June is Cataract Awareness Month

The American Academy of Ophthalmology has designated June as Cataract Awareness Month. The purpose of this designation is to help educate the public on what cataracts are and how to treat them once they are diagnosed.

Cataracts are a clouding of the lens of the eye. This will result in blurry vision, and since less light is being transmitted, objects will appear darker as well.

It is estimated that 25 million people in the United States age 40 and older will be diagnosed with a cataract, and by the time people reach the age of 80, more than half of the population of the United States will be affected with the disease.

Risk factors for developing cataracts include:

  • Age
  • Diabetes
  • Smoking
  • Prolonged exposure to sunlight
  • Obesity
  • High blood pressure
  • Hereditary factors
  • Prior eye injuries

Cataracts are classified by what causes them. Age is the biggest factor, followed by eye trauma, congenital causes and secondary to taking certain medications like steroids.

There are a few ways to lower the risk of developing cataracts, but they may not be completely successful. 

  • Wearing sunglasses when outdoors
  • A diet rich in vitamin C foods
  • Avoiding smoking

Treatment for cataracts involves a surgical procedure which removes the old lens of the eye  and replacing it with a synthetic one. It is a very common procedure and considered relatively safe. If you would like to schedule an appointment with an eye doctor at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-5900.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

This Month We Shine Our Employee Spotlight on Jayson de Jesus

This month we are proud to shine our employee spotlight on Jayson de Jesus, a Patient Information Representative on 4 South.

Jayson has worked at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center for over 25 years. He enjoys the daily interactions he has with his colleagues, many of whom he considers to be his friends, as well as with patients and their families. Jayson is very much a “people person” and is known by everyone to be caring, kind and always willing to help. He is always interested in learning about other people’s cultures.

Jayson is originally from the Philippines, where he completed most of his education. He attended elementary school at GSCS, high school at St. Paul College and graduated from the Central Escolar University in Manila.   Jayson continued his education at St. John’s University when he first moved to Hollis, New York.  He now resides with his family in Nassau County. Jayson has been married to his wife for over 18 years and they have a son who is 17 years old and a daughter who is 5 years old. Also sharing their home are their pet birds. Spending time with his family is one of his favorite things to do.

Around the hospital Jayson is known for his skills as a DJ. He has kept every holiday party lively with his musical talent. In his free time Jayson enjoys gardening, carpentry, playing basketball, and camping. His hobbies include working on cars and collecting sneakers.

Jayson enjoys traveling and has visited over 30 of the 50 states so far, the furthest one being Hawaii. He also enjoys eating all types of food.  Jayson is very active in community activities and takes great pride in being an Assistant Scout Master with the Boy Scouts.

We are very proud to have Jayson as part of the Jamaica Hospital team and we look forward to having him with us for many more years.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Can You Get Covid-19 More Than Once ?

The COVID-19 virus is a new disease and there is still much to be learned about it. One of the questions people have is whether or not they can be re-infected if they have already had the virus. The simple answer is “Yes”.

Typically when a person is infected with a virus their body develops a certain amount of immunity which lessens the chances that they will become re-infected with the same virus. However, in the case of COVID-19, a small but significant amount of people have been re-infected. A lot has to do with the amount of time that elapses between the first bout and the second. In some cases the second bout of COVID-19 is less severe than the first but there have been cases where the second bout is more severe than the first. At the present time, nobody knows how long the immunity our bodies develop to the virus lasts. Because the COVID-19 virus is so new, there needs to be more research done and more data gathered to say with certainty how the virus acts.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Our Employee Spotlight Shines On Jonathan Toval

We are proud to shine our Employee Spotlight on Jonathan Toval, Lead Medical Assistant in the Department of Orthopedic Surgery.

Jonathan has been at Jamaica Hospital for the past eight years. He was born and spent the first few years of his life in Lima, Peru and moved to New York City in 1999. He attended Intermediate School 61 in Queens, and graduated from John Bowne High School in 2005. Jonathan currently lives in Forest Hills. In his free time Jonathan enjoys spending time with his friends and his family. His two main past times are playing competitive soccer and poker playing. His favorite soccer team is Real Madrid. He enjoys traveling to any place there is a beach, but his travel plans have been curtailed in the past year due to the pandemic.

He really values his relationship with his family and enjoys their company. They provide him with  wonderful conversations and lots of laughter which they frequently share with one another.  He enjoys all types of music  and believes that listening and dancing to salsa makes him happy. His favorite type of food is Peruvian but he also enjoys sushi and steak.

Being in a position to work with a diverse group of patients is something that Jonathan really likes. He enjoys being able to meet patients and colleagues at work who come from all over the world. This gives him an opportunity to learn other languages and about other cultures.  Working at Jamaica Hospital is like being at his second home and it has had a great influence on his life.

We are very happy to have Jonathan on our team for the past eight years and we look forward to having him remain with us for many years in the future.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

COVID-19 and the Potential for a Stroke

As more details are being learned about COVID-19,  evidence suggests that having the virus may increase the risk of stroke.  

A stroke may occur in patients who have contracted COVID for several reasons.  Here are a few believed to be contributing factors:

  • The pre-existence of underlying cardiovascular conditions such as hypertension or heart disease
  • The development of infections and inflammation caused by COVID that can lead to stroke
  • The formation of blood clots which can lead to stroke

Studies have shown that some COVID positive individuals are more at risk than others for having a stroke.  It has been found that males, 65 years of age or older, are more likely than females to have an ischemic stroke after contracting the virus and African Americans are at higher risk than Caucasians.

Research also indicates that people who have a stroke and COVID spend about twice as long in the hospital as patients who do not have COVID (22 days versus 10 days).  Patients with COVID who have a stroke are also twice as likely to die than non-COVID stroke patients.

If you are at risk of having a stroke or other cardiovascular issues you should visit your doctor for regular checkups to prevent complications.  It is also important to take preventative measures to avoid the COVID-19 virus. This includes wearing a face mask when in public spaces, proper and frequent hand washing, and getting vaccinated.

To schedule an appointment with a cardiovascular specialist at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718- 206-7001

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

A Covid-19 Vaccine Myth

There are many myths being spread about the COVID-19 vaccines and this is causing some people to be hesitant about getting it. The vaccines currently being administered within the United States have been proven to be safe.

One myth is that the vaccines are made with egg-based products and people who are allergic to eggs may have a reaction. It should be clear that neither the Pfizer/BioNTech nor the Moderna COVID vaccines are made with egg-based products.

Even though these vaccines are not made with egg-based products, those who have a history of allergic reactions to vaccines should still mention this before receiving the vaccine. All patients, regardless of their history of allergic reactions should be monitored for 30 minutes after receiving the vaccine.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Irritable Bowel Syndrome Awareness Month

April is Irritable Bowel Syndrome Awareness Month (IBS). This is a condition that affects the large intestine resulting in the following symptoms:

  • Bloating
  • Gas
  • Nausea
  • Abdominal cramps
  • Diarrhea or constipation

There is no general rule of what to eat and what to avoid in treating IBS. A physician will go through a patient’s daily diet and see if there are certain foods that are more likely to act as triggers. The foods that physicians who treat this disease may recommend avoiding include:

  • Wheat
  • Carbonated Drinks
  • Dairy products
  • Beans
  • Cabbage

Some of these symptoms can be relieved by modifying the diet as well as taking certain medications.

The classifications of medications include:

Antibiotics

Anti-diarrheal agents

Anti-spasmodics

Prescription laxatives

Prescription pain medications

If you are experiencing recurring intestinal distress and would like to speak with a physician at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Employee Spotlight Shines on Devika Nanan

This month we are proud to shine our Employee Spotlight on Devika Nanan. a Medical Assistant (PAR) in our Ambulatory Care Department. Devika came to Jamaica Hospital Medical Center five years ago, first as a volunteer for 18 months and in her current position thereafter.

Devika is a native of the Caribbean twin isles of Trinidad and Tobago where she grew up and attended school. After successfully completing seven years at the elementary level she then continued on to secondary school. While in high school she was exposed to a wide variety of disciplines but ultimately decided to focus her attention on Business Principles, Management and Spanish. Before coming to the United States she also attended the Lakshimi Girls Hindu College.

After completing her studies, she soon became a mother. Wanting to provide her children with a better way of life, she emigrated to New York and settled in Queens where she currently resides. She worked hard and was determined to continue her education.  Devika enrolled at Garden State Technical College in New Jersey where she trained as a Medical Assistant.

Devika wears many hats. She is a wife, mother of three and grandmother of two. She enjoys spending time with her family which is very important to her. In her free time she enjoys reading, and listening to music. Her favorite types of food are West Indian and Hibachi. When she goes on vacation, she likes to visit different beaches and take her children to historical places.

Devika enjoys working with her colleagues at Jamaica Hospital. She also enjoys her interactions with our patients, as this allows her friendly personality to shine. We are very fortunate to have Devika as a member of our team and look forward to many more years as one of our valued employees.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

National Poison Prevention Week

The National Poison Prevention Week was established by the U.S. Congress  in 1961 to bring public attention to the dangers of poisoning and how to prevent it.

Each year, more than 2 million poisonings are reported to the nation’s poison control centers. The American Association of Poison Control Centers reports that 93 percent of poisonings occur in the home, 45 percent involve children under the age of six and the majority of fatal poisonings occur in older adults.

There are several ways that some poisonings can be prevented. These include keeping all chemicals out of reach from children, reading dosages and labels on all medications, and knowing how certain medications react when taken together. Here are a few basic steps to take if a poisoning takes place:

For inhaled poison get the person fresh air immediately

For skin poison take off the person’s clothes and rinse skin with fresh water for 15 – 20 minutes

For poison in the eyes, rinse the eyes out with fresh water for 15 – 20 minutes

For an overdose of medicine, call 9-1-1  immediately

In all cases of poisoning, contact the local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. Treatment advice will depend on the type of poison, the person’s age, and medical history.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

World Kidney Day

Today is recognized as World Kidney Day. This year the slogan is “Living Well with Kidney Disease” because the aim is to educate people who are affected to manage it successfully.

The kidneys are two, fist-sized organs in your lower back. They maintain overall health by serving following functions:

  • Filtering waste out of 200 liters of blood each day
  • Regulating of the body’s salt, potassium and acid content
  • Removing toxins from the body.
  • Balancing the body’s fluids
  • Releasing hormones that regulate blood pressure
  • Producing an active form of vitamin D that promotes strong, healthy bones
  • Controlling the production of red blood cells

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease and Control, some quick facts on Kidney Disease are:

  • Kidney disease is the 9th leading cause of death in the country.
  • More than 26 million Americans have kidney disease, and most don’t know it.
  • There are over 95,000 people waiting for kidney transplants.
  • Currently, more than 590,000 people have kidney failure in the U.S. today.

Often times, kidney failure can be prevented or delayed through early detection and proper treatment of underlying disease such as diabetes and high blood pressure which can slow additional damage to the kidneys.

If you are 18 years or older with diabetes, high blood pressure, cardiovascular disease or a family history of kidney disease, you should schedule an appointment with your doctor and ask that you be screened for kidney disease.

If you would like to make an appointment to have your Kidney’s checked, you can schedule an appointment at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center by calling 718-206-7001 for an appointment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.