Why Does Warm Weather Increase the Frequency of Kidney Stones ?

Why do kidney stones occur more frequently during warmer weather? When the weather is warm, we are more likely to become dehydrated which increases the risk for our bodies to develop kidney stones.

We tend to sweat more in the hotter months which deplete our body of fluids; this in turn will make our urine more concentrated. Urine that is highly concentrated allows for the formation of stones made up of calcium, oxalate or uric acid. A stone can be as small as a grain of sand or as large as a pea.

When the body is dehydrated, there is also less of a flow of urine through the ureters (the tube between the kidney and the bladder) which is an important factor in moving the kidney stones through this passageway.

Kidney stones can cause a tremendous amount of pain when passing through the ureter. This pain can be felt in the lower back and groin.

Additional symptoms of kidney stones include:

  • Blood in the urine
  • Nausea
  • Fever and Chills
  • Vomiting
  • If you have had kidney stones, there is a 50 percent chance that you can develop more within the following five years. However, you can take a few precautions to lower your risk or prevent stones from developing. Ways to prevent kidney stones include:
  • Drinking at least eight to twelve glasses of water each day to dilute the urine
  • Limiting your salt intake
  • Cutting back on red meats, organ meats and shellfish
  • Drinking sugar free lemonade or limeade as the citrate will prevent stone formation
  • If you are experiencing any of the symptoms of a kidney stone, seek medical help right away. If you would like to schedule an appointment with a urologist at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center please call 718-206-7110.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Bruises – Why We Get Them

A bruise is a common injury that causes the skin to become discolored. When there is bleeding beneath the surface of the skin it becomes evident as a black and blue mark. Eventually, if the person is healthy, the skin will reabsorb the blood and the black and blue mark will fade. A bruise may hurt at first but the pain subsides usually before the discoloration goes away.

 

 

Bruising occurs more frequently in:

  • Older people because their skin isn’t as thick as it once was.
  • Women because they typically have thinner skin.
  • People who exercise vigorously.
  • People who take anti-coagulating medications such as aspirin.
  • People who use topical or oral cortical steroids bruise more easily because it can make the skin thinner
  • People who use the dietary supplement ginkgo can also cause the skin to bruise more easily because it acts as a blood thinner

People who bruise easily should be checked to see if they have serious medical conditions. This would include having blood clotting issues due to taking certain medications or not having the correct amount of blood clotting proteins in the body. Bruising can also be a sign of physical abuse and this must be followed up with a physician or with the police if it is noticed and there is no explanation as to why it occurred.

Treating a bruise includes using a cold compress, elevating an extremity if it is on an arm or leg, taking acetaminophen for discomfort, and after the initial 48 hours, using a warm compress to help the flow of blood in the area.

While most bruises will resolve on their own, it is important to get medical attention if the bruise has a lot of swelling and pain or if it doesn’t start to resolve in two weeks and is still present after a month. Any bruising of the head or the eye should be followed up with a physician.

You can schedule an appointment with a physician at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center by calling 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Employee Spotlight Shines on Lauren Banner, RN

This month we are proud to shine our Employee Spotlight on Lauren Banner, RN. Lauren started her career at Jamaica Hospital nine years ago as a registrar in the Emergency Department and upon completion of her nursing degree she joined the Nursing Department, where she is currently  assigned to the surgical and orthopedic unit on 3 North.

Lauren grew up in Franklin Square and graduated from Carey High School. She obtained her RN from Nassau Community College and then her BS in Nursing from the Chamberlin School of Nursing. She currently lives in Queens with her 15 month old daughter Ariella, her fiancé, and  her two year old Shitzu Yorkie mix named Harley.

Lauren has a special connection to Jamaica Hospital. Her mother Donna has worked at the hospital for many years and several of her mother’s colleagues have known her since she was a little girl. There is also another connection to nursing in her family. Her brother recently graduated from nursing school.

In her free time Lauren enjoys going out to eat, especially to Mexican and Italian restaurants, and she enjoys spending time with her family and friends. Lauren maintains a very close relationship with many of her high school friends and enjoys getting together with them as often as possible. She enjoys all kinds of music, especially oldies, hip-hop, and country.

Lauren really enjoys working at Jamaica Hospital and especially on her unit. She says that they all work together really well and that it feels like they area family. Lauren intends to stay at Jamaica Hospital for a long time and we hope she does.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Safety Tips for Driving at Night

The National Safety Council estimates that even though we do only a quarter of our driving at night, approximately 50% of all traffic accidents occur after dark. This leaves many wondering why so many accidents take place at night.

One of the main reasons is that at night, our depth perception is reduced, as is peripheral vision and the ability to see colors. We are also more likely to be more tired at night which can affect our reflexes. People who don’t get enough sleep or who have been working long hours are more prone to having an accident.

Another factor that can affect our ability to drive and see well at night is age. According to the National Safety Council, a person who is older than fifty years of age may need twice as much light to see well as a person who is only 30. Older drivers may also have compromised vision as a result of degenerative eye diseases or cataracts.

There are a few precautions drivers can take to prevent accidents while driving at night. Jamaica Hospital’s Trauma service and the National Safety Council recommends the following:

  • Keeping the windshield clean
  • Making sure headlights are aimed properly
  • Reducing  your speed
  • Turning your headlights on as soon as it starts to get dark so others can see you
  • Increasing  the distance between your car and the car ahead
  • Pulling over if you feel too tired to drive
  • Getting at least seven hours of sleep

Older drivers are encouraged to get annual eye exams to make sure that their eyes are healthy. These annual exams can also see if there are cataracts forming which can impair vision, and can check to see if eyeglass prescriptions are needed.

If you would like to schedule an appointment with an eye doctor at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-5900.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Shining the Employee Spotlight on Yanina Levanidova

This month Jamaica Hospital is proud to shine its employee spotlight on Yanina Levanidova, a nurse in the Emergency Department who has been with the hospital for ten years.

Yanina is originally from St. Petersburg Russia and came to New York in 1994. Prior to leaving Russia, she graduated from college in St. Petersburg with a degree in computer science. Yanina received her nursing degree from Molloy College in 2001 and received her Nurse Practioner degree from Stony Brook University in 2006.

Yanina currently lives in Queens and enjoys the diversity of the different neighborhoods that are in the borough.

She enjoys going to the movies, going out to eat, and visiting museums. Her favorite artist is Salvador Dali. Yanina says her favorite way to spend her free time is visiting new places. She loves to travel and she tries to do it as often as possible. Her favorite destinations to travel to, besides her native St. Petersburg, typically have a beach and an ocean.

Being a nurse in the ED can be very challenging, but it has many rewards as well. Helping people who are very sick who come in to the Emergency Room to feel better is a very satisfying. Yanina says that working at Jamaica Hospital is like being with family. Ever work swell together. We are very fortunate to have Yanina as a member of our team.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Diabetes and the Myths that go with it.

Diabetes is a serious illness. It affects 30 million people in the United States. There are many facts that we know about the disease, and not surprisingly, many myths associated with it as well.

 

 

Some of these myths include:

  • You can catch diabetes from someone else. False  Diabetes is not contagious
  • People with diabetes catch more colds and other illnesses. False. Diabetics aren’t any more at risk for catching a cold than anyone else.
  • People with diabetes can’t eat sugar. False. Sugar should be consumed in small quantities as part of a balanced meal.
  • Only overweight  people get diabetes. False. A  person can be slim, medium build or heavy and still be a diabetic.
  • People who have diabetes shouldn’t drive. False. People with diabetes can do  anything a person who doesn’t have diabetes does.
  • Type II diabetes is not as serious as Type I. False. Every form of diabetes is to be taken seriously. It is just treated differently.
  • Nobody in my family has diabetes therefore I won’t get it. False. While it does run in families, anyone is at risk regardless of family history.
  • Borderline diabetes is not real diabetes. False. It may only mean you are at higher risk of developing diabetes.
  • Eating fruit is bad for diabetes. False. Fruit should be eaten in small portions. Excessive amounts may cause a problem because fruit contains carbohydrates.

Speak to your physician if you would like to clarify the facts about diabetes and your ability to do things. You can schedule an appointment with a physician at Jamaica Hospital by calling 718-206-6742.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Employee Spotlight Shines on Jo-Ann Campudoni

This month, Jamaica Hospital Medical Center is proud to shine its Employee Spotlight on Jo-Ann Campudoni, Manager at TJH Medical Services, P.C.

Jo-Ann is a native of Queens, New York and grew up in Rockaway Beach, where she still resides to this day.

Jo-Ann graduated from Beach Channel High School in Rockaway and attended Andrews University in Michigan where she majored in Psychology. She has three amazing children of which she is very proud. She has a son who is currently serving in the Coast Guard, a daughter who is a Corporal in the Marines and a younger daughter who works as a customer service supervisor for FedEx. Jo-Ann comes from a very large family; she is the youngest of eight children. Her siblings live in various parts of the country and she wishes that they could see each other more frequently than they do.

Her philosophy on life is to get the most out of it as you can. She believes, “Life may not be perfect but you have to make it an adventure and go ever upward.” In her free time, she enjoys going to concerts, movies, reading books and meeting new people and learning about their experiences. Jo-Ann loves to dance and listen to music. She studied classical ballet, jazz, and contemporary dance. When she was in her teens she danced in the Alvin Ailey Dance Cadre. Her interest in music has brought her to hosting her own Internet radio show which can be found on social media outlets and gives her the opportunity to meet people in the musical world.

Jo-Ann believes in treating each patient with great respect and compassion. She feels that her experiences in life have taught her how much people appreciate being treated well. She enjoys working with her team at TJH because they work together so well. It is very much like a family in her department. Everyone works together to make the patient experience a good one. Jo-Ann looks forward to working with the team for a long time which is a goal we hope she achieves.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

What is a hernia ?

A hernia occurs when an organ or body part pushes through a weak spot in muscle or connective tissue into a part of the body that it isn’t supposed to be in. While some hernias can occur at birth, others may form later in life.  These types of hernias may occur as a result of heavy lifting, straining, pregnancy and obesity.

There are several types of hernias that include:

  • Inguinal hernias – Occurs when a part of the intestine pushes into the inguinal canal. Most commonly seen in males.
  • Femoral hernia -Occurs when the femoral artery and vein pass through the canal between the abdomen and the groin. Most often seen in females.
  • Epigastric hernia – Occurs when a small piece of fat protrudes through a weak spot in the abdominal muscles  located between the belly button and the breastbone
  • Umbilical hernia – Occurs when a portion of the intestine pushes through the abdominal wall next to the belly button
  • Hiatal hernia – Occurs when the stomach pushes through the diaphragm into the chest and causes heartburn
  • Incisional hernia – Occurs when a portion of the intestine pushes through the abdominal wall where surgery had been performed previously

The symptoms of a hernia often depend on where it is located. Some hernias will cause pain while there are others that only have physical signs, such as a bulging out of the skin, but aren’t painful. When a portion of the intestine pushes through a muscle and becomes trapped it can be very painful block the intestinal blood supply. These hernias require urgent surgical attention. A hernia can be prevented by avoiding lifting heavy objects improperly, maintaining proper weigh, care when coughing, having a diet that contains adequate fiber, and avoiding excessive straining during a bowel movement.

Treatment for a hernia depends on its location, size and the amount of discomfort. In some cases surgery isn’t necessary and the hernia can be pushed into place and held there by a device called a truss. Surgical options include closing the weak spot in the muscle with stitches, , using a mesh to reinforce the weak muscle that the hernia is pushing through, and laparoscopic surgery to repair the defect that is causing the hernia.

If you are experiencing any discomfort from a hernia, it is important to seek professional help to learn what the options are to repair it. You can schedule an appointment with a surgeon at Jamaica Hospital by calling 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

What is fibromyalgia and why is it painful ?

Fibromyalgia is a condition thought to be caused by an increase in the way the brain processes pain sensation throughout the musculoskeletal system of the body. The result is a chronic sensation of pain that is often debilitating and life changing. Women tend to be affected by fibromyalgia more than men but the reason for that is unclear. In some people, fibromyalgia appears after a trauma, a surgical procedure, an infection, or after a stressful event. There also may be some correlation to it running in families.
Scientists believe that there may be an overstimulation of the pain receptors that causes the symptoms.  Symptoms of fibromyalgia include:
• Pain all over the body
• Fatigue
• Difficulty focusing
• Migraine headaches
• Anxiety
• Depression
Fibromyalgia is diagnosed through a physical exam and blood tests that examines thyroid function, red and white blood cell count, rheumatoid arthritis factor and the erythrocyte sedimentation rate. If a person has pain for three months and no obvious medical reason for it, it might be reason to rule out fibromyalgia.
There is no one method of treating fibromyalgia that is completely effective.
• Treatment options include:
• Physical therapy
• Pain relievers
• Anti-depressants
• Getting adequate rest
• Acupuncture
• Regular exercise
If you have symptoms of fibromyalgia and would like to schedule an appointment with a doctor at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Employee Spotlight Shines on David Hutt

This month we are proud to shine our Employee Spotlight on David Hutt, Supportive Care Associate in the Operating Room. David is a native of Westchester County, having grown up in Peekskill where he attended Peekskill High School. David joined Jamaica Hospital 23 years ago, first rotating between units before moving to 3 North and currently in the operating room where he has worked for 21 years.

David is very proud of the work he does at Jamaica Hospital. He says that his co-workers are like family to him. Everyone works well together. He also enjoys interacting every day with his patients. He has received many compliments from the people he has helped. He credits his compassion and sense of humor for helping to make the patients’ experience a pleasant one. He looks forward to many more years of working at the hospital with his team.

David is known as an avid sports fan. His favorite team is the Pittsburgh Steelers, and he also roots for the Pittsburgh Penguins, The L.A. Lakers, and the New York Mets. He enjoys listening to all types of music, going to the movies, concerts, and sometimes just staying home and watching TV. Two of his favorite vacations were spent on a cruise and also when he went to Cancun. The best way he can think of to spend his free time is with family and close friends.

David has been living in Queens for 33 years, and the last 7 with his wife in Ozone Park and says that he really enjoys the cultural diversity and fast pace of the neighborhood and the city.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.