What is Osteoarthritis ?

Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis, currently affecting  over 32 million Americans. This form of arthritis is known as the “wear and tear” disease because while it can affect almost any joint, it most commonly affects the joints in the knees, hips, hands, and spine that are subject to the most amount of movement. Women tend to be affected by osteoarthritis more often than men.

Osteoarthritis occurs when the cartilage, which is the slippery tissue which cushions your bones when they rub against one another deteriorates over time due to weight, stress, injuries or genetic factors. When this happens, people with osteoarthritis will experience a variety of issues including::

  • Joint pain
  • Joint Deformity
  • Decrease in joint mobility
  • Swelling of a joint
  • Joint crackling

Diagnosing osteoarthritis can be performed by taking an x-ray, a magnetic resonance image (MRI), and physical manipulation of the joint. Examining the joint fluid can help differentiate osteoarthritis from other types of arthritis.

Osteoarthritis may not be able to be completely avoided but there are ways to slow down its progress and to treat it. Measures to minimize osteoarthritis include:

  • Keeping active
  • Maintaining a proper weight
  • Participating in physical therapy
  • Taking medications to reduce symptoms such as acetaminophen and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS)
  • Applying transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS)
  • Receiving cortisone injections into the joint
  • Receiving injections of hyaluronic acid
  • Having Joint replacement procedures

If you are experiencing symptoms of osteoarthritis, speak with your physician to discuss what treatment option is best for you. If  you would like to schedule an appointment with a physician at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

A Delicious Fall Recipe

Today is the first day of Fall and a perfect time to prepare a delicious butternut squash casserole to welcome in the season. Here is a recipe from delish.com made with butternut squash. https://www.delish.com/cooking/recipe-ideas/a40509027/butternut-squash-casserole-recipe/

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

September is Cholesterol Education Month

September is designated as National Cholesterol Education Month. The importance of this designation is to bring awareness of the health risks associated with high cholesterol.  

One of the major conditions associated with high cholesterol is heart disease, a leading cause of death in the United States. People who have high levels of cholesterol are twice as likely to have heart disease than those who have levels in the normal range.

The liver produces two types of cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL). When the level of LDL cholesterol, also known as the “bad” cholesterol is too high we can develop health problems such as peripheral vascular disease, high blood pressure, stroke, kidney failure, and heart attack. We can reduce our risk of complications by making lifestyle changes.

Ways to reduce “bad” cholesterol LDL and raise HDL “good”  cholesterol include:

  • Quit smoking
  • Exercise regularly
  • Avoid saturated fats and trans fats such as fried food, pizza, margarine and pastries
  • Eat foods with unsaturated fats including olive oil, olives, nuts such as almonds, cashews, macadamia, pecans and canola oil
  • Eat foods with polyunsaturated fat containing Omega-3 fatty acids including salmon, mackerel, herring and tuna
  • Eat high fiber foods such as fruits, beans, oat cereal
  • Limit alcohol consumption
  • Use Psyllium as a dietary supplement

There are no symptoms associated with high cholesterol, so the only way to assess it is through a blood test. It is recommended by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to have cholesterol level in the blood checked every five years after the age of 20 and it should be a part of your annual physical as you get older. If you would like to schedule an appointment with a physician at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Employee Spotlight Shines on Maynard Lantimo

This month we are proud to shine our Employee Spotlight on Maynard Lantimo, Epic Clinical Education Specialist.

Maynard has been employed at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center for 29 years. He was raised in Brooklyn and then moved to Queens. He currently lives in Valley Stream on Long island.

Maynard went to  elementary school at Holy Innocents School in Brooklyn, then began high school at Paul Robeson High School in Brooklyn as a lower freshman. He then transferred to Hillcrest High School in Queens from where he graduated. Maynard later received his Associates degree from Queensborough Community College, and his Bachelor’s degree from Hunter College. He completed his post graduate degree at the Career Institute of Health and Technology for Networking Specialist while also becoming a Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer.

In his free time, Maynard like to keep physically fit. He enjoys running, bicycling, and strength training. He has completed seven full marathons and eight half marathons. He is currently only three marathons away from getting the worldwide renowned Six Star Medal of the Abbot World Marathon Majors.

He likes to travel especially to Miami Beach Florida and to Jamaica. He loves music and says that it is a great motivator when he goes out running. He likes to listen to reggae, jazz, R&B, soca, pop music, soft rock, rap and also classical music.

One of the things most important to Maynard is balancing overall physical, mental, and spiritual health. His family, friends, and place of work have given him a wonderful blend of exciting energy that has helped him overcome many challenges.

Maynard likes working at Jamaica Hospital because throughout the years many of his colleagues have become friends and feel like they are part of his family which makes a healthy addition to his positive lifestyle. We look forward to Maynard continuing to work with us for many more years.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Shining Our Employee Spotlight on Keila Tapia

This month we are proud to shine our Employee Spotlight on Keila Tapia.

Keila has been with Jamaica Hospital Medical Center for eight years and is an administrative assistant in the Security Department. She grew up in the East New York section of Brooklyn and currently lives in Queens.

Keila attended P.S. 214, John Adams High School, received her bachelor’s degree in business administration from Medgar Evers College in 2010 and currently is studying for her master’s degree in health administration at Capella University.

Family and friends are the most important part of her life. Keila enjoys spending time with them in her free time. She also likes to go to concerts, spend time outdoors, watch baseball games and go out to eat. Her favorite types of food are Mexican and Italian. Keila enjoys many genres of entertainment; however, her favorite type of movie are horror movies and she likes to listen to Latin and R & B music.

When she has the opportunity Keila likes to travel to places that have warm climates and beautiful beaches. Some of the places she has been to are Puerto Rico, St. Maarten, and the Dominican Republic where she spends time with her loved ones.

Keila enjoys working at Jamaica Hospital because it provides opportunities to keep growing within the organization and also because people work together so well as a team. We look forward to having Keila continue with us for many more years.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Summer Skin Problems

Many people tend to spend more time outdoors during the summer months. This is a welcome change from the colder months when we spend most of our time indoors. However, more time spent outdoors can present challenges to the health of our skin.

These are a few of the conditions that can affect the skin during the summer months:

  • Sunburn – Caused by prolonged unprotected exposure to UV rays from the sun
  • Skin cancer – Caused by being exposed for prolonged periods of time to UV rays from the sun
  • Acne – Caused by bacteria on the surface of the skin mixing which blocks pores
  • Sun allergy – Caused by taking certain medications or having sensitivity to the sun
  • Plant rashes – Caused by coming in contact with poison oak, ivy, or sumac
  • Melasma – Caused by the sun making brown spots on the skin more noticeable
  • Prickly heat – Caused by blocked sweat glands which form tiny bumps on the surface of the skin
  • Seabather’s eruption – Caused by a reaction to seawater
  • Athletes feet – Caused by walking barefoot on damp surfaces without shoes in places such as communal showers, gyms, and wearing other peoples’ shoes

Many of these summer related conditions can be prevented by applying sunscreen with an SPF rating of 30 or higher, keeping the skin clean, wearing insect repellant, not wearing alcohol based perfumes, wearing protective clothing, wearing a hat, showering after being out in the sun and after swimming in seawater, and also avoiding being out and unprotected during the hottest times of the day. Following these tips can help prevent some of the summer skin problems that can occur.

If you would like to schedule an appointment with a physician at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-7001. If you are experiencing a severe reaction to any of the above conditions, seek medical care immediately.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Employee Spotlight Shines on Jonathan Benedek, LMSW

This month, we are proud to shine our Employee Spotlight on Jonathan Benedek, LMSW. Jonathan has been with Jamaica Hospital Medical Center for five years. He is a native of Queens and still resides in the borough. He attended elementary school at Yeshiva Tiferes Moshe in Kew Gardens, Mesivita Yesodei Yeshurun in Kew Gardens Hills for high school and Touro University where he obtained a BA in Psychology. He then received his Master’s Degree in Social Work from Touro Graduate School of Social Work.

Jonathan resides with his wife and they are expecting their first child in mid-July. In his free time he enjoys playing the piano/keyboard both for his own enjoyment and also to entertain at social events like birthday parties. He likes to cook with his wife and some of their favorite dishes to prepare are fish, pasta, chicken, and meat. Whenever he gets a chance, he enjoys a good bagel and also a nice slice of pizza. Jonathan also enjoys taking walks with his wife and engaging in religious studies.  Some of Jonathan’s favorite sports to watch and play are volleyball, tennis and soccer. He also enjoys hiking, camping, and zip lining.

Jonathan likes to travel and he has been to Florida, Rhode Island, Canada and Israel. In the future he hopes to visit places around the world that he has only visited virtually through Google Earth. Learning about other cultures is also very important to him.

Jonathan loves working at Jamaica Hospital because of his great co-workers and the diversity of the staff and the patients that they take care of. He enjoys being able to serve patients and assisting them with finding practical solutions to the challenges that they may be facing.  He feels that it is very important to treat people the way he would like to be treated.

We are very fortunate to have Jonathan as a member of our healthcare team at Jamaica Hospital and we hope that he remains with us for many more years.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Diseases That Affect The Retina

The retina is found on the inside back wall of the eye. It is a thin layer of tissue that contains millions of light sensitive cells called rods and cones. These cells gather visual information and transmit it to the brain through the optic nerve.

Disorders of the retina can affect vision and lead to vision loss. In certain cases loss of vision can be prevented if retinal diseases are detected and treated early.

Some common types of retinal diseases include:

  • Retinal tears – occur when the gel like substance in the center of the eye shrinks and causes tugging on the retina to the point where it tears. Symptoms include seeing floaters and flashes of light.
  • Retinal detachment – occurs when fluid passes through a tear in the retina and accumulates behind the retina causing it to separate from the back wall of the eye.
  • Diabetic retinopathy – occurs in people who have diabetes. It is the condition where the tiny blood vessels in the back of the eye leak fluid causing the retina to swell. This leads to blurry vision.
  • Macular degeneration – occurs when the center of the retina begins to deteriorate causing a blind spot in the center of the visual field. There are two types of macular degeneration, wet and dry.
  • Retinitis pigmentosa – is an inherited disease and causes loss of night vision and peripheral vision.

Some common symptoms of retinal diseases include:

  • Blurry vision
  • Loss of peripheral vision
  • Loss of night vision
  • Appearance of floaters

If you are experiencing any changes in your vision it is important to see an eye doctor as quickly as possible. Depending on what the diagnosis is, there are treatment options available that may be able to help correct the condition. If you would like to schedule an appointment with an eye doctor at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-5900.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

World No Tobacco Day

Since 1987 the World Health Organization has recognized May 31st as a day to bring awareness around the world of the harmful effects of tobacco.

The risks of using tobacco are well documented, however many people around the world are not fully aware of the dangers.  There is a very strong link between tobacco use and heart disease, circulatory problems, and stroke.

Coronary vascular diseases are one of the world’s leading causes of death.  Tobacco use is the second leading cause of these types of diseases, hypertension being the leading cause.

With all of the knowledge we have about the harmful effects of tobacco use, there are still some who have not received the message and as a result, more than 7 million people die each year from the effects of tobacco.

A few of the initiatives that the World Health Organization is trying to implement to inform people about tobacco’s harmful effects are:
• Increase public knowledge of the risks of smoking and secondhand smoke
• Encourage healthcare providers to speak to their patients about the hazards of tobacco
• Encourage governmental  support for educational programs
• Seek ways to promote smoke-free zones in buildings and public spaces
• Increase taxes on tobacco products
• Make it more difficult to purchase tobacco products
• Ban tobacco advertising

If you use tobacco products and would like to quit, speak to your provider. Jamaica Hospital offers a tobacco cessation program to help you. Please call 718-206-8494 to learn more.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Spring Cleaning – Naturally

Springtime means spring cleaning. If you’re looking for an alternative to store bought cleaners, check out these low-cost, non-toxic, environmentally friendly cleaning solutions for a fresh smelling home:

  • Baking Soda – cleans, softens water, and scours. You can also use baking soda to deodorize food storage containers and sprinkle on your carpet to absorb smells before vacuuming.
  • White Vinegar – cuts grease, removes mildew, odors, some stains and wax build-up. Use equal parts white vinegar and water to wash both the interior and exterior of your fridge.
  • Lemons  – effective against most household bacteria. Use lemon peels in your garbage disposal to help deodorize it.

You can also try these combinations:

  • All-Purpose Cleaner: Mix 1/2 cup vinegar and 1/4 cup baking soda into 1/2 gallon (2 liters) water. Store and keep. Use for removal of water deposit stains on shower stall panels, bathroom chrome fixtures, windows, and bathroom mirrors.
  • Mold and Mildew cleaner: Use white vinegar or lemon juice full strength. Apply with a sponge or scrubby.
  • Window Cleaner: Mix 2 teaspoons of white vinegar with 1 liter warm water. Use crumpled newspaper or cotton cloth to clean. Only use the black and white newspapers, not the colored ones. Don’t clean windows if the sun is on them, or if they are warm, or streaks will show on drying.
  • Furniture Polish: For varnished wood, add a few drops of lemon oil into a 1/2 cup warm water. Mix well and spray onto a soft, slightly damp, cotton cloth.  Wipe furniture with the cloth, and finish by wiping once more using a dry soft cotton cloth.

One more tip: Whenever you clean your home, save the floor or carpet for last. Clean window blinds and shelves first and then work downwards.  This allows time for the dust to settle before vacuuming.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.