Food Allergies: What Parents Should Know

Food Allergies According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), “Food allergies are a growing food safety and public health concern that affect an estimated 4%–6% of children in the United States.”

The most common foods known to cause allergies in children include eggs, peanuts, tree nuts, milk, soy, fish and shellfish.  If a child is severely allergic to any of these foods, they should avoid them at all costs.  Exposure or consumption can lead to a serious reaction known as anaphylaxis, which can result in death.

Symptoms of anaphylaxis usually occur within minutes and may include:

  • Difficulty breathing
  • Weak and rapid pulse
  • Throat tightening or the feeling of the throat closing
  • Low blood pressure
  • Dizziness or fainting
  • Swollen tongue
  • Nausea, vomiting or diarrhea

In the event a child is experiencing anaphylaxis, do not wait to see if symptoms will go away.  Treatment must be administered immediately.  If the child carries an epinephrine auto-injector (EpiPen), use this right away to begin emergency care.

Doctors strongly recommend that the Epipen is administered exactly as instructed. According to www.epipen.com , when administering the medication to a young child, one should:

  • Remove the Auto-Injector from the clear carrier tube.
  • Flip open the yellow cap of your EpiPen® or the green cap of your EpiPen Jr® carrier tube.
  • Tip and slide the auto-injector out of the carrier tube.
  • Hold the auto-injector in your fist with the orange tip pointing downward. Blue to the sky, orange to the thigh®.
  • With your other hand, remove the blue safety release by pulling straight up without bending or twisting it.
  • Hold the leg firmly in place while administering an injection.
  • Place the orange tip against the middle of the outer thigh (upper leg) at a right angle (perpendicular) to the thigh.
  • Swing and push the auto-injector firmly until it “clicks.” The click signals that the injection has started.
  • Hold firmly in place for 3 seconds (count slowly 1, 2, 3).
  • Remove the auto-injector from the thigh. The orange tip will extend to cover the needle. If the needle is still visible, do not attempt to reuse it.
  • Massage the injection area for 10 seconds.

For complete instructions on how to properly use the Epipen, please visit https://www.epipen.com/-/media/files/epipen/howtouseepipenautoinjector.pdf or www.epipen.com

If the child does not carry an EpiPen, and is experiencing symptoms of anaphylaxis, get emergency help immediately. Every second counts.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Jamaica Hospital: Raising Awareness About Food Allergies

Allergy food and beverages on blackboardMay has been designated as Food Allergy Action Month in an effort to educate Americans about food allergies and to support those who suffer from them.

Recent surveys indicate that 15 million Americans now suffer from food allergies. This number indicates that food allergies are much more common than previously believed and the number of people with allergies is steadily growing. It is now estimated that one out of every 13 children has a food allergy.

An allergic reaction occurs when the body’s immune system mistakenly identifies a food component as a hazardous substance and attacks it. The effects of food allergies may appear on the skin, in the respiratory passage, or in the gastrointestinal tract. The symptoms of food allergies may vary from mild to severe, and in extreme cases, they can even be fatal.

Minor reactions include:
• Skin rash
• Eczema
• Diarrhea
• Stomach cramps
• Nausea

Serious Reactions Include:
• Obstructive inflammation of the tongue and respiratory tract
• Panting and wheezing
• Lack of oxygen, leading to blue lips
• Unconsciousness
• Drop in pulse rate

Anaphylaxis is a very serious allergic reaction that can cause death. This type of allergic reaction requires immediate action and medical attention. If you or a loved one has a severe food allergy, you must be prepared for an emergency. Learn the signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis and know what the emergency care plan is. It may include the administration of epinephrine, a life-saving drug.

Over 170 different foods have been reported to cause an allergic reaction, but the food products that cause the most reactions are:
• Soy
• Milk
• Fish / Shellfish
• Peanuts / Tree Nuts
• Eggs
• Wheat

There is currently no cure for food allergies. To prevent an allergic reaction, it is important for the person with the allergy to stay away from foods that cause symptoms. Contact with even the smallest amounts of the allergen can cause serious problems. To avoid an allergic reaction, take the following precautions:
• Learn to carefully read food labels and ask about ingredients in prepared foods
• Wash your hands with soap and warm water before and after touching food
• Use clean, uncontaminated utensils when preparing foods
• Educate others about food allergies.

Every year in the United States, approximately 30,000 individuals are brought to hospital emergency departments and 150 people die due to severe allergic reactions. Flushing Hospital joins the effort to raise awareness about food allergies and urges everyone to learn more about this growing, yet manageable issue.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.