Why Is My Vision Blurry ?

Many of us have experienced blurry vision at one time or another. Our vision may have been blurred in both eyes or in one eye only. In some cases, our inability to see clearly was sudden and temporary because the problem resolved on its own. In other instances, blurred vision may have developed and worsened over a period of time.

Despite the circumstance, changes to our vision should not be ignored as it is often an indication of a health issue.

Sudden and temporary blurred vision may be caused by digital eye strain, dry eyes, certain medications, conjunctivitis or fatigue. Blurry vision that occurs suddenly can also serve as a warning sign for serious health conditions that require immediate medical attention such as a detached retina, stroke, optic neuritis (inflammation of the optic nerve) or transient ischemic attack.

When blurry vision gets worse over time, it is usually caused by a chronic medical condition, such as glaucoma, diabetes or macular degeneration.

Treatment for blurry vision is dependent on the cause. Any condition that leads to blurry vision should be evaluated by a medical professional as soon as possible. While some of these conditions may resolve on their own, other situations may become worse and lead to blindness.

To schedule an appointment with an eye doctor at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-5900 or go to an emergency room if it is urgent.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

This Month We Shine Our Spotlight on Ray Fredericks, Jr.

This month we are proud to shine our Employee Spotlight on Ray Fredericks, Jr.  Ray has been with the hospital for close to thirty years. He is a familiar sight on both campuses as well as our facility in Melville.

Ray grew up in Bethpage Long Island. He graduated from Plainedge High School and then went on to BOCES Tech where he obtained his degree in Printing in 1986. He currently lives in Orange County New York.

One of the most important aspects of Ray’s life is spending time with his very close knit family. He has a fourteen year old son who he enjoys spending time with and they share many of the same interests. They often have air hockey tournaments at home and Ray enjoys watching his son participate in Pokemon competitions. To Ray, family is everything. His family spends a great deal of time together and of course,  enjoys celebrating holidays and other special events with one another. They have also traveled together as a family.

Ray loves the outdoors and enjoys partaking in all kinds of outdoor activities, especially hiking and fishing. He enjoys playing  the drums, and dancing. Ray’s other interests include reading, (especially about history), and going to the movies. He is an avid photographer also.

Ray is very proud to be a part of the Jamaica Hospital family. In fact, three generations of his family work either at the hospital or the MediSys Network. He enjoys the comraderie and the sense of belonging to a wonderful organization that does great things for our patients.  We are very proud to have Ray working with us and we look forward to him being a part of the Jamaica Hospital Medical Center and MediSys Network for many more years to come.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Do People Really Sleepwalk?

We have seen people who sleep walk in movies but how many of us have actually seen it in person? Probably not many of us have. Sleepwalking, or as it is known in medical terms, somnambulism, actually does exist. It is more common in children, but adults can experience it as well.

Most people won’t remember when they were sleepwalking. This is because sleep walking typically occurs during a deep stage of sleep.

A few of the causes of sleep walking are:

  • Stress
  • Fever
  • Change in sleep schedule
  • Lack of sleep
  • Substance abuse
  • Taking certain medications
  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease

Medical conditions that can lead to sleepwalking are:

  • Nighttime seizures
  • Migraines
  • Heartburn
  • Heart rhythm problems
  • Restless leg syndrome

Diagnosing sleepwalking starts with doing a physical exam which may be accompanied by a sleep study in a specialized lab. Sensors will monitor breathing patterns oxygen levels, brain waves, eye and leg movement.

Treating sleepwalking is based upon the cause and may include antidepressants, as well as adjusting prescribed medications that the patient is taking already. People who sleep walk should avoid drinking alcohol, be in a stress free environment and  get a good night’s sleep.

If someone you know tends to walk in their sleep it is a common misconception that they shouldn’t be awakened. It is important to make their environment safe so that they don’t hurt themselves and doors and windows should be locked.

If someone you know tends to walk in their sleep it is important to make the environment safe so that they don’t hurt themselves. They should also be as stress free as possible, have a relaxing routine prior to going to sleep, and they should not drink alcohol.

To schedule an appointment with a sleep disorder specialist at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

This Month We Shine Our Employee Spotlight On Nicole Tuccillo, PA-C, MHA

This month, we are proud to shine our employee spotlight on Nicole Tuccillo, PA-C, MHA a Physician Assistant in the Emergency Department at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center where she has been working since 1999.

Nicole is a native of Queens. She grew up in Howard Beach and attended elementary school at P.S. 207, Junior High School at J.H.S. 202, and high school at Christ the King. She received her associate’s degree from Delhi University and received her B.S. and Physician Assistant degrees from Wagner College. Nicole then went on to obtain a Master’s in Health Administration from Bellevue University in 2012.

Nicole spent her first four years working at Jamaica Hospital in the PICU, she later began working in the Emergency Department. One of the positions she held was Trauma Program manager for five years. However, Nicole’s true calling is working in the different areas of the Emergency Department as this is where she feels she is most needed. She has the opportunity in the ER to teach PA and medical students which is very rewarding.

Nicole currently lives with her family on Long Island. Nicole’s husband is a Lieutenant with the New York City Fire Department. They have a son who is 14 years old and a daughter who is 13 years old. Completing the household is a dog named Cocoa who is always at the door waiting to greet them with lots of love. Her family is her whole world. Nicole also enjoys spending time with her friends as well and likes the fact that they round out her life so nicely. In her free time she practices Pilates and yoga which help her to relax and stay grounded.

Nicole likes trying new types of food, especially things that are exotic. She also loves to travel to new places. A few of the places she has been to include Iceland, Hawaii, Montreal, Sicily and other parts of Europe. Travelling the world has given her the opportunity to see new places, see the beauty that they hold, and learn about other cultures.

Nicole enjoys working at Jamaica Hospital because it is a comfortable atmosphere in which she is able to multi-task. According to Nicole, “The hospital is a place where everyone knows everyone else and work well together as a team. Our collective goal is to provide our patients with the utmost of care.” She also enjoys the diversity that is part of the fabric of the hospital and the patients that we treat.

We are very happy to have Nicole as part of the Jamaica Hospital Medical Center family and look forward to having her with us for many more years.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Why is it important to know what Cushing syndrome is?

When the body is exposed to high levels of the stress  hormone cortisol for extended periods of time this leads to a condition known as hypercortisolism, or Cushing syndrome.

High levels of cortisol in the body can occur as a result of ingesting oral corticosteroids or the body producing too much of the hormone in the adrenal glands.

Why would the body produce too much cortisol? It may be due to a tumor on the pituitary gland which leads to an over production of  adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) that stimulates the adrenal glands. This is more common in women than in men.  It can also be due to a noncancerous tumor of the adrenal gland which causes an excess production of cortisol.

The medications that contain steroids are used to treat asthma, inflammation, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus. patients who have had organ transplants are also given steroids to reduce the risk of complications.

Signs and symptoms of Cushing syndrome include:

  • Weight gain
  • Buffalo hump ( fatty tissue deposits between the shoulders)
  • Moon face ( fatty tissue deposits in the face)
  • Thinning of the skin
  • Slow healing of wounds
  • Severe fatigue
  • Depression
  • Headache
  • Bone loss
  • Weakness
  • Acne
  • High blood sugar levels

Diagnosing Cushing syndrome is done by several methods. A 24 hour urine test may be performed to test levels of cortisol, a dexamethasone suppression test which involves taking a low dose steroid pill at night and then checking the blood levels for it in the morning, and a salivary cortisol level test which measures the level of cortisol in the saliva at night.

Treatment depends on the cause of the condition. If a person is taking in too much cortisol, it may have to be reduced. If a person is producing too much cortisol, ruling out a tumor is important. It is possible to cure Cushing syndrome, and if a complete cure isn’t possible, there are ways to at least control it. If you would like to schedule an appointment with a physician at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Is Having An Annual Physical Exam Important ?

It’s the beginning of a new year which is a perfect time to make a promise to take better care of yourself.  What better way to do this than by scheduling an appointment for a regular medical check-up. Even if you feel fine, it is a good idea to see your medical doctor to ensure that you don’t have any underlying health issues. The American Medical Association is now recommending that physical exams be performed once every five years for people between 18 and 40 years of age and every three years after the age of 40, as long as there are no chronic illnesses that require  more frequent check-ups.  After the age of 55, an annual exam is probably a good idea.

There are many reasons that having a physical exam is something that everyone should make time to do.  These include:

  • Prevention of illnesses
  • Monitoring the risk of chronic disease
  • Identify illnesses that don’t have symptoms
  • Monitoring your weight, blood pressure, heart rate, and basic body chemistry
  • Adjusting your lifestyle to best suit your rage
  • Keeping an ongoing relationship with your physician

If you would like to schedule an appointment with a physician at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Holiday Safe Driving Tips

Tsafe driving -481749758he holiday season is upon us and that means many people will be hitting the road to visit family and friends, taking shopping trips to the mall, or just celebrating the joyous season.

During the holidays schools are usually closed for vacation, many people get time off from work and everyone wants to have a good time.

By taking a few precautions you can get to your destination safely and have a wonderful time. Safe driving is a key component of having a happy holiday season. To make sure that everything goes well, here are some safety tips to follow:
• Do not speed
• Do not text while driving
• Do not drink and drive
• Plan your route in advance
• Make sure your car is operating properly – check fluids, brakes and lights
• Make sure that you are well rested before getting behind the wheel
• Make sure that everyone in the vehicle is buckled up

Following these safe driving tips will make sure your holiday will be a lot merrier.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Shining Our Employee Spotlight on Dominic Rodrigues

This month we shine our Employee Spotlight on Dominic Rodrigues, Registration Supervisor in the Emergency Department.

Dominic was born in Bangladesh and came to New York when he was three years old. He grew up in Queens Village and attended P.S. 82, Junior High School 109 and August Martin High School. Dominic is a graduate of Queensborough Community College with a degree in Business Management.

Dominic began his career in 2002 at Jamaica Hospital as a registrar, then became a financial investigator. He was later promoted to his current position as a supervisor.

Dominic still resides in Queens Village with his wife Annmarie and their 8-year- old son Andrew. He enjoys spending his free time with family and friends. One of Dominic’s favorite things to do is to go fishing, primarily in the Spring and Summer but he has also gone occasionally in the winter months. When he is home he enjoys building things with his son. They have built model airplanes and they also put together puzzles of maps.

Dominic likes taking trips and likes picking new places to explore. A few years ago he took his family to Australia and describes it as one of the best vacations he has ever taken.

Dominic enjoys working at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center because he feels like he is a part of a really wonderful group of people. He enjoys helping people, both his fellow employees and the patients that come to us from all over. He looks forward to continuing to contribute to the hospital’s growth and success.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

How Do You Know If It’s A Panic Attack Or A Heart Attack ?

You are experiencing pain in your chest and shortness of breath. Are you having a heart attack or are you experiencing a panic attack? Both conditions share very similar symptoms and have a sudden on-set, so how can you tell them apart?

Typical symptoms of a heart a heart include chest pain, shortness of breath, radiating pain, sweating, nausea, and vomiting. During a heart attack it feels as if pressure or a squeezing sensation on the chest and it typically doesn’t improve over time. Heart attacks are usually brought on by exertion.

During a panic attack you may also experience shortness but it is usually accompanied by tingling of the hands, shaking, and a rapid heartbeat. Instead of a squeezing sensation, a panic attack often produces a sharp, stabbing pain in the chest. Pain experienced during a panic attack usually improves within 30 minutes. Panic attacks are usually due to stress.

Determining the difference between the two can be difficult but don’t take any chances if you are uncertain. If you are experiencing chest pain for more than three minutes you should seek help by calling 911. It is always best to have trained medical professionals examine you in order to be safe. An electrocardiogram and a blood test will be performed to confirm or rule out a heart attack.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Employee Spotlight on Frank Filloramo

This month we shine our Employee Spotlight on Frank Filloramo, Paramedic.

Frank Filloramo is a very familiar face to many people as he has worked in the Pre-Hospital Care Department at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center for over 30 years. Frank grew up in Howard Beach, New York and went to elementary school at St. Helen’s, then on to Christ the King for High School, and attended St. John’s University.

While working at Jamaica Hospital, Frank worked for the New York City Police Department as a Sergeant in the Counterterrorism Division. He retired from that position in 2010 after having served for twenty years. He also worked part time for two years as a paramedic for the New York Mets at Citifield. He says it was a great experience and he met some very interesting players. In 2017, Frank was one of the employees who went to Puerto Rico as part of Jamaica Hospital’s Hurricane Maria relief effort to the island.

Frank currently lives in Connecticut and has three beautiful daughters, ages 16, 13, and 10 years old. They mean the world to him. In his free time he enjoys cooking with his girls, especially making home-made pizza. Frank says that family is the most important part of his life. This is why holidays that involve family gatherings such as Christmas are special to him. While his immediate family is his number one priority, he values his family at Jamaica Hospital as well.

Frank enjoys working at Jamaica Hospital. He says that it is like a second home. The hospital allows Frank to live his dream of helping others and sharing his knowledge with colleagues. Jamaica Hospital is fortunate to have Frank as part of our team at and we look forward to him remaining with us for many more years.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.