Grandma’s Chicken Soup

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When you have a cold or flu, it is best to keep hydrated and drink at least eight glasses of fluid a day.  A great way to keep hydrated, help relieve the symptomscongested nose and sore throat is to eat chicken soup.

Researchers believe that substances in chicken soup can help reduce the inflammation associated with a cold or flu.

If you would like to test the effects of chicken soup on your cold or flu you may want to try

Grandma’s Chicken Noodle Soup Recipe –

Ingredients:

2 ½ cups wide egg noodles

1 teaspoon vegetable oil

12 cups chicken broth

1 ½ tablespoons salt

1 teaspoon poultry seasoning

1 cup chopped celery

1 cup diced carrots

1 cup chopped onion

1/3 cup cornstarch

¼ cup water

3 cups diced, cooked chicken meat

Directions:

  1. Bring large pot of lightly salted water to a boil.  Add egg noodles and oil, boil for 8 minutes, or until tender.  Drain and rinse under cool running water.
  2. In a large saucepan or Dutch oven, combine broth, salt, and poultry seasoning.  Bring to a boil.  Stir in celery and onion.  Reduce heat, cover and simmer for 15 minutes.
  3. In a small bowl, mix cornstarch and water together until cornstarch is completely dissolved. Gradually add to soup, stirring constantly.  Stir in noodles and chicken, and heat through.

Serves 12

For this and other easy, delicious recipes you may want to visit www.allrecipies.com.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Arthritis and Exercise

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Did you know that if you have arthritis, exercise may benefit your bones, muscles and joints?

Now, that doesn’t mean you have to run a marathon or swim with the intensity of an Olympic competitor.  Low impact exercise can help improve your health and fitness without hurting your joints. These exercises may include raising your arms over head or rolling your shoulders.

In conjunction with a treatment plan, exercise can:

  • Strengthen the muscles around your joints
  • Help you maintain bone strength
  • Give you more energy to get through the day
  • Make it easier to get a good night’s sleep
  • Help you control your weight
  • Improve your balance
  • Enhance your quality of life

Exercises can relieve stiffness and increase your ability to move your joints through their full range of motion.  It is always good to speak with your doctor about fitting exercise into your treatment plan.  The types of exercises that are best for you will depend on your type of arthritis and which joints are affected.

If you have arthritis and would like to explore adding exercise to your treatment plan, you can speak with one of the dozens of trained physicians at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center.  To make an appointment with a physician, call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

SNACK CHIPS THAT WON’T GO STRAIGHT TO YOUR HIPS!

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With the holiday season in full swing and snacking at an all-time high, you may be interested in this delicious and healthy alternative potato chips for your party table…

Cracked Pepper Potato Chips with Onion Dip

Ingredient’s for the chips:

  • 3 Large russet potatoes (2 ¼  pounds total), sliced into 1/8-inch thick rounds
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 teaspoons coarsely ground black pepper
  • Salt

 

Ingredient’s for the dip:

  • 2 teaspoons olive oil
  • 1 small onion, minced
  • 2 scallions, thinly slices, greens and whites separated
  • 1 ¼ cups nonfat Greek style yogurt or 1 2/3 cups regular nonfat plain yogurt
  • ¼ cup of mayonnaise
  • ¾ teaspoon garlic powder
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ teaspoon pepper

How to make this recipe:

Chips – Toss potatoes in a large bowl with 2 tablespoons of oil, and pepper until well coated.   Preheat oven to 450 degrees F.  Arrange potato slices in 1 layer on 2 cookie sheets.  Bake for 20 to 25 minutes until chips are crisped and lightly browned.  Remove from oven, season with salt and cool.

Dip – Heat oil over a medium heat and add onions and scallion whites.  Cook, stirring often, until golden brown and soft, about 10 minutes.  Remove from heat and allow to cool.  If using  regular yogurt, place it in a strainer lined with a paper towel and set the strainer over a bowl.  Let the yogurt drain and thicken for 20 minutes.

Combine onions with thickened or Greek style yogurt, mayonnaise, onion powder, garlic powder, salt pepper and scallion greens and stir well to incorporate.  Chill for 1 hour to let flavors meld.

Serve with chips

Excellent source of Vitamin C

Good source of Potassium

For more healthy snack recipes visit http://www.foodnetwork.com/healthy/packages/healthy-every-week/healthy-appetizer-recipes/healthy-appetizer-recipes.html

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

How “Annual” Is Your Annual Physical?

HypertesionThinkstockPhotos-477722758A.  Yearly

B. Bi-Yearly

C. When I don’t feel good

D. I don’t do doctors

 

An annual exam is a good way of tracking your health progress.  Some of the benefits are:

  • Primary prevention
  • To identify risk factors for common chronic diseases
  • To detect disease that has no apparent symptoms (secondary prevention)
  • A way for the doctor to counsel people to promote healthy behavior
  • To update clinical data since your last check-up
  • To enhance the relationship betweenyou and your doctor

If you are interested in scheduling an exam, Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center is centrally located and has convenient hours.  Call 718-206-7001 for an appointment.

 

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Gastrointestinal Disorders Awareness Week

Every year, during the week of Thanksgiving, the International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders promotes GERD Awareness week. This week was chosen  because it is the start of the holiday season, a time of year when people tend to eat more than they normally do. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disorder  (GERD ) is a disease that occurs when the contents of the stomach flow backwards into the esophagus and cause a burning sensation. One of the consequences of overeating is heartburn, a side effect of GERD.
GERD can be controlled by following these tips:
• Don’t eat meals late at night
• Avoid fatty foods like chips, dips and cheeses
• Remain active and exercise whenever possible
• Do not smoke
• Keep away from citrus juices that tend to be acidic
• Limit alcohol consumption
• Keep away from fried foods
• Limit desserts especially those containing chocolate
• Try to stay awake  for at least three hours after a large meal
• Avoid caffeinated beverages
GERD can be treated with medication and by changes in eating habits. If you would like to schedule an appointment with a gastroenterologist at Jamaica Hospital, please call 718-206-6742.GERD

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

VEGAN CREAMY PUMPKIN SOUPN (GLUTEN FREE)

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For a creamy and vegan pumpkin soup recipe sprinkled with almonds and fresh rosemary, try the recipe below.

Serves: 3

Prep time – 5 minutes

Cook time – 25 minutes

Total time – 30 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • ½ onion, diced
  • ½ pumpkin, peeled and cubed
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 tablespoon fresh rosemary, diced
  • 4-5 cups vegetable broth
  • ½-1 cup coconut milk

Instructions

  1. Heat oil in pot over medium heat. Add onion and cook for a few minutes until translucent. Add pumpkin and garlic and continue to cook for a few more minutes.
  2. Add rosemary and vegetable broth. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to low and simmer until pumpkin is soft and cooked through. Add salt to taste.
  3. Puree soup in a blender (in batches) and return to the pot.
  4. Add coconut milk and simmer for another minute or two.

Give this recipe a try. It is simply delicious and healthy too.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

How Stress Affects Your Digestive System

Our brain and gut are mostomach pain -178554755re in sync than you may realize.  For instance, the very thought of food can cause the stomach to produce digestive juices or the thought of giving a big presentation may cause constipation or uncontrollable bowels.The brain and gut are in constant communication. This direct relationship causes our gastrointestinal system to be sensitive to emotions and reactions such as stress.

When we are stressed, our brain sends signals for chemicals such as adrenaline, serotonin (a hormone that affects mood and is found in the digestive system) as well as the stress hormone cortisol to be released.  These hormones can cause adverse reactions.

Stress negatively affects our digestive system in many ways. It can cause a decrease in blood and oxygen flow to the stomach, cramping, an imbalance in gut bacteria and inflammation.  These symptoms can further develop into gastro intestinal (GI) disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), irritable bowel disease (IBD), peptic ulcers or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).

There are several things you can do to reduce stress and improve gut health. Practicing stress-management techniques such as exercising regularly, avoiding stressors, socializing, getting sufficient sleep or relaxing can greatly minimize your levels of stress.

In addition to practicing stress reduction techniques, you can support your digestive health by drinking less alcoholic beverages or consuming less sugar- as too much sugar can cause an imbalance in the ratio of good and bad bacteria in the stomach. Increasing your intake of foods that promote digestive health such as those rich in probiotics or foods that aid the body in producing digestive enzymes is also helpful.

The gut is often referred to as “the second brain” of the body. If you are experiencing consistent complications of the digestive system, your body is probably trying to tell you that there may be a bigger problem. Make an appointment with a gastroenterologist who specializes in the treatment of gastrointestinal, liver, and pancreatic disorders to examine your symptoms.

Jamaica Hospital’s Division of Gastroenterology consists of board-certified gastroenterologists who provide high quality and expert care to patients who suffer from such conditions in both inpatient and outpatient settings. To schedule an appointment, please call 718 206 6742 or 718 206 7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Can Some Bacteria be Good for You?

Bacteria. The word alone makes us think of infection, disease and illness. We hate all bacteria, right?

ThinkstockPhotos-482096272Actually, there is such a thing as GOOD bacteria. They are called probiotics and they help you maintain a healthy digestive system. They do this by lowering “bad” bacteria that can cause infections and other problems. Sometimes we don’t have enough good bacteria in our systems (for instance, like when we are on antibiotics). A lack of good bacteria can cause a variety of digestive issues. By taking probiotics, we are replacing those good bacteria which are sometimes lost.

Probiotics are most commonly taken to help prevent or improve common digestive problems such as irritable bowel syndrome and diarrhea. Others have suggested that they are also beneficial in treating skin conditions, such as eczema, improving urinary and vaginal health, and preventing colds and allergies.

Your body naturally generates probiotics, but if you want to increase your good bacteria levels, you can take probiotics in supplement form or get them by eating certain foods, most notably yogurt and other fermented products.

Probiotics are natural so they are generally considered safe to take, even in supplement form. It is recommended that you speak to your doctor about the best way of incorporating probiotics into your diet.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

September 13th – National Celiac Disease Awareness Day

ThinkstockPhotos-538179807Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder that damages the small intestine, preventing the absorption of nutrients from food. It is triggered by the consumption of a protein called gluten, which can be found in wheat, barley, and rye. Approximately one percent of the population suffers from celiac disease and it affects men and women across all ages and races.

Symptoms vary depending on the age of onset, but in general, celiac disease, or gluten intolerance as it is also known, generally results in: abdominal pain, bloating, diarrhea, vomiting, poor appetite, lethargy, irritability and depression.

Children with celiac disease fail to gain weight and have a late onset of puberty. Adults with the disease also can develop anemia, joint and bone pain, arthritis, itchy rash, and mouth sores.

Accurately diagnosing celiac disease is difficult because the symptoms are similar to other diseases, but if left untreated, it can lead to serious health risks including infertility, neurological disorders, some cancers, and other auto-immune diseases.

Currently, there is no medication to cure celiac disease. The only way to treat the disease is through a strict, life-long gluten free diet, which means avoiding all foods that contain wheat, rye, and barley. Despite these restrictions, many people with celiac disease can still enjoy a well-balanced diet, with a variety of foods including bread and pasta. Due to increased awareness of celiac disease, there are many gluten-free alternatives now available; in fact sales of gluten-free products are expected to exceed $5 billion in 2015.

September 13th is National Celiac Disease Awareness Day. If you think you or a loved one has celiac disease, make an appointment with your doctor. A series of blood tests can help determine if you have it. If you are diagnosed with celiac disease, together, you, your doctor, and your family can map out a plan to help you live a healthy, gluten-free lifestyle.

If you do not have a doctor, please call Jamaica Hospital’s Family Medicine Center to schedule an appointment at 718-657-7093.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.