patience.

Here are some helpful suggestions for keeping your New Year’s resolutions this year:

  • Set goals that are realistic
  • Plan your goals in advance
  • Write down a plan on how you will achieve your goals
  • Tell others who you can trust to help you with your plan
  • Give yourself a reward when you reach certain levels of these goals
  • Keep track of your progress by writing it down
  • Don’t give up if the first attempt fails, try again.

Be patient with yourself. Changing a habit or starting a new routine can take time to get used to. If you don’t succeed with the first attempt, think about what went wrong and try to modify that behavior. You can always try again.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Make Your Smile a Priority in 2023

We have all made New Year’s resolutions at some point in our lives. Many of these annual vows revolve around improving our health.  Typical resolutions may include losing weight, quitting smoking, or beginning an exercise routine, but what about our oral health? The New Year is also a good time to commit ourselves to better dental care.

Make 2023 the year you look to improve your smile. Some ways to help you meet this goal include:

  • Practice Good Oral Hygiene– Daily brushing and flossing is a simple way to improve oral health. For successful bacterial plaque removal, it is important to brush at least twice a day and floss at least once per day to remove bacterial plaque and food that has accumulated throughout the day. Daily brushing and flossing help to prevent gingivitis (gum disease), tooth decay and halitosis (bad breath). The daily use of antimicrobial and fluoride mouth rinses also helps to improve your oral health.
  • Watch What You Eat and Drink– An essential part of achieving your dental health resolutions is making healthier food and beverage choices, especially for snacks. Frequent consumption of food and beverages containing carbohydrates and acids contributes to tooth decay.
  • Quit Smoking– Quitting cigarette smoking and smokeless tobacco use is important for improving your oral and overall health. There is no better time than the present to make a resolution to stop tobacco use. Consider free online tools, smoking cessation groups, progress-tracking apps and support from friends and family to assist you with tobacco cessation.
  • Use Whitening Products– There are several over-the-counter smile-improving products that you can use to whiten your teeth when you brush and floss. In recent years, tooth whitening has acquired enormous popularity because it can enhance the appearance of teeth by removing deep (intrinsic) or surface (extrinsic) stains.
  • Receive Regular Check-Ups– A resolution to make routine visits to the dentist may help prevent oral disease or reveal an existing disease in its early stage. Dental visits should take place every six months to allow your dentist and dental hygienists to monitor the condition of your oral cavity and develop an appropriate treatment plan to meet your wants and needs.

Some however might need to make more than a few lifestyle changes to address their dental needs. For those, a dentist or orthodontist can help. Make this the year you stop putting off having dental work done. An orthodontist can correct an overbite or straighten crooked teeth and a dentist can address your need for crowns, implants, or fillings to preserve your tooth structure.

To make an appointment at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Dental Center, please call 718-206-6980

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Mental Health Tips for the New Year

The beginning of a new year can bring many major changes with it. You may have a wide range of ideas about what you want or expect those changes to be and are figuring out how to prepare accordingly. However, it’s also easy to become overwhelmed by these expectations in a way that negatively impacts your mental health. Keep these tips in mind to stay focused on what matters and maintain a positive outlook as 2023 begins:

Make plans, not resolutions: New Year’s resolutions have an infamous tendency of falling through once the new year actually begins. This often happens because resolutions indicate a wish more than a serious goal. If you truly intend to pursue a major goal next year, write out a detailed plan for achieving it, including the steps required, your expected timeframe, and any resources you may need.

Avoid dwelling on future possibilities: You may start to consider different events that may occur next year, both good ones such as being offered a new, higher-paying job, and bad ones such as the death of a loved one. Even if these events were to occur, they are only future possibilities and are outside of your control. If necessary, account for these possibilities only as part of a plan for a relevant goal; dwelling on them will only damage your mental health.

Enjoy the present moment: Other than making plans for things you would like to change, you should keep your attention on the present. The friends, loved ones, and circumstances around you may be different in the future, but you can choose to make the most of the time you have with the ones that are in your life right now and give yourself (and them) fond memories to look back on in the future.

Are you suffering from symptoms of anxiety or depression related to concerns about the new year? You can talk to a mental health professional at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Mental Health Clinic. To schedule an appointment, please call (718) 206-5575.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.