A Covid-19 Vaccine Myth

There are many myths being spread about the COVID-19 vaccines and this is causing some people to be hesitant about getting it. The vaccines currently being administered within the United States have been proven to be safe.

One myth is that the vaccines are made with egg-based products and people who are allergic to eggs may have a reaction. It should be clear that neither the Pfizer/BioNTech nor the Moderna COVID vaccines are made with egg-based products.

Even though these vaccines are not made with egg-based products, those who have a history of allergic reactions to vaccines should still mention this before receiving the vaccine. All patients, regardless of their history of allergic reactions should be monitored for 30 minutes after receiving the vaccine.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Irritable Bowel Syndrome Awareness Month

April is Irritable Bowel Syndrome Awareness Month (IBS). This is a condition that affects the large intestine resulting in the following symptoms:

  • Bloating
  • Gas
  • Nausea
  • Abdominal cramps
  • Diarrhea or constipation

There is no general rule of what to eat and what to avoid in treating IBS. A physician will go through a patient’s daily diet and see if there are certain foods that are more likely to act as triggers. The foods that physicians who treat this disease may recommend avoiding include:

  • Wheat
  • Carbonated Drinks
  • Dairy products
  • Beans
  • Cabbage

Some of these symptoms can be relieved by modifying the diet as well as taking certain medications.

The classifications of medications include:

Antibiotics

Anti-diarrheal agents

Anti-spasmodics

Prescription laxatives

Prescription pain medications

If you are experiencing recurring intestinal distress and would like to speak with a physician at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Employee Spotlight Shines on Devika Nanan

This month we are proud to shine our Employee Spotlight on Devika Nanan. a Medical Assistant (PAR) in our Ambulatory Care Department. Devika came to Jamaica Hospital Medical Center five years ago, first as a volunteer for 18 months and in her current position thereafter.

Devika is a native of the Caribbean twin isles of Trinidad and Tobago where she grew up and attended school. After successfully completing seven years at the elementary level she then continued on to secondary school. While in high school she was exposed to a wide variety of disciplines but ultimately decided to focus her attention on Business Principles, Management and Spanish. Before coming to the United States she also attended the Lakshimi Girls Hindu College.

After completing her studies, she soon became a mother. Wanting to provide her children with a better way of life, she emigrated to New York and settled in Queens where she currently resides. She worked hard and was determined to continue her education.  Devika enrolled at Garden State Technical College in New Jersey where she trained as a Medical Assistant.

Devika wears many hats. She is a wife, mother of three and grandmother of two. She enjoys spending time with her family which is very important to her. In her free time she enjoys reading, and listening to music. Her favorite types of food are West Indian and Hibachi. When she goes on vacation, she likes to visit different beaches and take her children to historical places.

Devika enjoys working with her colleagues at Jamaica Hospital. She also enjoys her interactions with our patients, as this allows her friendly personality to shine. We are very fortunate to have Devika as a member of our team and look forward to many more years as one of our valued employees.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

National Poison Prevention Week

The National Poison Prevention Week was established by the U.S. Congress  in 1961 to bring public attention to the dangers of poisoning and how to prevent it.

Each year, more than 2 million poisonings are reported to the nation’s poison control centers. The American Association of Poison Control Centers reports that 93 percent of poisonings occur in the home, 45 percent involve children under the age of six and the majority of fatal poisonings occur in older adults.

There are several ways that some poisonings can be prevented. These include keeping all chemicals out of reach from children, reading dosages and labels on all medications, and knowing how certain medications react when taken together. Here are a few basic steps to take if a poisoning takes place:

For inhaled poison get the person fresh air immediately

For skin poison take off the person’s clothes and rinse skin with fresh water for 15 – 20 minutes

For poison in the eyes, rinse the eyes out with fresh water for 15 – 20 minutes

For an overdose of medicine, call 9-1-1  immediately

In all cases of poisoning, contact the local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. Treatment advice will depend on the type of poison, the person’s age, and medical history.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

World Kidney Day

Today is recognized as World Kidney Day. This year the slogan is “Living Well with Kidney Disease” because the aim is to educate people who are affected to manage it successfully.

The kidneys are two, fist-sized organs in your lower back. They maintain overall health by serving following functions:

  • Filtering waste out of 200 liters of blood each day
  • Regulating of the body’s salt, potassium and acid content
  • Removing toxins from the body.
  • Balancing the body’s fluids
  • Releasing hormones that regulate blood pressure
  • Producing an active form of vitamin D that promotes strong, healthy bones
  • Controlling the production of red blood cells

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease and Control, some quick facts on Kidney Disease are:

  • Kidney disease is the 9th leading cause of death in the country.
  • More than 26 million Americans have kidney disease, and most don’t know it.
  • There are over 95,000 people waiting for kidney transplants.
  • Currently, more than 590,000 people have kidney failure in the U.S. today.

Often times, kidney failure can be prevented or delayed through early detection and proper treatment of underlying disease such as diabetes and high blood pressure which can slow additional damage to the kidneys.

If you are 18 years or older with diabetes, high blood pressure, cardiovascular disease or a family history of kidney disease, you should schedule an appointment with your doctor and ask that you be screened for kidney disease.

If you would like to make an appointment to have your Kidney’s checked, you can schedule an appointment at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center by calling 718-206-7001 for an appointment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

COVID-19 Myth or Fact

A very common myth is that Covid-19 affects older people more severely than younger people. The fact is that while older people tend to have more risk factors, people of any age can and do get the virus. A younger person may have a more robust immune system but it will not prevent them from getting the virus. Younger people can be affected just as severely as an older adult.

If you would like to schedule an appointment with a physician at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, you may do so by calling 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Employee Spotlight Shines on Karen Codd

This month, we are proud to shine our Employee Spotlight on Karen Codd, Community Wellness Coordinator in the Department of Psychiatry.

Karen has been working at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center since 2015, first as a creative arts therapy extern and then for the past four years and eight months as a full-time creative arts therapist.

Karen is a native of Somerville, New Jersey, where she attended elementary through high school. She then graduated from The College of St. Rose where she obtained her Bachelor of Fine Arts, majoring in Sculpture and minoring in Art History and Photography. She later received a Master of Professional Studies degree in Art Therapy and Creativity Development from the Pratt Institute and is now part of their Graduate Art Therapy faculty. Karen is currently working towards a Doctorate of Art Therapy from Mount Mary University.

Karen has been living in Brooklyn for almost 16 years and shares her home with two cats, Vicky and Trish. In her free time, she enjoys watching movies, playing music, visiting museums and spending time with friends. Travelling the world is also one of her passions; her favorite places visited so far are Chile, Turkey, and India. She likes eating a variety of cuisines from different parts of the globe; however, Asian dishes are her favorite.

According to Karen, being of service to others is her true calling. She is grateful to have the support of her department’s administration which allows her to pursue her passions and research interests. Working at Jamaica Hospital has allowed her to utilize her knowledge of the arts and its therapeutic benefits to help mental health patients during some of the most difficult times in their lives.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Should You Get a Flu Vaccine During the Pandemic?

Many people have asked whether or not they should get the flu shot during this year’s pandemic. According to medical experts, the answer is yes. There are a few very good reasons why getting a flu shot is the correct approach to protecting yourself. These include:

Getting influenza can weaken the body’s defenses and make it more susceptible to other illnesses, including Covid-19.

Since many of the symptoms of influenza and Covid-19 are similar, helping the body to fight off influenza can potentially make Covid-19 less severe.

Wearing a mask and social distancing have the potential to lessen our risk of contracting influenza as well as Covid-19, however these measures aren’t foolproof. A vaccine that will help lower the risk of getting seriously ill offers an added layer of protection..

Getting a flu vaccine during the pandemic may also help to prevent the spread of influenza to others.

It is possible to have the flu and Covid-19 at the same time; however, getting vaccinated can help lessen the severity of certain complications.

If you have any questions about getting one or both of these vaccines, consult with your physician to see if it is appropriate in your individual case. To schedule an appointment with a physician at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-7001

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

COVID-19 Vaccine Fact Versus Myth

There are many myths being circulated about the COVID-19 vaccine due to a spread of misinformation. It is important to know what is true and what is not to help you make an informed decision about getting vaccinated.

Is it true that the vaccine was produced too quickly and is unsafe because it wasn’t tested sufficiently?

The vaccines have all been tested by the Food and Drug Administration and have been deemed to be safe.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

This Month We Shine Our Employee Spotlight on Navindra Santram, E.M.T.

This month we are proud to shine our Employee Spotlight on Navindra “Navie” Santram an Emergency Medical Technician in our Pre-Hospital Care Department.

Navindra, or as he likes to be called Navie is a native of Guyana who came to the United States when he was 6 years old. He has lived in Richmond Hill and Ozone Park, attended PS 226, is a 1992 graduate of Hillcrest High School and attended LaGuardia College. He continues to live in Queens with his wife and two sons who are 11 and 12 years of age.  Also living in his home are his 2 ½ year old puppy and an assortment of tropical fish. Family is very important to Navie and he enjoys spending his free time with them whether it be playing sports, board games, or traveling to new destinations. Whenever he and his family go on vacation to places they have never been, they like to learn as much as possible about the area they are visiting. This includes the history, the culture, and the food people eat there. Another one of his favorite activities is camping. He likes being outdoors and enjoying nature.

Navie enjoys many types of food, especially Caribbean, and Italian. He has a deep knowledge of all genres of music particularly music from the Golden ’60s. He and his family enjoy watching action movies together. He also enjoys planting vegetables in his garden and watching them grow.

Working at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center for the past 14 ½ years has given Navie the opportunity to pursue his passion for helping others, especially those who find themselves in need of medical attention. He greatly appreciates all the opportunities he has been given to grow professionally and he feels fortunate to be working with people who are passionate about the work that they do for people in the community. In 2017 Jamaica Hospital sent a team of medical professionals to Puerto Rico to help in the Hurricane Maria Relief effort and Navindra feels fortunate to have been selected to be a part of this medical mission. Helping people whose lives were devastated was a very rewarding experience, and one that he will never forget.

We are fortunate to have Navie working for us and we look forward to having him as a member of our team for many more years to come.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.