Everything You Need to Know About the Different Types of Sugar

Sugar is a type of carbohydrate that is composed of molecules of carbon, hydrogen and oxygen. When carbohydrates are broken down through digestion they become a source of energy for the body..

There are two types of carbohydrates, known as either simple carbohydrates or complex carbohydrates. Simple carbohydrates are made of either one molecule of sugar or two molecules of sugar. Complex carbohydrates are made up of three or more sugar molecules.

The simplest type of sugar is called a monosaccharide or simple sugar. Examples of this type of sugar are:

Glucose – comes from plants and the body uses it for energy.
Fructose – comes from honey, fruits and some root vegetables and can only be broken down by the liver.
Galactose – mainly found in peas and is structurally a variant of glucose.

Another type of simple sugar is a disaccharide which are formed when two monosaccharides are joined together. Examples of this type of sugar are:

Sucrose – comes from the combination of glucose and fructose and is found in sugar beets, often called           table sugar.
Lactose – found in dairy products and is a combination of glucose and galactose.
Maltose – is composed of two molecules of glucose and found in some grains.

Some sugars are found in food naturally while other sugars are added to food when they are processed to add color and flavor. Regardless of sugar’s source, the body will metabolize it the same way. Sugar that is found naturally in fruit usually is in small enough quantities that it isn’t harmful. Added sugars are processed and do not provide any benefits to our health.

Consuming too much sugar can have detrimental effects on the body. This includes obesity, dental cavities, and diabetes. It is important to limit the amount of any type of sugar that is consumed on a daily basis in order to avoid these negative effects.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Employee Spotlight Shines on Mukid Khan

This month, we are proud to shine our Employee Spotlight on Mukid Khan, Epic Systems Analyst  and Registered Respiratory Therapist . Today is a little more special for this recognition because it is also Mukid’s birthday.

Mukid has been with Jamaica Hospital Medical Center for 10 years. He began his career with us as a Registered Respiratory Therapist;  he still continues to fill this role on a per diem basis. His full time position now is as an Epic Systems Analyst.

Mukid grew up in Queens. He lived in Astoria until the age of 16 then moved to Jamaica. He now resides in Forest Hills. He attended P.S. 85 in Astoria, Middle College High School in Long Island City and went on to get his B.S. in Respiratory Care at SUNY Stony Brook. A few years later, Mukid went on to graduate school at SUNY Downstate Health Sciences University where he obtained his M.S. in Medical Informatics.

In his free time, he enjoys listening to thought-provoking podcasts, watching indie films with ambiguous endings, experiencing art shows, and live musical events. Mukid likes to travel to new places. The most memorable places he has visited are the temples and shrines of Kyoto, Japan and the Corn Islands of Nicaragua. He enjoys eating various types of food, his favorites being Nicaraguense, Bangladeshi, and Japanese.  Mukid likes music that is melodic especially house and rock. His hobbies include photography, hiking, gaming, experimenting with new recipes, and also mixing music. His favorite annual holiday-time movie is the Lord of Rings Trilogy.

The priorities in his life are his wife and best friend Cristina, family, friends and his cat Kuma.  Also important to him are the pursuit of knowledge, understanding and justice.

We look forward to Mukid continuing to work with us for many more years.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Tips for Keeping Your New Year’s Resolution

Many people feel that the beginning of the New Year is the perfect time to get a “fresh start” on goals they would like to accomplish. While we may start off with good intentions, many people don’t follow through on their resolutions for more than a week or two. It may take time for a new habit or goal to become part of a daily routine, and those wanting immediate results may lose patience.

Here are some helpful suggestions for keeping your New Year’s resolutions this year:

  • Set goals that are realistic
  • Plan your goals in advance
  • Write down a plan on how you will achieve your goals
  • Tell others who you can trust to help you with your plan
  • Give yourself a reward when you reach certain levels of these goals
  • Keep track of your progress by writing it down
  • Don’t give up if the first attempt fails, try again.

Be patient with yourself. Changing a habit or starting a new routine can take time to get used to. If you don’t succeed with the first attempt, think about what went wrong and try to modify that behavior. You can always try again.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

A Healthy Holiday Eggplant Ricotta Bites Recipe

It is the holiday season, a time of year when people tend to do eat special treats. Whether you are having company at your home or will be visiting others in theirs, this recipe from the Food Network for eggplant ricotta bites  will definitely put a smile on people’s faces.

https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/food-network-kitchen/eggplant-ricotta-bites-recipe-1973666

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

What is a Blood Clot ?

A blood clot is the body’s way of preventing excess bleeding when a blood vessel is damaged. Clots are made up of cells in the blood called platelets combined with proteins found in the plasma. However, under normal circumstances the clot will dissolve naturally after the blood vessel heals. A blood clot can become dangerous when it forms without an injury to a blood vessel, and if it fails to dissolve naturally.

Blood clots can form in either the arteries or veins. When they form in veins, blood flow back to the heart is restricted. This can cause swelling and pain in the area where the clot has formed. When a blood clot forms in an artery, it will deprive vital organs of oxygen needed to function properly. In some cases this can lead to a heart attack or a stroke.

Risk factors for developing a clot include:

  • Smoking
  • Taking oral contraceptives
  • Trauma
  • Obesity
  • Diabetes
  • High blood pressure
  • Prolonged inactivity
  • Pregnancy
  • Family history
  • History of cancer
  • Age 65 or older
  • Bone fracture

The symptoms of a blood clot vary depending on the part of the body that is affected. Symptoms can include weakness in arms, legs, face, dizziness, shortness of breath, sharp chest pain, sweating, nausea, blurry vison and coughing up blood.

Treatment of a blood clot is dependent on where the clot is located. Some clots can be treated with blood thinners while others may require surgical intervention.

If you are experiencing any of the signs and symptoms of a blood clot, it is important that you seek immediate medical attention. You should call your physician or call 9-1-1 and go to the nearest emergency room to be evaluated.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

The Great American Smokeout

Today is the Great American Smokeout, an annual event when the American Cancer Society encourages everyone to quit smoking. This event helps to make people aware of the dangers of using tobacco products as well as the tools that are available to help them quit smoking.

The Great American Smokeout started in 1970 in a small town in Massachusetts. People were asked to give up smoking for one day and to take the money that they would have spent on cigarettes and donate it to a local high school scholarship fund. The event spread to other cities both large and small and eventually led to legislation that bans smoking in workplaces, restaurants, and other public spaces both indoors and outdoors.

Smoking  is responsible for one in five deaths in the United States today. Lung cancer is the leading cause of death in both men and women. Smoking is also the cause of cancer of the larynx, mouth, sinuses, throat, esophagus, and the bladder. The number of people who smoke has dramatically decreased in the United States since the anti-smoking campaigns began. In 1965 it was estimated that over 40 percent of the population were smokers and today that number is around 18 percent.

Smokers have the best chances of quitting if they use at least two of the following methods:

  • Smoking Cessation Groups
    • Nicotine substitute products
    • Support from family and friends
    • Telephone quit lines
    • Counseling
    • Prescription medications that help to reduce the urge to smoke

If you would like more information about quitting smoking please call the American Cancer Society at 1-800-227-2345. If you would like to schedule an appointment with a doctor at Jamaica Hospital to discuss smoking cessation, please call 718-206-8494.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Foods That Are Rich in Probiotics

Probiotics are live bacterial organisms that can be consumed as dietary supplements and are also found in certain food items.  They are considered to be good bacteria that can lessen the symptoms of a variety of bowel disorders. Probiotics may improve digestive health, reduce depression, and promote heart health.

Foods that are rich in probiotics are:

  • Yogurt
  • Kefir
  • Sauerkraut
  • Sourdough bread
  • Tempeh
  • Kimichi
  • Miso
  • Pickles
  • Traditional buttermilk
  • Natto
  • Some types of cheeses (Edam, Cheddar, Gouda, Provolone, Swiss)

Probiotics are beneficial and generally very safe to consume; however, as with any supplements, speak to your physician first before taking a probiotic in supplement form.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Employee Spotlight Shines on Andres Parra

This month, we are proud to shine our Employee Spotlight on Andres Parra, Reception and Information Desk supervisor.  Andres began his career at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center eight years ago. He is a native of the Borough of Queens, having grown up in East Elmhurst and still resides in the borough.

Andres attended P.S. 148, John Bowne High School and received his BA in Criminal Justice from John Jay College of Criminal Justice.  In his free time, he enjoys spending time with his family and friends. He likes to go to art exhibits, museums, art galleries, concerts, and restaurants. He also enjoys photography. Andres tells us that his favorite types of food are Asian and Latin. Some of the places that he has travelled to are the Dominican Republic and to see family in Miami and Colombia. He is a huge fan of baseball, football, soccer and Formula 1 auto racing.  Andres was a DJ for 16 years and has an extensive knowledge of music. The genres he likes most are Latin, hip-hop, rock and house music.

Andres enjoys working at Jamaica Hospital because it gives him an opportunity to help patients and visitors on a daily basis. He takes great pride in knowing that his colleagues at the front desk are the face of the hospital as they are often the first encounter people have when they visit the building. Andres’ team stives to provide excellent customer service to the community.

We are very happy to have Andres as a member of our team and look forward to having him continue with us for many more years.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

What is Osteoarthritis ?

Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis, currently affecting  over 32 million Americans. This form of arthritis is known as the “wear and tear” disease because while it can affect almost any joint, it most commonly affects the joints in the knees, hips, hands, and spine that are subject to the most amount of movement. Women tend to be affected by osteoarthritis more often than men.

Osteoarthritis occurs when the cartilage, which is the slippery tissue which cushions your bones when they rub against one another deteriorates over time due to weight, stress, injuries or genetic factors. When this happens, people with osteoarthritis will experience a variety of issues including::

  • Joint pain
  • Joint Deformity
  • Decrease in joint mobility
  • Swelling of a joint
  • Joint crackling

Diagnosing osteoarthritis can be performed by taking an x-ray, a magnetic resonance image (MRI), and physical manipulation of the joint. Examining the joint fluid can help differentiate osteoarthritis from other types of arthritis.

Osteoarthritis may not be able to be completely avoided but there are ways to slow down its progress and to treat it. Measures to minimize osteoarthritis include:

  • Keeping active
  • Maintaining a proper weight
  • Participating in physical therapy
  • Taking medications to reduce symptoms such as acetaminophen and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS)
  • Applying transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS)
  • Receiving cortisone injections into the joint
  • Receiving injections of hyaluronic acid
  • Having Joint replacement procedures

If you are experiencing symptoms of osteoarthritis, speak with your physician to discuss what treatment option is best for you. If  you would like to schedule an appointment with a physician at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

A Delicious Fall Recipe

Today is the first day of Fall and a perfect time to prepare a delicious butternut squash casserole to welcome in the season. Here is a recipe from delish.com made with butternut squash. https://www.delish.com/cooking/recipe-ideas/a40509027/butternut-squash-casserole-recipe/

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.