Shining Our Spotlight on MediSys Clocktower

This month we are proud to shine our spotlight on the MediSys Family Care Center located at 91-20 Atlantic Avenue in Ozone Park.

This building has a long history in the community as it once was a part of the Lalance and Grosjean manufacturing complex. It has been known for over a century as “The Clocktower” owing to its distinctive clock which is situated at the highest point of the building. Originally this factory manufactured stamped iron and tin housewares and employed as many as 2100 people, many of whom lived in the community.  Prior to its closing in 1955, the factory produced stainless steel for the U.S. Navy during World War II. The factory closed in 1955 and it became a bank for many years. In 1996 this building opened as MediSys Clocktower.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is DSC_0368-1024x680.jpgMediSys Clocktower is located in a three story building featuring 22 modern exam and treatment rooms. It is staffed by 50 people and annually they see over 30,00 patient visits. The services offered at the center include: pediatrics, family medicine, integrative medicine, OB/GYN, dental, radiology, pediatric endocrinology, pediatric gastroenterology, pulmonary medicine, allergy, breast surgery, and podiatry.  The hours of operation are Monday – Thursday 7:00 AM – 7:00 PM, Friday 7:00 AM – 5:00 PM and Saturday 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM.  The Q 24 bus stops right in front of the building.

A few staff members shared with us their thoughts on why they enjoy working at this site. Stephanie Flaherty a nurse practitioner has been working at this site for over 20 years. She states that “ working at the Clocktower gives her a great sense of pride because she feels she is making a difference in her patients’ lives. The staff all work together as a team to make the patients have a pleasant experience”. Martha Leonardo is an ambulatory care representative who tells us that “there is a great deal of satisfaction making sure that the patients are treated well and there is a sense of family amongst the staff that work here”.  Geovanny Sang is a dental hygienist who has worked for the MediSys HealthThis image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is DSC_0376-1024x680.jpg Network for over 23 years, and at the Clocktower for over two years. She tells us that one of the most important roles she has is “educating the patients about proper dental care. Many patients come from very diverse places in the world and she enjoys spending time with them. The staff works well together as a team”.  Dr. Naira Isakharov is a pediatrician who has worked at the Clocktower for almost five years. She tells us that “the continuity of patient care is very important and educating patients and their families on proper health habits is a major component of how she cares for them”.

If you would like to schedule an appointment with one of the providers at this office, please call 718-641-8207.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Understanding Popular Skincare Products

Hyaluronic acid, retinol, alpha-hydroxy acids (AHAs) are all common ingredients found in many popular skincare products.  Before purchasing any goods that include these ingredients, it’s important for consumers to understand what they are a buying and applying to their skin.

Here is a guide to some of the most common skincare ingredients to help you choose what’s best for you:

  • Hyaluronic Acid- is found naturally in our bodies, most commonly in the eyes, skin and in joint fluid. This substance helps with retaining water needed to keep joints and tissues well lubricated.   As we age, the production of hyaluronic acid decreases, resulting in our skin losing hydration, volume, and firmness.  Hyaluronic acid is added to skin care products to increase hydration, help skin feel more supple, and improve its texture.
  • Retinol- is a derivative of vitamin A. Products containing up to 2% retinol can be purchased over the counter, anything above this number may require a prescription.  Using retinol provides several benefits such as promoting cell turnover, reducing inflammation, treating acne, preventing the breakdown of collagen, and improving the appearance of skin texture and tone.
  • Alpha-hydroxy acids (AHAs)- are natural acids found in foods. There are several types of AHAs used in skincare products, these include glycolic acid (from sugar cane), tartaric acid (from grapes), citric acid (from citrus fruits), hydroxycaprylic acid (from animals), and lactic acid (from lactose or tomato juice). AHAs can help promote skin firmness, remove dead skin cells, improve the appearance of wrinkles and treat dry skin.

Reading the label on skincare products is very important. Pay attention to the ingredients and know their positive or negative effects. If you are unsure about how these ingredients may affect your skin, you should consult a dermatologist.

To schedule an appointment with a dermatologist at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call (718) 206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Melatonin Sleep Aids: Risks and Benefits

The use of melatonin sleep aids has grown in popularity.  Although taking these supplements for short-term use and in accordance with a doctor’s guidance is generally safe- misusing them can lead to harmful health effects.

Melatonin is a hormone that is naturally produced by our bodies to help regulate our sleep-wake cycles.  However, some people may choose to take lab-made melatonin as supplements because their bodies do not produce enough of the hormone, or they are having difficulty falling asleep or staying awake.

When taken safely, melatonin can offer multiple health benefits.  Research suggests that melatonin supplements may help provide relief from several sleep problems such as insomnia, jet lag or shift work sleep disorder.

Melatonin supplements are not regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA); therefore, there is not much information available on safe or best dosages.  This is why it is highly advised to consult a physician before using melatonin due to the risk of developing potential side effects such as:

  • Dizziness
  • Headaches
  • Nausea
  • Drowsiness or sleepiness
  • Mild tremors
  • Disorientation or confusion
  • Low blood pressure

Certain medications are known to interact with melatonin and pose health complications.  Interactions can occur with the following types of drugs:

  • Blood pressure medications
  • Immunosuppressants
  • Contraceptive drugs
  • Epilepsy medications
  • Diabetes medications

Before taking melatonin as a sleep aid, please speak with your doctor. If you are experiencing problems sleeping such as insomnia or other disorders, a sleep specialist can help you to explore the best treatments for your health.  To schedule an appointment with a sleep specialist at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, call 718-206-5916.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

February is National Cancer Prevention Month

February is National Cancer Prevention Month. During this time, Jamaica Hospital Medical Center encourages everyone to adopt healthy lifestyle practices to reduce the likelihood of developing cancer.

Here are a few steps you can take to reduce your risk of developing cancer:

  • Don’t use tobacco – Toxins found in tobacco products have been known to cause lung, colorectal, breast, throat cervical, bladder, mouth, and esophageal cancer. If you are a smoker or use tobacco products the best thing to do for your health is to quit.
  • Eat a healthy diet – Preparing meals focused based on vegetables, fruits, whole grains, and beans will help fortify your body against cancer. Limiting red meat and avoiding processed food are also great defenses.
  • Protect your skin from the sun – Skin cancer is very common and one of the most preventable types of cancer. Wear adequate sun protection when exposed to the sun’s ultraviolet rays.
  • Obesity is linked to breast and colorectal cancer. You can avoid excessive weight gain by maintaining a healthy diet and exercising regularly. Thirty minutes a day of regular exercise have been shown to help your general health. There is a link to obesity and breast and colorectal cancer.
  • Know your family history – Many cancers are known to run in families. Let your physician know if anyone in your family has or had cancer.
  • Get regular cancer screenings – Early detection can be helpful in some cases because it can lead to early diagnosis and treatment.

Discuss with your physician your medical history and your risk for cancer. If you would like to schedule an appointment with a physician at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-7001

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Burn Awareness Week: Fire Prevention Safety Tips

The first full week of February is designated as Burn Awareness Week. Jamaica Hospital Medical Center is taking this opportunity to educate the community about ways to prevent burns in the home.

One of the best ways to prevent burns from occurring at home is to prevent fires. Being aware of the causes of residential fires and learning how to avoid these issues.

The biggest culprits for at-home fires are space heaters and cooking accidents. Space heaters are the number one cause of winter fire deaths. They are used commonly in apartments, homes and dorms. Therefore, it is important to know how to properly use these devices.  Here is a guide:

  • Make sure to thoroughly read the directions for every new space heater you buy, as some directions may vary. When purchasing a space heater, look for a certification from an approved source, such as Underwriters Laboratories, the leading independent safety testing organization.
  • Never plug a space heater into an extension cord. Space heaters should only ever be plugged directly into a wall outlet. This is because space heaters generate so much energy, that it can overload the power strip and cause a fire.
  • Make sure the space heater is placed somewhere safe in your home, meaning at least three feet away from other flammable objects, such as loose paper, curtains, furniture, boxes, etc. Space heaters should not be placed on top of carpets, as this can generate too much electricity and cause a burn or fire.
  • Never block an entrance or exit path with a space heater, in the unfortunate situation that a space heater does go on fire, this can prevent you from leaving the site.
  • Never leave a space heater on and unattended, this includes leaving a space heater on when you go to sleep. This is very dangerous and contributes to the majority of fires occurring when people are asleep. Leaving a space heater on and too close to your body can lead to an injurious burn on your body as well.

Cooking accidents are the number one cause of home fires year-round. In fact, 47% of home fires are due to cooking incidents. Here are a few cooking safety tips to help reduce the risk of injury:

  • Make sure you cook when you are wide awake and in the right state of mind to handle sharp items, fire, and gas.
  • Make sure to clean up your stove from grease build up to prevent fires from starting. In the event of a grease or oil fire, water will not eliminate the fire. In these situations, it is best to cover the pot with a lid or large tray and turn off the heat, as water will make the situation worse.

Although space heaters and cooking accidents are among the leading causes of home fires, it is also important to keep in mind the dangers of electrical fires- the third leading cause of fires.  Here are a few precautions you can follow to keep your home safe:

  • Do not use appliance or devices with frayed or cracked electrical cords
  • Do not plug any items that generate heat or cool air, such as a space heater, microwave, and refrigerator, into an extension cord or a multi-plug adaptor. By plugging too many electricity generating items, one runs the risk of overwhelming the outlet and creating a fire. Best practice is to plug these items directly into the wall outlet.

It is important to have a working smoke detector and carbon monoxide alarm in your home as 70% of fire deaths have occurred in homes that do not have working carbon monoxide alarms or smoke alarms.  Both devices serve as early warnings in the event there is a fire in your home. The batteries for these items should be changed twice a year. A great way to remember to change the batteries is to do so when daylight saving time begins and ends, change your clocks change your batteries.

If you are interested in having a free fire, burn, or home safety presentation for your group or organization, please contact the Trauma Department, Injury Prevention, at Jdennehy@jhmc.org.

Jessica Dennehy, Trauma Injury Prevention Coordinator

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

How Is Type 2 Diabetes Treated?

Type 2 diabetes is a disease that occurs when blood glucose or blood sugar levels are abnormally high. It is the most common type of diabetes affecting approximately 29 million people living in the United States.

Type 2 diabetes impairs cells in the body from properly using insulin-a hormone produced by the pancreas that aids in regulating blood glucose levels. This impairment can lead to other serious health problems such as vision loss, kidney, or heart disease.

Symptoms of Type 2 diabetes may take years to present. It is common for individuals to have the disease and not know that they have it.  Symptoms may include frequent urination, increased thirst, increased hunger, blurred vision, unexplained weight loss, fatigue, tingling or numbness in the hands and feet, as well as slow-healing wounds.

There is no cure for Type 2 diabetes; however, the disease can be managed successfully with medications. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), “…your doctor may prescribe insulin, other injectable medications, or oral diabetes medicines to help manage your blood sugar and avoid complications.”

Lifestyle habits such as eating a healthy diet, exercising, and consistently monitoring blood glucose levels are also beneficial in managing your diabetes.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

February is National Children’s Dental Health Month

February is recognized as National Children’s Dental Health Month. The purpose of this recognition is to promote proper dental education to children and their caregivers.

It is important to develop healthy dental habits early in a child’s life as this can help to prevent cavities and tooth decay.

Caring for children’s dental health should begin when they are infants. A baby’s teeth and gums can be cleaned by using a clean, soft cloth. For children aged two to six, it is recommended that an adult puts the toothpaste on the brush. Use only a pea-sized amount of fluoride toothpaste. Try brushing your child’s teeth first, then let him/her finish.  Until they are seven or eight years old, you will need to help your child brush. Teeth should be brushed twice a day for two minutes each time.

It is recommended that children see their dentist every six months for regular check-ups and cavity prevention. To make an appointment at the dental department at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-6980.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.