Causes of Watery Eyes

There are a number of ailments that can cause your eyes to be watery.  The three most common causes are a cold, allergies and Dry Eye Syndrome. The most common medical cause being, Dry Eye Syndrome.

According to healthline.com some other causes of watery eye could be:

  • weather conditions such as dusty weather, wind, cold, and sunshine
  • environmental factors such as bright light and smog
  • inflammation of the eyelid 
  • eyelid turned outward or inward 
  • ingrown eyelash 
  • pink eye  or other infections
  • injury, such as a cut or scrape on the eye
  • some prescription medications

(to see the entire list of common causes, visit healthline.com)

According to the American Optometric Association, some symptoms affiliated with watery eyes or Dry Eye Syndrome are:

  • Gritty, irritated, scratchy or burning eyes
  • The feeling of something in the eyes
  • Excess watering
  • Blurred vision

Watery eyes can develop for a number of reasons including medical conditions such as diabetes and thyroid disease, aging, your gender or certain medications you are taking that can reduce tear production.

In mild cases, symptoms can often me managed using over the counter artificial tear solutions.

In either case, if symptoms persist you should seek medical attention.  If you are experiencing prolonged symptoms and would like to make an appointment to see one of our doctors, please call the Jamaica Hospital Medical Center Ambulatory Care Center at 718-206-7001 for an appointment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

COVID SYMPTOMS IN CHILDREN

According to the Mayo Clinic, children of all ages can become ill with coronavirus disease (COVID-19). But most kids who are infected typically don’t become as sick as adults and some might not show any symptoms at all.

Children and adults experience similar symptoms of COVID-19, children’s symptoms tend to be mild and cold-like. Most children recover within one to two weeks. Possible symptoms can include:

  • Fever or chills
  • Nasal congestion or runny nose
  • Cough
  • Sore throat
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
  • Fatigue
  • Headache
  • Muscle aches or body aches
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Poor feeding or poor appetite
  • New loss of taste or smell
  • Belly pain

To determine whether your child has COVID-19, a test using a long-stemmed swab can be administered by a medical professional.  If the test is positive for COVID, it is recommended that you teat mild symptoms such as fever and body aches with acetaminophen or ibuprofen.  Be sure to follow the appropriate guidelines for dosages. Additionally, make sure your child gets plenty of fluids and rest.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Sickle Cell Awareness Month

Sickle cell disease is an inherited form of anemia – a condition in which red blood cells are unable to carry oxygen throughout the body. For most, red blood cells are round and can move easily through blood vessels, but the red blood cells in people with sickle cell disease are crescent, or half-moon shaped. These irregular shaped cells can get stuck in blood vessels, which can slow or block the flow of oxygen to certain parts of the body.

In addition to being irregular in shape, sickle cells are fragile and break apart easily. Normal red blood cells live an average of four months before they die and need to be replaced. Sickle-shaped cells however only live an average of 20 days. The result of this shortage of blood cells is a loss of energy and general sense of fatigue.
Other symptoms of sickle cell disease include:

• Hand-Foot Syndrome – Often the first sign of sickle cell disease. It is caused by a lack of blood flow to the hands and feet

• Episodes of Pain – Referred to as a “crisis”, these episodes of pain occur when blood flow is blocked to the chest, abdomen, and joints. The frequency and duration of the episodes vary from person to person, but in severe cases, they can result in hospitalization.

• Frequent Infections and Fever– Sickle Cell can cause damage to the spleen, an organ that fights infection, making those with sickle cell at greater risk of developing an infection and an accompanying fever.

• Changes in Skin – People with sickle cell disease can develop a yellow tint to their skin or the whites of their eyes. Skin and nail beds can often become pale.

• Delayed growth – By not receiving enough oxygen rich red blood cells, those with sickle cell disease may also not get the necessary nutrients essential for growth.

The risk of inheriting sickle cell disease is a genetic one. For a baby to be born with it, both parents must carry the sickle cell gene. Doctors can diagnose sickle cell disease before a child is born. Couples who are at risk for passing on this disease to their children may want to talk with a genetic counselor about prenatal testing. The sickle cell gene is more common in families that come from Africa, India, Carribbean islands, and Central and South America.

To determine if you have sickle cell disease, your doctor can order a test to check for hemoglobin S, the defective form of hemoglobin that underlies sickle cell anemia. Further tests can confirm the existence of one gene (carrying the sickle cell trait) or two genes (sickle cell anemia). For those who have sickle cell anemia, treatment is aimed at treating the symptoms and avoiding crisis. Regular check-ups to monitor your red blood cell count are important. Medications are available to reduce pain and prevent complications can be prescribed, and blood transfusions, supplemental oxygen and even bone marrow transplants may also be necessary.

Jamaica Hospital serves a culturally rich and diverse population. Many members of our community are from the parts of the world most often affected by sickle cell disease. We encourage anyone living with sickle cell disease to carefully manage their condition. The hospital also recommends all potential parents to be tested for the sickle cell trait.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Healthy Labor Day Cookout Tips

One of the best things about the Labor Day Weekend is spending time with family and friends at cookouts and barbeques. While we look forward to these outings, the foods found can cause us to pack on the pounds. Whether attending or hosting your a Labor Day gathering, try some of these calorie conscious techniques:

• Skip the chips and dip. Instead, try healthier alternatives, like fresh vegetables. If you want to make a dip, use non-fat yogurt instead of sour cream or mayonnaise.

• Try kabobs. They offer the same opportunity to enjoy grilled chicken, beef, or pork, but minus the bread. Plus, the grilled vegetables on them will help you fill up.

• If you insist on having a burger or hot dog, choose healthier options, such as chicken or turkey instead of beef. Also, avoid whit flout buns and breads and opt for whole grains instead.

• Instead of heavy macaroni or potato salads loaded with mayonnaise, look for salads with a vinaigrette base as a lighter alternative.

• Don’t limit yourself to just grilling meat. There are many types of fish that are not only healthier, but also taste great on the grill. Vegetables, lightly coated in olive oil are also tasty and filling.

• For dessert, serve some refreshing summer fruit, such as cherries, peaches, plums or melons.
By following these tips, you can still enjoy your end of summer, but not pay for it in the fall.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Pineapple Salsa Grilled Chicken

Looking for a healthy, refreshing summer meal? Try this great recipe for Pineapple Salsa Grilled Chicken!

INGREDIENTS

  • Juice of 4 limes, divided
  • 1/4 c. 
  • plus 1 tbsp. freshly chopped cilantro
  • 1/4 c. 
  • extra-virgin olive oil, plus more for grill
  • 2 tsp. 
  • honey
  • Kosher salt
  • 1 lb. 
  • boneless skinless chicken breasts
  • 2 c. 
  • chopped pineapple
  • avocado, diced
  • 1/4 
  • red onion, diced
  • Freshly ground black pepper

DIRECTIONS

  1. Make marinade: In a large bowl, whisk together juice of 3 limes, 1/4 cup cilantro, oil, and honey and season with salt.
  2. Add chicken to a large resealable plastic bag and pour in marinade. Let marinate in the refrigerator at least 2 hours, or up to overnight.
  3. When ready to grill, heat grill to high. Oil grates and grill chicken until charred and cooked through, 8 minutes per side.
  4. Meanwhile, in a medium bowl, stir together pineapple, avocado, red onion, remaining lime juice, and remaining tablespoon cilantro. Season with salt and pepper.
  5. Spoon salsa over chicken before serving.

For this an other healthy recipes, visit https://www.delish.com/cooking/recipe-ideas/recipes/a47355/grilled-honey-lime-chicken-with-pineapple-salsa-recipe/

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Nat’l Immunization Awareness Month

August is National Immunization Awareness Month. The importance of this designation is to make people aware about the different types of vaccines they should get throughout their lifetime. Vaccines are important to keep the body healthy by building up an immunity to serious diseases. If you would like to make an appointment with a physician at Jamaica Hospital, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

World Hepatitis Day

In 2010 the World Health Organization ( W.H.O. ) designated July 28th as World Hepatitis Day. This serves to increase awareness about viral hepatitis and to influence change in disease prevention, testing and treatment.

Hepatitis is a virus that causes an inflammation of the liver. The liver is an organ in the body that processes nutrients, filters the blood and fights infections.

The most common forms of hepatitis are A, B, and C. Hepatitis B and C kill close to 1.4 million people each year and cause almost 80 percent of all liver cancer cases. Many people have the hepatitis virus and are unaware of it.
Symptoms of acute hepatitis B include:
• Fever
• Nausea
• Loss of appetite
• Jaundice
• Abdominal pain
• Fatigue

Hepatitis is spread from person to person through contact with bodily fluids. It is possible that people remain without symptoms for many years but during this time the disease is slowly destroying the liver. It can take many years for the symptoms to appear.

Blood tests are available that can detect the virus at an early stage.
Ways to reduce infection:
• Use only sterile equipment for injections
• Test all donated blood for hepatitis
• Practice safe sex
• Encourage people to get hepatitis B vaccine

Medication exists that can cure hepatitis C and can control hepatitis B infection. When given properly, people are less likely to die from liver cancer and cirrhosis and also are less likely to transmit the disease to others. The hepatitis B vaccine is given in three doses over a six month period and it is recommended that it be initiated right after birth if possible.

To make an appointment with a physician at Jamaica Hospital to discuss the vaccine, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Summer Is Kidney Stone Season

They are less than a centimeter in size, yet they can cause intense discomfort.  Kidney stones are one of the most painful urologic disorders, and they occur more frequently during the summer because our bodies loose more water due to sweating, which can result in dehydration.

Kidney stones are small, hard masses made of mineral and acid salts that develop in the urine.  No single factor causes kidney stones, and not everyone is susceptible to them.  Several factors often work together to create an environment in which at-risk people develop kidney stones.  People most at risk for kidney stones include:

• Adults
• Males
• Those with family or personal history of kidney stones
• Those with personal history of digestive diseases and/or surgery

In general, kidney stones form when the fluid and various mineral and acids that make up urine are out of balance.  “With adequate hydration, calcium and other crystal-forming substances properly dissolve in the urine,” says Ricardo Ricciardi, MD, Director of Urology at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center. 

Although genetics, family history, and some medical conditions can increase your odds of developing kidney stones, you can still play a role in preventing them through the following steps:

• Drink enough water. “If you’re prone to kidney stones, your best defense is to stay hydrated during hot summer months,” says Dr. Ricciardi.  “Hot temperatures make your body lose more water than usual, so it is important to replenish it throughout the day, depending on your weight and activity level.”

• Eat less meat.  Diets rich in animal protein increase your risk for kidney stones; so try to incorporate other protein sources, such as beans, nuts and seeds, instead.

• Limit your salt intake.  Excess salt absorbs water in your system, which can also dehydrate you.  Limit your daily sodium intake to 1,500 mg or less by avoiding fast food, reading nutrition labels when you buy groceries, and cooking with less salt and more herbs and spices.

• Drink less caffeine.  Even though you may think you are getting enough liquid by consuming caffeinated sodas, coffee, or tea, caffeine is a diuretic, meaning it can dehydrate you.
Sneaking Symptoms

Kidney stones often do not cause symptoms.  If the crystals are small enough, they may pass through the urinary tract and out of the body without being felt.  If a stone is large enough to attract attention, however, the first symptom is usually severe pain in the backside that begins when the stone moves into the urinary tract, blocking the flow of urine.  The pain may later spread to the groin and lower abdomen.  Other symptoms include a persistent urge to urinate, painful urination, and pink, red, or brown urine.

Seek medical attention if you have pain accompanied by nausea and vomiting or fever and chills, or if pain is so severe that you cannot sit still or find a comfortable position. If you are experiencing any of the symptoms mentioned, or suspect you have Kidney Stones and would like to schedule an appointment, please contact Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center at 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Swim Safety Tips

The weather is warming up and people will be looking for ways to keep cool. One way that has always been popular during the warm summer months is swimming in a pool. Every year there are countless accidents and also fatalities at or near swimming pools. Many of which  could have been avoided had precautions been taken.

Safety Tips to follow:
• Never leave children unattended near a pool
• Only swim when there is a lifeguard present
• Every pool should have proper drain covers
• Pools should have alarms and proper fencing
• Keep the pool clean
• There should be no diving allowed in pools that are shallow
• Never swim alone
• There should be no horseplay in or near a pool
• Do not swim under the influence of alcohol or drugs
• Do not swim in a thunderstorm
• It is a good idea to give children swimming lessons before the start of the summer
• Children who don’t know how to swim should be given flotation devices to wear

There are many organizations around the country that offer swimming lessons for children and adults of all ages. If you don’t know how to swim, look into getting some lessons before heading out to the pool. You will have a good time and you will also be a lot safer this summer.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Benefits of Pineapple

Pineapple’s have been trending in both pop culture and as an amazing source nutrition packed with antioxidants that can fight inflammation and disease.

According to healthline, some of the most widely known benefits of pineapple’s are:

  • Packed with nutrients.
  • Contains disease fighting antioxidants known as flavonoids and phenolic acids.
  • Contains enzymes that can ease digestion.
  • May help reduce the risk of cancer.
  • May boost immunity and suppress inflammation.
  • May ease the symptoms of Arthritis.
  • May speed recovery after surgery or strenuous exercise.
  • Tastes delicious and is easy to add to your diet.

If you’d like to learn more about the benefits of pineapple’s, visit healthline.com.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.