Signs and Symptoms Of A Blood Clot

Signs and Symptoms of a blood clot-vascular doctor in Queens

According to the American Society of Hematology, “Blood clotting is an important process that prevents, excessive bleeding when a blood vessel is injured.” Typically,  once injuries have healed,  our bodies naturally dissolve clots- allowing blood vessels to function normally when transporting blood.

However, there are instances in which blood clots do not form as a result of injury and do not dissolve on their own.  Blood clots may also form as a result of complications caused by obesity, pregnancy, prolonged sitting, smoking, certain medications or diseases.  When clots do not dissolve they can lead to serious health issues such as stroke or heart attack.

Knowing the signs and symptoms of a blood clot can help you to recognize a potential threat to your health and seek treatment in a timely manner. Signs and symptoms include:

  • Swelling
  • Change in color in arms or legs
  • Pain in chest, arms or legs
  • Lower leg cramps
  • A warm spot on the leg
  • Trouble breathing
  • Coughing up blood
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • High blood pressure
  • Blood in urine
  • Fever
  • Light-headedness
  • Headache
  • Speech or vision difficulties

If you are experiencing these symptoms, seek medical attention right away.  This may save your life or reduce the severity of certain complications. Treatment is determined by the location of the blood clot and may include surgery or medication (anticoagulants or thrombolytics).

To schedule a visit with a doctor at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-7001

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Treat Your Blood Clots, It Could Save Your Life

Lower limb vascular examination

A blood clot is a clump of blood that is in a gelatinous, solid state. Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a serious condition that occurs when a blood clot forms in a vein located deep inside your body. Deep vein blood clots typically form in your thigh or lower leg, but they can also develop in other areas of your body.

According to the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, symptoms of DVT only occur in about half of the people who have this condition. Common symptoms include:

  • swelling in your foot, ankle, or leg, usually on one side
  • cramping pain in your affected leg that usually begins in your calf
  • severe, unexplained pain in your foot and ankle
  • an area of skin that feels warmer than the skin on the surrounding areas
  • skin over the affected area turning pale or a reddish or bluish color

DVT occurs most commonly in people who are over 50 years in age. Certain conditions that alter how your blood moves through your veins can raise your risk of developing clots. These include:

  • being overweight, which puts more pressure on the veins in your legs and pelvis
  • having a family history of DVT
  • having a catheter placed in a vein
  • staying seated for a long time while you’re in a car or on a plane, especially if you already have at least one other risk factor

To better control and treat DVT, your doctor may prescribe medication and suggest daily routines to decrease your risk. DVT treatments focus on keeping the clot from growing. Your doctor might prescribe medications that thin your blood, making it harder for blood clots to appear. Another treatment method is wearing compression stockings that prevent swelling and lower your chance of developing clots.

You can lower your risk of having DVT by making a few lifestyle changes. These include keeping your blood pressure under control, giving up smoking, and losing weight if you’re overweight. Moving your legs around when you’ve been sitting for a while also helping to keep your blood flowing. Walking around after being on bed rest can prevent clots from forming. Take any blood thinners your doctor prescribes if you’re having surgery, as this can lower your chance of developing clots afterward.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Information About Varicose Veins

According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, approximately half of Americans age 50 and older have varicose veins. These veins are most commonly located in the legs, appear to bulge from the skin and are dark purple or blue in color.

ThinkstockPhotos-483873488The veins in a person’s legs carry blood back up to the heart and should only allow blood to flow in one direction. However, when the valves in a person’s veins become weak and allow blood to flow away from the heart, blood pools and the veins in that area become stretched or enlarged, thereby, creating a varicose vein.

While varicose veins are very common among both men and women, there are several factors that can increase a person’s risk of being affected. These include:
 Heredity
 Hormonal changes, such as puberty, pregnancy, and menopause
 Increasing age
 Obesity
 Sun exposure

Not only can varicose veins cause discomfort and embarrassment for the men and women who have them, but they can also sometimes lead to more serious health conditions. If left untreated, varicose veins can lead to:

 Blood Clots- These are extremely dangerous, as they may dislodge from the vein and travel to the lungs or heart, preventing either from functioning properly.
 Sores and Ulcers- Varicose veins may lead to sores and ulcers of the skin because of long-term buildup of fluid.

Varicose veins may also cause ongoing swelling, rashes, and pain, and can increase a person’s chances of infection.

Varicose veins may signal a higher risk for circulatory problems. If you have varicose veins that cause pain, swelling, itching, tiredness, or numbness in the legs, you should seek medical attention. Jamaica Hospital Department of Vascular Surgery offers a variety of options to treat varicose veins.
Treatment options available include:

 Sclerotherapy: A solution is injected to seal off the area in which blood is pooling.
 Laser treatment: Without the use of needles or incisions, strong bursts of light are delivered precisely onto varicose veins to make them fade and eventually disappear.
 Endovenous Radiofrequency: A catheter is inserted into the vein and radiofrequency or laser energy seals the vein wall. This approach is used in treating deeper varicose veins.
 Surgical litigation and stripping: Varicose veins are removed entirely.

If you have varicose veins and would like to schedule a consultation with a vascular surgeon at Jamaica Hospital, please call 718-206-7108.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.