Home Safety Tips for Do It Yourself Projects

Many people are spending more time at home these days which provides the perfect opportunity to get household projects done. The most important thing to know before undertaking do-it-yourself, home improvement projects is how to protect yourself from danger. You can do so by following these safety tips:

  • Keep a working fire extinguisher near to you.
  • Do not overload extension cords
  • Keep a first-aid kit near to where you are working
  • It is best to work in a well-lit environment
  • Avoid having debris on the floor
  • If you are painting, keep the area well ventilated
  • Keep power tools away from children
  • Never leave power tools unattended
  • Wear protective clothing when working with hazardous materials
  • Proper placement of a ladder is very important. For every four feet of ladder height, keep one foot away from wall
  • Do not stand on top of a ladder
  • Wear protective eye gear
  • Always follow instructions included with any materials that you will be working with

By following the above recommendations you are helping to avoid any injuries. It is important to keep emergency numbers and your phone on you in case something unexpected occurs.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

January is National Glaucoma Awareness Month

Glaucoma is a group of eye diseases that mainly affects people who are middle aged or older, but it can affect anyone at any age. There are more than three million people in the United States and 60 million people worldwide who suffer from glaucoma.

Glaucoma is the second leading cause of blindness. Typically the disease starts to develop suddenly, often without symptoms,  and once vision is lost, it is permanent. As much as 40 percent of vision can be lost before some people even notice a problem. It usually starts with loss of peripheral vision. Glaucoma  is caused by damage to the optic nerve so that the  brain isn’t able to receive images from the eyes. There are two types of Glaucoma, Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma where pressure inside the eye increases on its own and damages the optic nerve and Secondary Glaucoma where another disease causes the pressure in the eye to increase and that results in optic nerve damage. Both types will eventually lead to blindness.

Early detection of Glaucoma can help to slow down the progression of the disease. Regular eye exams are very important. To schedule an appointment with an eye doctor at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718- 206-5900.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Control Your Blood Pressure in the New Year

It is the beginning of the New Year and many of us will make resolutions to do things better than the previous year. For many people this means living healthy, losing weight, and keeping our blood pressure under control.

High blood pressure affects one in three Americans. If not controlled well it can lead to kidney problems, damaged blood vessels, stroke, and heart attacks. There are many factors that can cause blood pressure to be elevated including obesity, stress, smoking, high sodium diets and elevated cholesterol. Ideally, managing some of these factors can help to maintain a blood pressure that is as close to normal range (120/80mmHg) as possible.

There are many ways that doctors can help us to control our blood pressure, Your doctor can prescribe medication that will help. Additionally other methods include:

  • Quitting smoking
  • Lose weight
  • Stress reduction
  • Exercise regularly
  • Eat less salty food
  • Eliminate beverages that contain caffeine
  • Eat dark chocolate
  • Cut back on sugar
  • Drink less alcohol

Keeping your blood pressure under control is probably one of the most important things you can do to keep yourself healthy. Speak to your doctor about methods that would work best for you.

If you would like to schedule an appointment with a doctor at Jamaica Hospital to discuss how you can lower your blood pressure in 2018, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

The Employee Spotlight Shines on Nicholas DiMaria

We are proud to shine our employee spotlight on Nicholas DiMaria, Manager of the storeroom at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center. He joined the hospital 11 years ago as a storekeeper and is very appreciative of the opportunities given to be groomed for a leadership position. Nicholas is a native of Queens, New York. He grew up in Woodhaven where he still resides. He attended St. Elizabeth Elementary school, Arch Bishop Malloy High School, both in Queens and then moved on to Wake Technical College in Raleigh, North Carolina where he studied Criminal Justice.

In his free time he enjoys spending time with his wife and the rest of his family. His family is very important to him. He loves all types of food but pizza is definitely his favorite. Nicholas enjoys listening to different kinds of music which range from classical, to rap, rock, freestyle and country.  He likes to play video games and has a passion for football and hockey. One of his hobbies is collecting sneakers. He enjoys traveling and has visited several islands. His favorite destination is Walt Disney World in Orlando.

Nicholas has several pets. These include a 16 year old pit bull, a four year old Pomeranian, and three cats.

Nicholas has the utmost admiration for the hospital and also for the community that we serve. To him working with his colleagues is more than just a job, it is like an extended family. We are very thankful to have Nicholas as part of our team and we look forward to having him with us for a very long time.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Holiday Safety Tips

Christmas and New Years Eve are typically holidays where we gather with our family and friends to celebrate  but this year is unlike any other. In an effort to keep you safe, Jamaica Hospital Medical Center offers the following tips to modify your holiday celebration during the COVID-19 pandemic.

This year many health experts are recommending that we spend the holiday with only the people we live with year round and who are consistently taking precautions and are at the lowest risk. Once we open our home to people who don’t live with us, such as people traveling from other cities or states such as college students, we are increase the risk of spreading the virus. In addition, it is strongly recommended that gatherings be limited to ten people or less.

The Centers for Disease Control issued the following criteria for people who should not attend holiday gatherings. They include:

  • Anyone who has been diagnosed with COVID-19 recently
  • Anyone with symptoms of COVID-19
  • Anyone waiting for test results
  • Anyone who was exposed to someone else with COVID-19
  • Anyone who is immunocompromised

All guests should be asked to wear a mask and to maintain social distancing and avoid loud talking and singing. The number of people preparing and serving the meal should be limited to just a few. They should all be wearing masks and they should be washing their hands frequently. Other guests should also be encouraged to wash their hands as soon as they enter the home and limit contact with surfaces of furniture. It is also recommended that there be only one source of food preparation. This means food from other households should be avoided as best as possible.

This year the holiday will definitely have a different vibe than what we have been accustomed to in the past but if we all practice safety precautions, we can still enjoy festivities.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Frequently Asked Questions About The COVID-19 Vaccine

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) determines if a vaccine is appropriate based on the recommendations from the Advisory Committee on Immunizations and Practices (ACIP). The ACIP is a group of medical and public health experts that develop recommendations on how to use vaccines to control diseases in the United States.

Factors that the ACIP consider in their recommendations of vaccines include:

  • Safety and effectiveness
  • Severity of the disease
  • The number of people who get the disease if there is no vaccine
  • How effective is the vaccine for different age groups

The recent news about the availability of a COVID-19  vaccine has led to questions from many members of our community. Jamaica Hospital Medical Center is sharing the following information from the Centers for Disease Control  and Prevention (CDC) in an attempt to answer them.

Some commonly asked questions that people are asking:

Who will receive the vaccine first?

                At the present time, the first people to receive the vaccine will be frontline healthcare workers
                and elderly patients who are in extended care facilities such as nursing homes.

Is the vaccine safe?

The vaccines that are being distributed have undergone rigorous testing and have met the safety standards set forth by the CDC and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Are there any side effects of this vaccine?

The known side effects of the vaccines currently being distributed include soreness in the arm in which the vaccine was administered and some people have developed low grade fevers. Both of these only lasted less than 48 hours. There may be other side effects that we aren’t aware of yet.

Will the vaccine prevent me from getting COVID-19 ?

This vaccine, like all other vaccines, will lessen the chances of getting the virus but is not 100 percent guaranteed to be effective for everyone.

How long will the vaccine be effective for?

Until more time has passed and more people have been vaccinated, the CDC is not sure how long the vaccine will be effective for.

Do I need to wear a mask when I receive the vaccine?

Yes. Receiving the vaccine does not guarantee that you will not get the virus. Anytime you are outside of your immediate household and in contact with others, you should wear a mask that covers your nose and mouth.

Will I still have to follow safety protocols even though I have received the vaccine?

Yes. The vaccine is only one component of the safety measures that will still have to be followed.

How many times will I have to be vaccinated?

At the present time, it will be necessary to receive two doses of the vaccine and you will be given a date when you receive the first dose and when to come back for the second one.

If I already had the virus, should I still get the vaccine?

At the present time the CDC feels there isn’t enough information available to answer this question.

What should I do if I have a reaction to the vaccine?

You should contact your health care provider immediately as well as to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS).

The first doses were delivered around the United States on Monday December 14th. Once mass distribution begins the answers to the frequently asked questions will be answered more accurately. This is the link to the CDC for further information and to answer more questions about the vaccine. https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/faq.html

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

The Health Benefits of Turmeric

Turmeric is a bright yellow spice that has been used for centuries in Asia, and today is promoted around the world as a dietary supplement. It is believed to have medicinal capabilities due to a powerful ingredient -curcumin- that has anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties.

Turmeric is also believed to have other properties which include:

  • Anti-proliferative
  • Anti-microbial
  • Neuroprotective
  • Cardioprotective
  • Wound healing

However, they have not been studied, and much research is needed to confirm their effects.

Turmeric is taken orally, usually mixed in with cooking oils or ingested as a spice. It is considered to be generally very safe; however, some people have experienced nausea and occasionally diarrhea from taking it. It is also important to note that turmeric can be harmful to pregnant women, and can interact with certain medications such as aspirin or ibuprofen, affecting how they work. Before adding turmeric to your diet, it is highly advised that you speak with a physician.

At Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Post-COVID Care Center, health practitioners may incorporate a diet that focuses on reducing inflammation as part of a patient’s integrative health treatment plan. The anti-inflammatory diet involves the elimination of foods and beverages high in fat and increasing the consumption of vegetables and lean proteins, such as fish. Another aspect of this diet is adding turmeric (as recommended by an integrative health physician) which can help address joint stiffness and muscle pain, both common symptoms reported by patients experiencing the long-term COVID-19 symptoms.

Jamaica Hospital has opened up a Post COVID-19 Care Center focusing on treating people who have been experiencing long term side effects of the virus. These people are known as “Long Haulers” and may experience depression, lethargy, anxiety, inflammation, loss of hair, loss of taste, shortness of breath, muscle and body pain. The staff at the center takes a holistic, whole approach to treating these patients. This includes not only treating with medications when deemed necessary but also with exercise, yoga, mind-body exercises, and nutritional support.

If you or someone you know is experiencing long term effects of COVID-19 and would like to schedule an appointment at Jamaica Hospital’s Post COVID Center, please call 718-736-8204.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Holiday Decorating Safety Tips

Decorating your home for the holidays is always so much fun, but did you know that each year an estimated 250 house fires nationwide are caused by faulty holiday lights? Here are some tips for keeping your home safe this year:

• Before stringing holiday lights always check the sockets to ensure they are not broken or cracked.

• Never use indoor lights for outdoors use.

• Turn off the indoor tree lights before going to bed or whenever you leave the house.

• Do not connect more than three sets of lights to each extension cord.

• Make sure that your lights have safety labels and are made by reputable companies.

• Do not use candles on or near a tree.

• Place your tree and gift-wrapped presents away from sources of heat such as fireplaces.

• Make sure that your tree is secured firmly to its base so that it can’t tip over.

• Artificial trees should be fire resistant.

• Always keep a fire extinguisher handy and accessible in case of emergency.

Benny Quiles, Director of Safety

Benny Quiles, Director of Safety at Jamaica Hospital says “a small Christmas tree fire can spread and grow large very quickly. Use flame-retardant decorations. make sure your smoke detectors have working batteries and never block fire exits.”

Don’t ruin your holiday by being careless. A little common sense and taking some precautions will ensure a joyous holiday for you and your family.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Thanksgiving COVID-19 Tips

Thanksgiving is typically a holiday where we gather with our family and friends but this year is unlike any other. In an effort to keep you safe, Jamaica Hospital Medical Center offers the following tips to modify your holiday celebration during the COVID-19 pandemic.

This year many health experts are recommending that we spend the holiday with only the people we live with year round and who are consistently taking precautions and are at the lowest risk. Once we open our home to people who don’t live with us, such as people traveling from other cities or states such as college students, we are increase the risk of spreading the virus. In addition, it is strongly recommended that gatherings be limited to ten people or less.

The Centers for Disease Control issued the following criteria for people who should not attend holiday gatherings. They include:

  • Anyone who has been diagnosed with COVID-19 recently
  • Anyone with symptoms of COVID-19
  • Anyone waiting for test results
  • Anyone who was exposed to someone else with COVID-19
  • Anyone who is immunocompromised

All guests should be asked to wear a mask and to maintain social distancing and avoid loud talking and singing. The number of people preparing and serving the meal should be limited to just a few. They should all be wearing masks and they should be washing their hands frequently. Other guests should also be encouraged to wash their hands as soon as they enter the home and limit contact with surfaces of furniture. It is also recommended that there be only one source of food preparation. This means food from other households should be avoided as best as possible.

This year the holiday will definitely have a different vibe than what we have been accustomed to in the past but if we all practice safety precautions, we can still enjoy festivities.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

How Long Should A Mother Breastfeed ?

The World Health Organization (WHO) and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommend exclusive breastfeeding during the first six months after a baby is born.  However, breastfeeding should continue at least for the first year.

Breastfeeding has long been known to offer benefits to babies and mothers.

Benefits for the babies:

  • Developing a stronger immune system
  • Obtaining a well-balanced diet

Benefits to mothers who breastfeed for a year include a:

  • Lower risk of breast cancer
  • Lower risk of ovarian cancer
  • Lower risk of high blood pressure
  • Lower risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis
  • Lower risk of developing diabetes

Weaning a baby off breastfeeding usually begins when other types of food are introduced into the diet. The WHO and AAP recommend that this occur at the six month mark. A baby who is starting to eat solid food may not require as much breastmilk for nutrition. It is best to slowly wean a baby off of breastmilk instead of stopping suddenly.

There is no evidence to indicate that long term breastfeeding can be harmful to a baby’s or mother’s health.

Ultimately the decision for how long to breastfeed will be up to the mom and her baby. Speak to your baby’s pediatrician for their guidance on the recommendations. If you would like to schedule an appointment with a pediatrician at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.