#WorkoutWednesday – Running Do’s and Don’t’s

It is no secret that exercise does wonders for your health.  Running, in particular, offers many benefits, and is known to improve your mental and physical wellbeing.

In a study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, it was found that” five to 10 minutes a day of low-intensity running is enough to extend life by several years.” Similar studies have also indicated that running can help reduce the risks associated with obesity, diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure and some cancers.

Given the benefits, your doctor may recommend that you include running as part of your exercise regimen. If you decide to run, there are a few things you should keep in mind in order to prevent injury and optimize your workout. Here are some running dos and don’ts:

The Do’s:

  • Keep your head up -This will keep your body in alignment and prevent injuries
  • Stretch and warm up-This reduces muscle tightness and increases your range of motion
  • Start slowly -Starting off too fast can lead to overexertion which may result in side aches
  • Schedule rest days –Allow your body days to recover and reduce the risk of exhaustion
  • Remain hydrated- Drinking enough water will prevent dehydration

The Don’ts:

  • Do not run in shoes that are worn or not intended for running- Shoes that are worn or not designed for running may lack support and lead to injuries
  • If running outdoors, do not run with headphones – It is important to be aware of your surroundings and avoid hazards
  • Do not eat big meals before running-Eating too much can slow you down
  • Do not ignore injuries- It is important that you rest if you are injured, not doing so can lead to complications

The most important thing to consider before starting your running routine is to speak with your doctor. Experts recommend that you receive a full medical checkup if you are over the age of 40, have preexisting medical conditions, are obese or have a family history of heart disease.  Your doctor will be able to assess your health and determine if running is best for you.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Varicose Veins

According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, approximately half of Americans age 50 and older have varicose veins.  These veins appear to bulge from the skin and are dark purple or blue in color. They are most commonly located in the legs and are caused by the pooling of blood in enlarged veins.

While varicose veins are very common among both men and women, there are several factors that can increase a person’s risk of being affected. This includes:

  • Heredity
  • Hormonal changes, such as puberty, pregnancy, and menopause
  • Increasing age
  • Obesity
  • Sun exposure

The Dangers of Varicose Veins
Not only can varicose veins cause discomfort and embarrassment for the men and women who have them, but they can also sometimes lead to more serious health conditions. If left untreated, varicose veins can lead to:

  • Blood Clots- Blood clots are extremely dangerous, as they may dislodge from the vein and travel to the lungs or heart, preventing either from functioning properly.
  • Sores and Ulcers- Varicose veins may lead to sores and ulcers of the skin because of long-term buildup of fluid.

Varicose veins may also cause ongoing swelling, rashes, and pain, and can increase a person’s chances of infection.

Seeking Medical Attention
Varicose veins may signal a higher risk for circulatory problems. If you have varicose veins that cause pain, swelling, itching, tiredness, or numbness in the legs, you should seek medical attention. Jamaica Hospital offers a variety of options to treat varicose veins.

If you have varicose veins and would like to schedule a consultation with a vascular surgeon at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s, Ambulatory Care Center please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Easy Corned Beef And Cabbage Recipe

Corned beef and cabbage is a dish enjoyed by many, especially on St. Patrick’s Day. Since today is St. Patrick’s Day, we thought we’d share an easy corned beef and cabbage recipe from http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/melissa-darabian/corned-beef-and-cabbage-recipe.html

Enjoy!

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

#WorkoutWednesday Exercises That Work The Entire Body

It is recommended by the U.S. Department of Health that adults get 75 to 150 minutes of exercise each week; however, many do not have the luxury of time to work out frequently and some are confined to the office for eight hours or more each day.   Despite the limitations of a busy schedule, there are ways to fit a full body exercise regimen into your daily routine.

Some examples of full body exercises are:

  • Push-ups
  • Squats
  • Burpees
  • Lunges

Exercise is essential to your health. Although your schedule may be hectic, try to find the time for a few minutes of physical activity into your daily routine.

If you would like to learn more about the how to safely implement the techniques listed above, visit https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/324895#lunges

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

#WorkoutWednesday – Low Intensity Running

It is no secret that exercise does wonders for your health.  Running, in particular, offers many benefits, and is known to improve your mental and physical wellbeing.

In a study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, it was found that” five to 10 minutes a day of low-intensity running is enough to extend life by several years.” Similar studies have also indicated that running can help reduce the risks associated with obesity, diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure and some cancers.

Given the benefits, your doctor may recommend that you include running as part of your exercise regimen. If you decide to run, there are a few things you should keep in mind in order to prevent injury and optimize your workout. Here are some running dos and don’ts:

The Do’s:

  • Keep your head up -This will keep your body in alignment and prevent injuries
  • Stretch and warm up-This reduces muscle tightness and increases your range of motion
  • Start slowly -Starting off too fast can lead to overexertion which may result in side aches
  • Schedule rest days –Allow your body days to recover and reduce the risk of exhaustion
  • Remain hydrated- Drinking enough water will prevent dehydration

The Don’ts:

  • Do not run in shoes that are worn or not intended for running- Shoes that are worn or not designed for running may lack support and lead to injuries
  • If running outdoors, do not run with headphones – It is important to be aware of your surroundings and avoid hazards
  • Do not eat big meals before running-Eating too much can slow you down
  • Do not ignore injuries- It is important that you rest if you are injured, not doing so can lead to complications

The most important thing to consider before starting your running routine is to speak with your doctor. Experts recommend that you receive a full medical checkup if you are over the age of 40, have preexisting medical conditions, are obese or have a family history of heart disease.  Your doctor will be able to assess your health and determine if running is best for you.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Home Workout Tips

When you’re starting a home workout program it can be hard to figure out what exercises you should perform, particularly if you don’t have the budget for pricey equipment or personal training.
Most experts will tell you that a home training program for fitness should target all your major muscle groups are targeted at least once each week. It is recommended that your program includes 30 to 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous aerobic exercise no more than three to five times a week.”
Most importantly, stretching should be a part of the workout regime. Stretching helps with both strength and flexibility.
Some proven home exercises that won’t break your piggy bank are:
• Squats. Standing upright, feet wider than shoulders apart. With your arms extended forward or your hands on your hips for balance, squat down. Push your knees outward as you descend until your thighs are parallel with the floor. Continue pushing your knees outward as you stand.
• Partial-body push-ups (with knees on the floor).
• Modified jumping jacks. Instead of moving your arms over your head, do these while you press the palms of your hands together at chest level, holding your elbows out to make a straight line.
• Chair crunches. Sit on a chair with your hands under your behind, arms straight, and fingers facing inward toward one another. Contract your pelvis and lower abs, and, keeping your knees bent at a 90-degree angle, lift your feet off the floor and tuck your knees in toward your chest while bending your upper body slightly toward your knees. Do as many as you can until you reach fatigue.
• Chair dips. Place your hands on the side of the chair and wrap your fingers around the edge. Scoot forward until your bottom is on the edge of the chair and your arms are fully extended. Keep your feet about 3 inches apart with your legs extended, so your knees are at approximately a 150 degree angle with your heels grounded. With your elbows pointed back and tucked in tight alongside your body, do 15 to 20 dips, 3 seconds down and 1 second up. Keep your chest up and your shoulders back.
It is important to speak with your Physician before beginning any exercise program, even if it is an at home program.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD)

Age related Macular Degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of severe vision loss in older adults. It affects approximately 10 million Americans – more than cataracts and glaucoma combined. With an aging U.S. population, that number is only expected to increase.

AMD occurs when the central portion of the retina, known as the macula, which is responsible for focusing central vision, deteriorates.

In its early stages, Macular Degeneration does not affect vision, but as the disease progresses, people may experience wavy or blurred vision or blurred spot in the center of their vision. If the condition continues to worsen, central vision may be completely lost.

Advanced stages of AMD can affect one’s ability to read, drive a car, watch television, or perform many visual tasks. In fact, those living with AMD are considered legally blind.

There are two types of macular degeneration; dry and wet.

  • Dry AMD is an early stage of the disease. Approximately 85% to 90% of AMD cases are the dry type. Dry Macular Degeneration is diagnosed when yellowish spots known as drusen begin to accumulate in and around the macula. It is believed that these spots are deposits or debris from deteriorating tissue. A few small drusen may not cause changes in vision; however, as they grow in size and increase in number, they may lead to a dimming or distortion of vision that people find most noticeable when they read.
  • Approximately 10 percent of the cases of dry AMD progresses to the more advanced and damaging form of the disease known as wet AMD. During this phase, new blood vessels grow beneath the retina and leak blood and fluid. This leakage causes permanent damage to light-sensitive retinal cells, resulting in distorted vision including the appearance of wavy lines, as well as blind spots and loss of central vision. These abnormal blood vessels and their bleeding eventually form a scar, leading to permanent loss of central vision.

As the name implies, the biggest risk factor for AMD is age as the disease is most prevalent in those 55 and older. Another known link to AMD is smoking as it is believed to double the risk of developing the disease. AMD is most common in Caucasians and in females. People with a family history of AMD are also believed to be at a higher risk. Hypertension and obesity are also considered risk factors for Macular Degeneration by some, although there is no conclusive research linking these factors.

There is no cure for AMD, but if detected early, there are medical treatment and lifestyle changes that can delay the progression of the disease. Macular degeneration may not present any symptoms in the early stages and it may be unrecognized until it progresses. For this reason, it is important for older adults to monitor their eye site and visit their eye doctor regularly. Eye care doctors can often detect early signs of Macular Degeneration before symptoms occur. Usually this is accomplished through a retinal exam.

Jamaica Hospital’s Ophthalmology Center can diagnose and treat a wide variety of eye disorders. To make an appointment, please call 718-206-5900.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

How To Beat Mid-Day Fatigue

If you conducted a survey, most people will tell you that between the hours of 3:00PM and 4:00PM each day, a feeling of fatigue may set in which makes them feel less productive.

This is typically the time of day when they may reach for a less healthy choice of food or beverage to “perk-up.”

Many of their snack options are laden with sugar and fat and have no nutritional value.  There are several healthy foods available that give us both a boost and essential nutrients.

Some healthy foods that have been proven to help raise energy levels are:

Bananas – Bananas contain carbohydrates, potassium and vitamin B6, all proven to boost energy levels in your body.

  • Sweet Potatoes – Sweet potatoes contain fiber and complex carbs, as well as manganese, which can help break down nutrients in order to produce energy.
  • Brown Rice – Brown Rice is less processed than white rice so it retains more fiber, vitamins and minerals. It also has a low glycemic index and could help regulate blood sugar levels to help maintain steady energy levels all day long.
  • Coffee – Coffee is rich in caffeine. Caffeine quickly passes from your bloodstream to your brain.  The result is the production of epinephrine.  Epinephrine is a hormone that stimulates the body and brain allowing you to keep more focused.
  • Eggs – Eggs are rich in protein and leucine. These are both known to stimulate energy.
  • Water – Not drinking enough water could cause dehydration which can cause your body functions to slow down and make you feel sluggish. It is a good habit to drink water throughout your day, even if you are not thirsty.
  • Dark Chocolate – Dark chocolate has a high content of cocoa. Cocoa has antioxidants that have proven health benefits, like increasing your blood flow.  An increased blood flow helps deliver oxygen to the brain and muscles, improving their functions.   Additionally, dark chocolate contains compounds such as caffeine, a known ingredient to enhance mental energy and mood.

If you’d like to speak with a Jamaica Hospital Medical Center licensed nutritionist, call 718-206-7001 to schedule an appointment.

For these and other healthy food and beverages that can give your day a boost, visit healthline.com.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

How Long Can I Wear The Same Mask?

Nowadays, one of the more frequently asked questions is, “How long can I wear the same mask?”

The answer to that question varies depending on the type of mask you are wearing. 

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) the best practices for cleansing the more commonly used masks are as follows:

  • Cloth cotton – Wash you cloth mask whenever it gets dirty or at least daily in warm soapy water or in your washing machine.
  • Non-medical disposable – Single use masks should be thrown away after one wearing.
  • Face shields and goggles – Clean and disinfect reusable face shields according to the manufacturer’s instructions.  If disposable, wear it once and discard it according to the manufacturer’s instructions.

To learn more about these and other types of masks and how to care for them, visit:

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prevent-getting-sick/how-to-wash-cloth-face-coverings.html

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Integrative Care Therapies That May Benefit Your Health

What is Integrative Health?

At Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, we are devoted to providing Integrative Health in Queens, New York. We created this program to help prevent disease onset, address existing chronic conditions, and promote healing in our patients. Integrative health is the coordinated delivery of evidence-based conventional medical care, complementary medicine and lifestyle modifications for producing optimal health and well-being. It combines the very best of traditional medicine with a variety of alternative treatment options as well as self-care practices to promote healing and overall wellness

What Does Integrative Health Involve?

Integrative health is an approach that places the patient at the center of a treatment plan that takes into the account the physical, emotional and social needs of that individual.

When creating a treatment plan, Integrative healthcare providers apply healthcare strategies that includes the use of alternative medicine that is supported by medical research. This concept is also referred to as evidence-based care.

Treatment plans may include the use of conventional medicine, such as prescriptions, to manage chronic health conditions, as well as alternative therapies, such as yogameditation, acupuncture and massage therapy, as well as self-care strategies to promote healing and wellness. Additionally, patients are encouraged to develop healthy behaviors that they can use on a daily basis to improve their health and prevent the development of certain diseases.

This way of practicing medicine allows our providers to deliver the right care at the right time to the right patient based on their individual needs.

How Can Integrative Health Benefit You?

Integrative health offers many advantages. As a patient you will receive individualized and holistic care that addresses your unique health needs.


An integrative approach to your health can help you to better manage symptoms of conditions that include:

  • Chronic pain
  • Fatigue
  • Joint pain
  • Anxiety and depression
  • Cancer
  • Digestive disorders
  • Sleep disorders
  • Diabetes
  • Hypertension
  • Fibromyalgia

To learn more about our integrative health program in Queens New York, please call 718-206-7849.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.