The History of Eye Glasses

Over 60 percent of the adult population in the United States today wears eyeglasses. Modern day eyeglasses have their roots that date back more than 1000 years. In the middle ages Monks were known to use reading stones that were glass spheres, sometimes filled with water,  that were placed on top of objects in order to magnify them. The first documented use of eyeglasses was attributed to being developed in Italy.  In the 13th century Venetian glass blowers made the first solid glass lenses that were held by frames and that were a primitive version of modern day wearable eyeglasses.
In the 17th century eyeglasses started to be made that could correct vision. Glasses could be made with either concave lenses, for nearsightedness, or convex lenses for farsightedness. Benjamin Franklin invented bifocal lenses in 1784. Glass was the material used in the production of eyeglasses for centuries until the latter part of the 20th century when plastic became widely used in eyeglasses as it was lighter and safer than glass. Now many eyeglasses are being made from polycarbonate which is lighter still and more resilient to scratches.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Bed Wetting

Most children are completely potty trained by the age of 5 , but since we cannot determine a date when the bladder will completely develop, the statistical normal age range should be between 5 and 7 years old. However, if your child is between the ages of 5 and 7 years old and continues to have bed wetting “accidents” it may be typical or it may be an indication of other issues.

Some common medical issues that may cause bed-wetting may be that your child’s bladder is under developed or small, a hormone imbalance, a urinary tract infection, diabetes, sleep apnea or chronic constipation.

According to the Mayo Clinic, a parent or guardian should become concerned about their childs bed wetting when:

  1. Your child still wets the bed after age 7
  2. Your child starts to wet the bed after a few months of being dry at night
  3. The bed-wetting is accompanied by painful urination, unusual thirst, pink or red urine, hard stools, or snoring

Although your childs bed-wetting can be frustrating, there could be a great deal of embarassment and low self esteem associated with the condition. If the condition persists, visit to you doctor would be indicated.

If you’d like to make an appointment for your child to be examined at the Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Kale Salad

With Autumn arriving and our backyard grills safely packed away, we have provided a great kale salad recipe from allrecipies.com to compliment any fall meal choice.

 “If you slice kale thin and toss it with other tasty treats like apple, persimmon, orange, and nuts, the kale mellows out and serves as a perfect foil for other vegetation.” Chef John

 For the entire recipe please follow the link to – 

For this and more delicious recipes visit – http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Chef-Johns-Raw-Kale-Salad/Detail.aspx?evt19=1

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Reading or Prescription Eyeglasses

If your vision is blurred or you are having issues with your sight, an eye doctor will conduct a regular exam, assessing your overall eye health.  At the end of the exam, it may be suggested that you are in need of glasses.  If you do not have a serious eye condition, the doctor may suggest magnifiers or over the counter (OTC) “readers.”

When making the decision to get glasses, many people wonder if there is difference between prescription lenses and OTC glasses.  The answer is, yes.

Some differences between OTC and prescription glasses are:

  • Over the counter (OTC) readers are best used for age-related presbyopia. Presbyopia is an age-related issue where your eyes become less flexible, making it harder to focus on close objects.
  • OTC readers have the same prescription in each lens. Having the same eyesight in both eyes is extremely rare. Therefore, your vision will not be properly corrected and you may still experience difficulty focusing even when wearing OTC readers.
  • Prescriptions glasses offer more options and benefits, such as quality in materials, accurate vision correction, lens clarity, as well as scratch and glare resistance.  Additionally, unlike OTC readers, prescription glasses can help with astigmatism, myopia or glaucoma.

If you are having difficulty with your vision, you should schedule an appointment to have your eyes examined.  To schedule an appointment with the Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Ophthalmology Center call 718-206-5900.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Swimmers Ear

Swimmer’s ear is a bacterial infection that affects the outermost portion of the ear canal. A common cause is the accumulation of water in this portion of the canal that leads to a bacterial infection. It can also be caused by the insertion of unclean foreign objects into the ear that irritate the lining of the ear canal.
Signs and symptoms of swimmer’s ear are:
• Redness in the ear canal
• Itchiness in the ear
• Fluid discharge which may include pus
• Muffled hearing
• Sensation of fullness in the ear
• Fever if the infection is severe
A few factors that can make a person more susceptible to swimmer’s ear are:
• Swimming in water that isn’t clean
• Having a narrow ear canal
• Abrasion of the ear canal by improper use of a cotton swab
• Reduced production or improper removal of ear wax
It is important to treat swimmer’s ear as soon as possible in order to prevent serious complications such as hearing loss. Depending on the severity of the problem, treatment options are ear drops containing antibiotics,  steroid, and a mild acidic solution.  Have your physician evaluate the problem as soon as possible. If you would like to make an appointment with a physician at Jamaica Hospital, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

FAQ’S ABOUT INSULIN

Insulin is a proven treatment to control blood glucose levels for people living with type 2 diabetes.

Below is some frequently asked questions (FAQ’s) regarding insulin:

Q.        What is insulin?

A.        Insulin is hormone that would typically be produced by the pancreas.

Q.        Why would I need to take insulin?

A.        When blood glucose levels can no longer be controlled by diet, exercise or oral medication, your doctor may prescribe insulin as a prescription to lower your blood sugar levels. 

Q.        Why is it important to keep my glucose levels as close to normal limits as possible?

A.        High blood sugar levels can obstruct organ function which can lead to kidney failure, heart disease and may eventually cause blindness.

Q.        Does insulin have any side effects?

A.        One of the more common side effects of insulin is low blood sugar or hypoglycemia.  This condition happens when too much insulin is taken causing you to experience anxiety, sweating, dizziness, nausea, confusion and lack of coordination.  Hypoglycemia is remedied by eating or drinking a substance that contains sugar.

Q.        How is insulin administered?

A.        Insulin should be injected into the body’s fatty tissue. Be sure to rotate the injection sites since continual use in the same spot

Q.        How long will I have to take insulin?

A.        If you have type 2 diabetes, caused by a condition such as pregnancy, you may have to take insulin for a short period of time.  If your type 2 diabetes is caused by your pancreas not making enough insulin, you may need to take insulin more regularly in order to remain healthy.

I hope you have found these questions and answers helpful and informative. 

If you have additional questions or concerns regarding your blood sugar levels, diabetes or nutrition, please call the Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center at 718-206-7001 to schedule an appointment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Swim Safety Tips

The weather is warming up and people will be looking for ways to keep cool. One way that has always been popular during the warm summer months is swimming in a pool. Every year there are countless accidents and also fatalities at or near swimming pools. Many of which  could have been avoided had precautions been taken.

Safety Tips to follow:
• Never leave children unattended near a pool
• Only swim when there is a lifeguard present
• Every pool should have proper drain covers
• Pools should have alarms and proper fencing
• Keep the pool clean
• There should be no diving allowed in pools that are shallow
• Never swim alone
• There should be no horseplay in or near a pool
• Do not swim under the influence of alcohol or drugs
• Do not swim in a thunderstorm
• It is a good idea to give children swimming lessons before the start of the summer
• Children who don’t know how to swim should be given flotation devices to wear

There are many organizations around the country that offer swimming lessons for children and adults of all ages. If you don’t know how to swim, look into getting some lessons before heading out to the pool. You will have a good time and you will also be a lot safer this summer.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Summertime Allergies

If you are one of the millions of Americans who experience summertime allergies, you may want to control your seasonal symptoms with this allergy sufferer’s survival guide.

Summer allergies occur when your immune system tries to defend your body against substances that are harmless to others causing itchy or watery eyes, sneezing, wheezing, and an itchy, stuffy or runny nose.

About 50 million Americans suffer from year-round allergies to mold, dust, and pets. However, summer allergies are the mostly triggered by trees, pollen, leaves, grasses and ragweed.

There isn’t a cure for allergies, but there are ways you can find relief.  If you symptoms are minor, there are over-the-counter antihistamines or nasal sprays that may help.

The most important thing to remember is that you do not have to suffer unnecessarily.  If over– the-counter remedies aren’t working, then it’s probably a good idea to seek the advice of a doctor.

To schedule an appointment with an Allergist at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center, please call 718-206-7001

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Tips for Exercising at Home

When you’re starting a home workout program it can be hard to figure out what exercises you should perform, particularly if you don’t have the budget for pricey equipment or personal training.
Most experts will tell you that a home training program for fitness should target all your major muscle groups are targeted at least once each week. It is recommended that your program includes 30 to 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous aerobic exercise no more than three to five times a week.”
Most importantly, stretching should be a part of the workout regime. Stretching helps with both strength and flexibility.
Some proven home exercises that won’t break your piggy bank are:
• Squats. Standing upright, feet wider than shoulders apart. With your arms extended forward or your hands on your hips for balance, squat down. Push your knees outward as you descend until your thighs are parallel with the floor. Continue pushing your knees outward as you stand.
• Partial-body push-ups (with knees on the floor).
• Modified jumping jacks. Instead of moving your arms over your head, do these while you press the palms of your hands together at chest level, holding your elbows out to make a straight line.
• Chair crunches. Sit on a chair with your hands under your behind, arms straight, and fingers facing inward toward one another. Contract your pelvis and lower abs, and, keeping your knees bent at a 90-degree angle, lift your feet off the floor and tuck your knees in toward your chest while bending your upper body slightly toward your knees. Do as many as you can until you reach fatigue.
• Chair dips. Place your hands on the side of the chair and wrap your fingers around the edge. Scoot forward until your bottom is on the edge of the chair and your arms are fully extended. Keep your feet about 3 inches apart with your legs extended, so your knees are at approximately a 150 degree angle with your heels grounded. With your elbows pointed back and tucked in tight alongside your body, do 15 to 20 dips, 3 seconds down and 1 second up. Keep your chest up and your shoulders back.
It is important to speak with your Physician before beginning any exercise program, even if it is an at home program.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

National Kidney Month

March is National Kidney Month and the National Kidney Foundation is urging all Americans to give their kidneys a well-deserved checkup.

The kidneys are two, fist-sized organs in your lower back. They maintain overall health by serving following functions:

  • Filtering waste out of 200 liters of blood each day
  • Regulating of the body’s salt, potassium and acid content
  • Removing toxins from the body.
  • Balancing the body’s fluids
  • Releasing hormones that regulate blood pressure
  • Producing an active form of vitamin D that promotes strong, healthy bones
  • Controlling the production of red blood cells

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease and Control, some quick facts on Kidney Disease are:

  • Kidney disease is the 9th leading cause of death in the country.
  • More than 26 million Americans have kidney disease, and most don’t know it.
  • There are over 95,000 people waiting for kidney transplants.
  • Currently, more than 590,000 people have kidney failure in the U.S. today.

Often times, kidney failure can be prevented or delayed through early detection and proper treatment of underlying disease such as diabetes and high blood pressure which can slow additional damage to the kidneys.

If you are 18 years or older with diabetes, high blood pressure, cardiovascular disease or a family history of kidney disease, you should schedule an appointment with your doctor and ask that you be screened for kidney disease.

If you would like to make an appointment to have your Kidney’s checked, you can call Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center at 718-206-7001 for an appointment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.