Jamaica Hospital First In Queens To Successfully Complete DVT Procedure Using Protrieve™ and ClotTriever BOLD™

Jamaica Hospital Medical Center is the first hospital in Queens to use Protrieve™ and ClotTriever BOLD™ for the treatment of deep vein thrombosis (DVT).

DVT occurs when blood clots develop within a vein located deep inside the body, usually in the legs, but can form in other places such as the pelvis and the arms. These clots block or slow the flow of blood to the rest of the body.

Deep vein thrombosis can happen as a result of injury to the veins, certain medical conditions that affect how blood clots, or being sedentary for an extended period (for example sitting for a long time on a flight without moving).

Symptoms of DVT include lower extremity swelling, red or discolored skin, pain, or a warm feeling in the affected area. In more severe cases, clots may detach and travel to the lungs resulting in a pulmonary embolism, which is potentially life-threatening.

There are several options available to treat DVT. The most common is anticoagulation or the use of blood thinners to prevent new clots from forming. However, anticoagulants do not break down existing clots. An effective treatment for this issue is the use of thrombolytics or “clot-busting” drugs to help dissolve clots in patients with moderate to severe DVT. Although thrombolytic therapy is effective, it is associated with a higher risk of major and fatal bleeding and requires a stay in the ICU.

The Protrieve™ and ClotTriever BOLD™ are important new options for the treatment of moderate or severe DVT. Both are FDA-cleared, clinically proven, and minimally invasive devices, specially designed for the removal of large volumes of clots from the deep vein. DVT removal is completed in a single-session treatment that avoids the use of thrombolytics and an ICU stay. The procedure also offers a lower risk of bleeding, immediate symptom improvement, and faster recovery times.

Jamaica Hospital utilizes cutting-edge surgical technology to treat a wide variety of conditions, including those that are prevalent in its community. As the closest hospital to John F. Kennedy International Airport, where many travelers flying long distances are at risk for DVT and one that serves a population with a high incidence of vascular conditions, having sophisticated tools such as the Protrieve™ and ClotTriever BOLD™ is advantageous in ensuring the best possible outcomes for patients.

Jamaica Hospital is recognized as one of the nation’s leading hospitals for surgery. The hospital is ranked number two in New York for surgical care by Healthgrades. It is also the top-ranked hospital in Queens, New York, and is among the top 5% in the nation for this area of expertise.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Wearing Compression Socks During Long Flights

Staying seated during long-haul flights lasting four or more hours can slow down the flow of blood in the legs.

A slow-down in circulation can increase the risk of pulmonary embolism or deep vein thrombosis. Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) occurs when blood clots form in the deep veins in the legs.  Pulmonary embolism (PE) occurs when there is a blockage in the pulmonary arteries in the lungs.  This is most likely caused by a blood clot that traveled from the deep veins in the legs to the lungs.

DVT  and PE can lead to serious and potentially fatal complications.  However, there are several things you can do to reduce the risk of developing these problems while flying, one of which is wearing compression socks.

Compression socks work by squeezing or placing pressure on the veins in the legs and feet. This helps with improving circulation and preventing blood from pooling in the veins.

Additional health benefits gained by wearing compression socks are:

  • They can help ease swelling in the feet
  • They can provide some relief to tired and achy feet
  • They can help improve lymphatic drainage

When purchasing a pair of compression socks, there are a few things you should keep in mind:

  • They have different levels of pressure, measured in mmHg
  • You likely have the wrong size if they feel too tight or painful

If you are flying for an extended period, consider wearing compression socks. But first, speak with your healthcare provider to decide if they are right for you. Compression socks may do more harm than good if not worn properly or if they do not fit correctly.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Treat Your Blood Clots, It Could Save Your Life

Lower limb vascular examination

A blood clot is a clump of blood that is in a gelatinous, solid state. Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a serious condition that occurs when a blood clot forms in a vein located deep inside your body. Deep vein blood clots typically form in your thigh or lower leg, but they can also develop in other areas of your body.

According to the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, symptoms of DVT only occur in about half of the people who have this condition. Common symptoms include:

  • swelling in your foot, ankle, or leg, usually on one side
  • cramping pain in your affected leg that usually begins in your calf
  • severe, unexplained pain in your foot and ankle
  • an area of skin that feels warmer than the skin on the surrounding areas
  • skin over the affected area turning pale or a reddish or bluish color

DVT occurs most commonly in people who are over 50 years in age. Certain conditions that alter how your blood moves through your veins can raise your risk of developing clots. These include:

  • being overweight, which puts more pressure on the veins in your legs and pelvis
  • having a family history of DVT
  • having a catheter placed in a vein
  • staying seated for a long time while you’re in a car or on a plane, especially if you already have at least one other risk factor

To better control and treat DVT, your doctor may prescribe medication and suggest daily routines to decrease your risk. DVT treatments focus on keeping the clot from growing. Your doctor might prescribe medications that thin your blood, making it harder for blood clots to appear. Another treatment method is wearing compression stockings that prevent swelling and lower your chance of developing clots.

You can lower your risk of having DVT by making a few lifestyle changes. These include keeping your blood pressure under control, giving up smoking, and losing weight if you’re overweight. Moving your legs around when you’ve been sitting for a while also helping to keep your blood flowing. Walking around after being on bed rest can prevent clots from forming. Take any blood thinners your doctor prescribes if you’re having surgery, as this can lower your chance of developing clots afterward.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.