Jamaica Hospital Receives Geriatric Emergency Department Accreditation

The average American is living longer now than ever before, and while this is very good news, it does require the healthcare industry to adapt to caring for a growing senior population.

Senior citizens utilize the hospital system at higher rates than non-seniors and they often require treatment for multiple chronic conditions. While seniors make contact with the healthcare system at many different points of care, the place where they most often receive their care is in the Emergency Department.

Understanding the special needs of its geriatric patients, Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Emergency Department has made many special accommodations to treat them. In recognition of their efforts, the hospital recently received a Geriatric Emergency Department Accreditation by the American College of Emergency Physicians. Jamaica Hospital is the only hospital in Queens to receive this accreditation.

“By receiving this designation, Jamaica Hospital has demonstrated a commitment to addressing the specific healthcare needs of our older patients,” stated Dr. Shi-Wen Lee, Vice Chairman of Emergency Medicine at Jamaica Hospital.

To achieve this accreditation, Jamaica Hospital had to meet many criteria, including ensuring that physician and nursing staff receive focused education in geriatric emergency medicine. This training is aimed to help providers better understand and address the complex social and physical challenges of the geriatric patient.

In addition to receiving focused education, the hospital also needed to implement geriatric emergency care policies and guidelines, ensure geriatric patients received access to specific equipment and supplies, and even make accommodations to the emergency department’s physical environment.

According to Dr. Nathan Washburn, ER attending integrally involved in the accreditation process, “The process to achieve this designation was not an easy one; it required hard work and dedication by many, but ultimately we feel that it displays a commitment to elevating the level of care we provide to our geriatric patients.”

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Splinter Hemorrhages

Splinter hemorrhage  doctor Queens New York The appearance of your nails can reveal clues about your health.  Abnormalities in the shape, color or texture of nails or nail beds are sometimes indicative of underlying medical conditions.

One of the abnormalities that can occur is the appearance of small, dark-red or brown blood vessels that resemble splinters under your nails. These visible blood vessels are known as splinter hemorrhages.

Splinter hemorrhages can develop as a result of trauma or injury to the nail.  However, in instances where trauma is not involved, the appearance of blood vessels under the nail could signal the development of serious health issues.

Some medical conditions that can cause splinter hemorrhages to appear include:

  • Endocarditis- An infection of the heart valves and chambers
  • Vasculitis – Damage or swelling of the blood vessels
  • Scleroderma- An  autoimmune disease that causes hardening and tightening of the skin and connective tissues
  • Peptic ulcer disease- A condition in which painful sores or ulcers develop  in the lining of the stomach or parts of  the small intestine
  • Psoriasis – An inflammatory disease characterized by a buildup of excess skin cells that result in scales and red patches on the skin
  • Raynaud’s disease- A rare disorder of the blood vessels that causes them to constrict excessively in response to cold

Splinter hemorrhages can also appear as a result of taking certain medications such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

If splinter hemorrhages form after receiving trauma or injury to the nails, there is usually no need to see a doctor- unless the hemorrhages do not go away on their own.  (Splinter hemorrhages typically take 3-4 months to disappear).   You should see a doctor immediately if splinter hemorrhages appear without trauma or injury.  Your doctor will order a series of tests to isolate a possible cause.

To schedule an appointment with a doctor at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please  718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Signs and Symptoms Of A Blood Clot

Signs and Symptoms of a blood clot-vascular doctor in Queens

According to the American Society of Hematology, “Blood clotting is an important process that prevents, excessive bleeding when a blood vessel is injured.” Typically,  once injuries have healed,  our bodies naturally dissolve clots- allowing blood vessels to function normally when transporting blood.

However, there are instances in which blood clots do not form as a result of injury and do not dissolve on their own.  Blood clots may also form as a result of complications caused by obesity, pregnancy, prolonged sitting, smoking, certain medications or diseases.  When clots do not dissolve they can lead to serious health issues such as stroke or heart attack.

Knowing the signs and symptoms of a blood clot can help you to recognize a potential threat to your health and seek treatment in a timely manner. Signs and symptoms include:

  • Swelling
  • Change in color in arms or legs
  • Pain in chest, arms or legs
  • Lower leg cramps
  • A warm spot on the leg
  • Trouble breathing
  • Coughing up blood
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • High blood pressure
  • Blood in urine
  • Fever
  • Light-headedness
  • Headache
  • Speech or vision difficulties

If you are experiencing these symptoms, seek medical attention right away.  This may save your life or reduce the severity of certain complications. Treatment is determined by the location of the blood clot and may include surgery or medication (anticoagulants or thrombolytics).

To schedule a visit with a doctor at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-7001

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Bruises – Why We Get Them

A bruise is a common injury that causes the skin to become discolored. When there is bleeding beneath the surface of the skin it becomes evident as a black and blue mark. Eventually, if the person is healthy, the skin will reabsorb the blood and the black and blue mark will fade. A bruise may hurt at first but the pain subsides usually before the discoloration goes away.

 

 

Bruising occurs more frequently in:

  • Older people because their skin isn’t as thick as it once was.
  • Women because they typically have thinner skin.
  • People who exercise vigorously.
  • People who take anti-coagulating medications such as aspirin.
  • People who use topical or oral cortical steroids bruise more easily because it can make the skin thinner
  • People who use the dietary supplement ginkgo can also cause the skin to bruise more easily because it acts as a blood thinner

People who bruise easily should be checked to see if they have serious medical conditions. This would include having blood clotting issues due to taking certain medications or not having the correct amount of blood clotting proteins in the body. Bruising can also be a sign of physical abuse and this must be followed up with a physician or with the police if it is noticed and there is no explanation as to why it occurred.

Treating a bruise includes using a cold compress, elevating an extremity if it is on an arm or leg, taking acetaminophen for discomfort, and after the initial 48 hours, using a warm compress to help the flow of blood in the area.

While most bruises will resolve on their own, it is important to get medical attention if the bruise has a lot of swelling and pain or if it doesn’t start to resolve in two weeks and is still present after a month. Any bruising of the head or the eye should be followed up with a physician.

You can schedule an appointment with a physician at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center by calling 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Facts About Lyme Disease

ticks, lymedisease, hiking, outdoors

With summer in full swing, we will be spending more time participating in activities outdoors in areas such as parks, forests and hiking trails.  While getting out and keeping physically fit is strongly encouraged it is important to keep in mind that being in these areas can put you at risk for Lyme disease.

Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center offers the following information on Lyme disease, how it is spread, its symptoms, and treatment.

Lyme disease is the most common tick-born infection in New York City and in the United States.  On the east coast, Lyme disease is spread by the bite of a black-legged tick infected with the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi.  Not all black-legged ticks carry this bacterium and, even if they are infected, they must be attached for at least 36 – 48 hours after a person is bitten to transmit the disease.

Black-legged ticks are rarely found in NYC, but if you have been traveling in more rural areas of New York such as Westchester and Long Island you are at greater risk of coming into contact with an infected tick.

The annual number of cases of Lyme disease reported continues to rise each year in non-rural communities.

Some of the early warning signs of Lyme disease are:

  • Muscle aches
  • Headache
  • Fatigue
  • Fever
  • Rash

These signs and symptoms may occur anywhere from three to 30 days after being bitten.  After an infected tick bite, a widening red area may appear at the infected site that is clear in the center, forming a bullseye appearance.

The best way to avoid contracting Lyme disease is to avoid direct contact with ticks.  You can do this by avoiding wooded and brushy areas, and high grass.  If you are hiking, try to walk in the center of the trails and wear long pants and a long-sleeved shirt. If in a wooded area you should use a strong repellent (with Deet).  Dr. Klein cautions that when using any repellent, you should avoid applying the solution to your hands, eyes and mouth.

Some of the tips to find and remove ticks from your body and clothing are:

  • Perform a check of your entire body viewing under your arms, behind and in your ears, inside your navel, behind your knees, along your legs, waist and hair. Also, check your pet.
  • Take a shower soon after returning indoors. If you wash within two hours of returning indoors, the ticks are more easily found and washed off your body.
  • Once you are indoors, take your clothing and place them in the wash using hot water and then put them in the dryer on “high” for at least 10 minutes; if the clothes were washed in cold water, place them in the dryer on “high” for at least 90 minutes

If Lyme disease is left untreated, it can spread to other parts of the body causing arthritis cardiac and nervous system problems.   If you would like to make an appointment with one of the many qualified doctors specializing in Internal Medicine at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-7001 to schedule.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Is Your Kitchen Sponge Absorbing More Than Soap?

dirtysponge, bacteria, e.coli, salmonella, cleansponge

Did you know that your kitchen sponge can harbor more bacteria than your toilet bowl?  Well, it can.

As food particles in your sponge begin to decompose, the sponge may smell sour or like mildew. When there is an odor, it is a sign that a bacterium is more than likely present.

Since one single bacteria cell can become more than 8 million cells in less than 24 hours, it is safe to assume that your wet, dirty kitchen sponge may quickly become a breeding ground for E. coli, salmonella, and campylobacter bacteria, which can cause mild to serious illness.

Therefore, keeping your sponge clean is an important component to minimizing the growth of bacteria.

There are many ways to cleanse your sponge such as, placing the sponge in the microwave for one to two minutes, running it though the wash cycle in your dishwasher or soaking your sponge in white vinegar for five minutes.  Although all these methods profess to kill at least 99% of bacteria, the most effective way to kill bacteria in your sponge is with bleach.

Start by mixing ¾ cup of bleach in one gallon of water and soaking your sponge for five minutes before rinsing, studies have shown that this method of cleaning will kill 99.9% of the three bacteria strains from sponges.

Keep in mind that no matter how meticulous you are about keeping your sponges clean, you should change your sponge every two to three weeks.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

What is Popcorn Lung and Can Vaping Cause It?

“Popcorn lung” is the nickname for bronchiolitis obliterans, a serious and irreversible lung disease that can damage the smallest airways in your lungs, resulting in coughing and shortness of breath.

popcorn lung, pulmonary medicine, Jamaica Hospital, vaping, e-cigarettes, lungs

The condition got its nickname because of the chemical diacetyl, a buttery flavored chemical that was commonly found in microwave popcorn.  After workers at the factories that produced microwave popcorn began to experience symptoms associated with bronchiolitis obliterans after inhaling diacetyl, manufacturers removed it from their products.

While diacetyl is no longer a threat from microwaved popcorn, many are now being exposed to it through e-cigarette vapor. Diacetyl is often added to “e-juice” liquid by some e-cigarette companies to complement flavorings such as vanilla, maple, coconut and more. In fact, recent studies have found that more than 75 percent of flavored e-cigarettes and refill liquids tested positive for diacetyl

So how does diacetyl cause popcorn lung? Your lungs are where your blood receives oxygen before carrying it to cells in the rest of your body through tiny air sacs called alveoli. Exposure to diacetyl can irritate or scar the alveoli, causing inflammation or narrowing, making it difficult for them to deliver oxygen to your blood.

The main symptoms of popcorn lung are a dry cough and shortness of breath. These show up between two weeks and two months after you’ve been around a toxic gas or had an illness. You’re especially likely to have them after exercising or heavy labor.

Other symptoms may include:

  • Flu-like illness with fever
  • Unexplained fatigue
  • Weight loss
  • Wheezing
  • Eye, skin, mouth, or nose irritation, if caused by chemical exposure

Popcorn lung is often misdiagnosed as asthma, bronchitis, or emphysema. To diagnose popcorn lung, your doctor will order an X-ray, CT scan or a surgical lung biopsy. Your doctor may also want to measure your lung’s function by conducting a pulmonary function test.

Unfortunately, there is no cure for popcorn lung, but there are treatments to help alleviate the symptoms or slow the progression of the disease. Treatment options include prescription corticosteroids, cough suppressants, bronchodilators to open the airways or immunosuppressant therapy to decrease your body’s immune response. In severe cases oxygen supplementation may be needed. If left untreated, popcorn lung can be fatal in some cases.

The best way to prevent developing popcorn lung is to avoid exposure to harmful chemicals like diacetyl, found in e-cigarettes.

If you are experiencing symptoms of popcorn lung, make an appointment to see your doctor. To make an appointment with a Pulmonologist at Jamaica Hospital, please call our Ambulatory Care Department at 718-206-7001.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Sunscreen and Skin Cancer Prevention

Sunscreen protection- properly using sunscreen Many of us enjoy soaking up the sun in the summer, however, it is important that we do so safely and with discretion to prevent skin cancer.

One of the best ways to protect our skin from the sun’s harmful rays is to wear sunscreen.  Studies show that using sunscreen regularly reduces the incidence of melanoma (a form of skin cancer) by 50-73%.

Sunscreen works by preventing the sun’s ultraviolet (UV) radiation from reaching the skin.   Your sunscreen’s ability to prevent radiation from damaging your skin is measured by its SPF (Sun Protecting Factor). It is highly advised that you use sunscreens with an SPF of 15 or higher, as this offers better protection.

The Skin Cancer Foundation also recommends using a broad-spectrum sunscreen which offers protection against UVA and UVB radiation. Too much exposure from either type of radiation has been linked to skin cancer.

Additional recommendations for proper sunscreen use include:

  • Applying sunscreen approximately 30 minutes before sun exposure to ensure the product has enough time to properly bind to the skin
  • Applying sunscreen generously and regularly
  • Checking product instructions for how often  sunscreen should be applied
  • Reapplying sunscreen after swimming or excessive sweating

It is important to keep in mind that protecting your skin from the sun does not only include wearing sunscreen. Remember to wear protective clothing or accessories such as broad-brimmed hats and long-sleeved shirts and limit the amount of time spent in the sun.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Jamaica Hospital’s Patient Navigation Department

The goal of the Patient Navigation department is to act as a liaison between the MediSys Health Care System and the patient. Navigators work with providers to assist patients with chronic conditions and identify barriers to care while helping patients overcome them. As Qualified Medical Interpreters, Navigators help to eliminate the language barrier and act as cultural brokers between patients and providers. Patient Navigators receive extensive training to be able to provide health education for patients with diabetes, hypertension, asthma, lactation concerns and looking to cease smoking.

The Navigators have spearheaded many community outreach efforts throughout our MediSys clinics like highlighting Asthma Care and treatment to our patients with a series of Asthma Day events. As well as making a presence at the Farmers Market during the 2018 and 2019 seasons and at Jamaica Hospital’s End of Year Health Fair & Employee Wellness Day, these served to inform the community about smoking cessation resources, including hospital and state initiatives to help persons quit smoking and meet their health goals.

In an effort to improve our patients’ health outcomes, the Patient Navigation department is tasked with contacting our patients to assist them in scheduling and completing essential services, among other things preventative screenings (Colon, Breast & Cervical Cancer screenings, HIV tests), specialty visits (Podiatry, Ophthalmology, Gynecology), assessments (Care of Older Adults, Asthma Action Plans) lab test and wellness check-ups.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Meet Dr. Sophia Jagroop

Colonoscopy in Queens New York Jamaica Hospital would like to introduce Dr. Sophia Jagroop to the community.

Dr. Jagroop has been with Jamaica Hospital for two years and is the Director of Endoscopy.

In addition to performing many of the standard gastrointestinal procedures, such as endoscopies and colonoscopies, Dr. Jagroop’s training allows her to perform advanced endoscopic procedures.

These procedures include Endoscopic Ultrasound (EUS), a minimally invasive procedure to assess the digestive tract and surrounding organs and Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), a procedure to examine the pancreatic and bile ducts.

Dr. Jagroop is very excited to be practicing medicine at Jamaica Hospital, as she is very familiar with the community. “I grew up in the community as my father is also a doctor and his office is in Richmond Hill. I understand and can relate to the healthcare needs of the community and I’m happy to be able to offer them these advanced services that patients would have otherwise need to travel out of Queens to receive.”

Dr. Jagroop treats patients at 134-20 Jamaica Avenue. To schedule an appointment, please call 718-206-8755.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.