How smoking affects nutrition

Smoking plays a large role in the body’s ability to absorb and process nutrients. The nicotine in cigarettes is a potent chemical that negatively affects the systems of the body and how they function. One of the functions that nicotine affects is the body’s ability to maintain the proper level of nutrients.
Vitamin and mineral absorption is also diminished by nicotine, and is more likely to be drained from stores within the body. Vitamin C which the body needs to prevent organ damage is depleted when nicotine is present. People who smoke also tend to have a higher incidence of osteoporosis because less vitamin D absorption leads to less calcium available to strengthen bones.
Nicotine suppresses a person’s appetite by interacting with the brain and central nervous system. One of the ways it occurs is by altering the way we detect flavor.
Quitting smoking will help to restore the body to a better nutritional status. Until a person is able to stop smoking completely, it is a good idea to add fruits and vegetables to the diet. This will help the body by making more minerals and vitamins available to be absorbed. Jamaica Hospital offers a program to help people who are interested in quitting. To learn more, please call 718-206-8494.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Information About Varicose Veins

According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, approximately half of Americans age 50 and older have varicose veins. These veins are most commonly located in the legs, appear to bulge from the skin and are dark purple or blue in color.

ThinkstockPhotos-483873488The veins in a person’s legs carry blood back up to the heart and should only allow blood to flow in one direction. However, when the valves in a person’s veins become weak and allow blood to flow away from the heart, blood pools and the veins in that area become stretched or enlarged, thereby, creating a varicose vein.

While varicose veins are very common among both men and women, there are several factors that can increase a person’s risk of being affected. These include:
 Heredity
 Hormonal changes, such as puberty, pregnancy, and menopause
 Increasing age
 Obesity
 Sun exposure

Not only can varicose veins cause discomfort and embarrassment for the men and women who have them, but they can also sometimes lead to more serious health conditions. If left untreated, varicose veins can lead to:

 Blood Clots- These are extremely dangerous, as they may dislodge from the vein and travel to the lungs or heart, preventing either from functioning properly.
 Sores and Ulcers- Varicose veins may lead to sores and ulcers of the skin because of long-term buildup of fluid.

Varicose veins may also cause ongoing swelling, rashes, and pain, and can increase a person’s chances of infection.

Varicose veins may signal a higher risk for circulatory problems. If you have varicose veins that cause pain, swelling, itching, tiredness, or numbness in the legs, you should seek medical attention. Jamaica Hospital Department of Vascular Surgery offers a variety of options to treat varicose veins.
Treatment options available include:

 Sclerotherapy: A solution is injected to seal off the area in which blood is pooling.
 Laser treatment: Without the use of needles or incisions, strong bursts of light are delivered precisely onto varicose veins to make them fade and eventually disappear.
 Endovenous Radiofrequency: A catheter is inserted into the vein and radiofrequency or laser energy seals the vein wall. This approach is used in treating deeper varicose veins.
 Surgical litigation and stripping: Varicose veins are removed entirely.

If you have varicose veins and would like to schedule a consultation with a vascular surgeon at Jamaica Hospital, please call 718-206-7108.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

SNACK CHIPS THAT WON’T GO STRAIGHT TO YOUR HIPS!

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With the holiday season in full swing and snacking at an all-time high, you may be interested in this delicious and healthy alternative potato chips for your party table…

Cracked Pepper Potato Chips with Onion Dip

Ingredient’s for the chips:

  • 3 Large russet potatoes (2 ¼  pounds total), sliced into 1/8-inch thick rounds
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 teaspoons coarsely ground black pepper
  • Salt

 

Ingredient’s for the dip:

  • 2 teaspoons olive oil
  • 1 small onion, minced
  • 2 scallions, thinly slices, greens and whites separated
  • 1 ¼ cups nonfat Greek style yogurt or 1 2/3 cups regular nonfat plain yogurt
  • ¼ cup of mayonnaise
  • ¾ teaspoon garlic powder
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ teaspoon pepper

How to make this recipe:

Chips – Toss potatoes in a large bowl with 2 tablespoons of oil, and pepper until well coated.   Preheat oven to 450 degrees F.  Arrange potato slices in 1 layer on 2 cookie sheets.  Bake for 20 to 25 minutes until chips are crisped and lightly browned.  Remove from oven, season with salt and cool.

Dip – Heat oil over a medium heat and add onions and scallion whites.  Cook, stirring often, until golden brown and soft, about 10 minutes.  Remove from heat and allow to cool.  If using  regular yogurt, place it in a strainer lined with a paper towel and set the strainer over a bowl.  Let the yogurt drain and thicken for 20 minutes.

Combine onions with thickened or Greek style yogurt, mayonnaise, onion powder, garlic powder, salt pepper and scallion greens and stir well to incorporate.  Chill for 1 hour to let flavors meld.

Serve with chips

Excellent source of Vitamin C

Good source of Potassium

For more healthy snack recipes visit http://www.foodnetwork.com/healthy/packages/healthy-every-week/healthy-appetizer-recipes/healthy-appetizer-recipes.html

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

How “Annual” Is Your Annual Physical?

HypertesionThinkstockPhotos-477722758A.  Yearly

B. Bi-Yearly

C. When I don’t feel good

D. I don’t do doctors

 

An annual exam is a good way of tracking your health progress.  Some of the benefits are:

  • Primary prevention
  • To identify risk factors for common chronic diseases
  • To detect disease that has no apparent symptoms (secondary prevention)
  • A way for the doctor to counsel people to promote healthy behavior
  • To update clinical data since your last check-up
  • To enhance the relationship betweenyou and your doctor

If you are interested in scheduling an exam, Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center is centrally located and has convenient hours.  Call 718-206-7001 for an appointment.

 

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

VEGAN CREAMY PUMPKIN SOUPN (GLUTEN FREE)

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For a creamy and vegan pumpkin soup recipe sprinkled with almonds and fresh rosemary, try the recipe below.

Serves: 3

Prep time – 5 minutes

Cook time – 25 minutes

Total time – 30 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • ½ onion, diced
  • ½ pumpkin, peeled and cubed
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 tablespoon fresh rosemary, diced
  • 4-5 cups vegetable broth
  • ½-1 cup coconut milk

Instructions

  1. Heat oil in pot over medium heat. Add onion and cook for a few minutes until translucent. Add pumpkin and garlic and continue to cook for a few more minutes.
  2. Add rosemary and vegetable broth. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to low and simmer until pumpkin is soft and cooked through. Add salt to taste.
  3. Puree soup in a blender (in batches) and return to the pot.
  4. Add coconut milk and simmer for another minute or two.

Give this recipe a try. It is simply delicious and healthy too.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

September is Childhood Obesity Awareness Month

September is National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month. Childhood obesity affects approximately one in five children in the United States. Obesity is measured by taking a child’s body-mass index (BMI) and evaluating where this number falls on a BMI age-growth chart. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has developed a table to make it possible to compare the BMI with those of other children of the same age and height. Other factors that need to be considered are the type of body frame, musculature, and the child’s development pattern.

There are many reasons why a child may become obese. Often obese children come from families where there are poor eating habits, and lack of physical activity. Other contributing factors can include stress, boredom, and depression as well as living in a community with limited accessibility to healthy food choices.

Obesity in children puts them at risk of developing chronic illnesses later in life such as diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, stroke, arthritis, and heart disease. It also makes children more prone to depression, low self-esteem and susceptible to bullying.

Ways to control a child’s weight include:

  • Limit fast food
  • Increase fruits and vegetables in the diet
  • Limit sweet drinks
  • Limit desserts and unhealthy snacks
  • Eat together as a family when possible
  • Regulate portion sizes
  • Increase physical activity, not just exercise
  • Decrease the amount of time spent watching TV or on the computer

Jamaica Hospital strives to help prevent childhood obesity by participating in workshops throughout the year at schools and at community health fairs by providing educational materials and guidance on proper nutrition. To speak with a pediatrician about childhood obesity, please call 718-206-7001 to schedule an appointment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Why Do We Snore?

hat do half of all Americans do, but very few admit to, partly because they are unaware that they are doing it? The answer is snore.

ThinkstockPhotos-502743167Snoring occurs when the flow of air is partially obstructed in some way while we sleep. As air flows past relaxed tissue in the throat, the resulting vibrating sound is snoring. Snoring can take place for a variety of reasons, including:

 

• The anatomy of your mouth – Having an elongated soft palate or uvula can narrow the opening from the nose to the throat

• Being overweight – Those who are overweight have extra, bulky throat tissue that may narrow the airways

• Obstructed nasal airways – Allergies, a nasal infection or a deviated septum can all contribute to snoring

• Alcohol consumption – Drinking alcohol before bed can relax muscles in the tongue and throat can obstruct the airways

• Sleep apnea – This is a serious condition when your throat tissues partially or completely block your airway, preventing your from breathing

Unless you have an upset spouse inform you that you are snoring, you may be unaware that you have a problem. Look out for the following symptoms if you suspect you are snoring:

• Excessive daytime sleepiness
• Difficulty concentrating
• Sore throat
• Restless sleep
• Chest pain at night
• High blood pressure

To determine the cause of your snoring, your doctor will review your signs and symptoms, review your medical history, and perform an examination. Your doctor may request an x-ray or other imaging tests to check the structure of your airway. To determine is sleep apnea is the reason for your snoring, a sleep study to monitor brain waves, breathing and heart rate, and blood oxygen levels may also be ordered.

Lifestyle changes including losing weight, avoiding consuming alcohol before bed and changing your sleep position by either raising your head or sleeping on your side can reduce the liklihood of snoring. Other aids, such as nasal strips, form fitting mouth pieces, and short term decongestants for allergies or infections can also be helpful.

If these efforts prove unsuccessful, there are a variety of surgical and non-surgical interventions that your doctor could recommend. One of the most common therapies is continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), which involves wearing a pressurized mask that pumps air through your airways while you sleep.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Smoking Cessation and Weight Gain

One of the reasons that people don’t want to stop smoking is because they are worried about gaining weight. Smoking increases the rate of metabolism so when a person quits, their metabolism slows and they tend to eat a little bit more than they did when they were still smoking. As a result, people will typically gain four to 10 pounds when they quit. When you snack between meals, over the course of time, you can slowly be adding on the pounds. Nicotine is an appetite suppressant, so it reduces these cravings. Smoking also makes people feel good, so that is another reason that people will eat sweet  foods such as cookies and cake to replace cigarettes.
If you find yourself craving something sweet to eat, there are healthy alternatives:
• Fruits and vegetables
• Fat free or low fat snacks
• Sugar free candies
Drinking plenty of water and brushing your teeth frequently throughout the day will keep your breath fresh and will take away the urge to smoke.
Try finding alternate activities that will keep you busy so that you won’t have the desire to reach for a cigarette. It might be helpful to go to a movie theater, take a long walk, use the stairs instead of an elevator when possible, read a book and spend time with people who are supportive and who don’t smoke.
Smoking is a leading factor in heart disease, cancer, stroke, and many other illnesses. Speak to your physician to learn about ways to quit and how to manage the changes your body will experience. If you would like to speak with a physician at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-7001 to schedule an appointment.Weight Gain

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

BBQ Leftover’s Tips and Yummy Recipe

BBQ-Chicken-Bites-DSC_0787When you barbeque, you always seem to prepare more food than you need. Of course, this will leave you with leftovers more often than not. So what do you do with all that extra chicken?

If you are planning on finishing off your leftover chicken within a few days, wrap it tightly and keep it in the refrigerator. If you want to keep it for more than a few days, wrap the chicken in foil and seal it in a zip lock bag. Try to get as much air as possible out of the bag to preserve the leftovers for several months.

Take precaution when you are reheating your leftovers.  You do not have to reheat it on as low a temperature and slowly as you did the first time.  An oven temperature of around 325 degrees will work great. Do not overcook your chicken.  Overcooking can cause the chicken to become dry.

Properly reheated, your barbecued chicken should be just about as good as it was the day you first cooked it.

Now that we have discussed how to preserve your BBQ chicken, here’s a great way to reheat that chicken. Click the link below and follow the simple recipe that will take your leftover chicken and make it appear like an entirely different meal!

http://addapinch.com/cooking/bbq-chicken-bites-recipe/

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

The Fight Against Obesity is a Family Affair

family dinners-517421771The childhood obesity problem in the United States has reached epidemic proportions with many political leaders and health advocates turning their attention to bringing awareness to this issue.

Interventions have been suggested, school lunches have become healthier and more attention has been given to the benefit of outside play, recess, and cutting back on the consumption of processed foods.

One of the most effective solutions to the issue of childhood obesity may be a simple one; scheduling time for a healthy family dinner. The ritual of eating meals together, as a family, has shown to greatly improve healthy eating habits.

Studies have shown that families who dine while watching television tend to be heavier than those who make to time to sit down, together, for a meal on a regular basis. As a parent, eating with your family will give you the opportunity to encourage our children to eat mindfully, reinforce healthy eating habits and teach your children to eat slowly.

Some idea’s to make family meals regular events at your house are:

  • Turn off the TV
  • Make a date to have a meal together
  • Share the meal preparation process with the whole family
  • Select a healthy alternative to a favorite meal

In addition, eating is about so much more than the food and nutrients we receive from it. Meal time should be pleasurable, social and a time to connect with each other.

If you or someone you know is struggling with obesity, contact the Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory care Center to schedule an appointment with one of our licensed Nutritionist’s at 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.