Spring Gardening Tips for the Beginner

Senior Woman Gardening

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spring has sprung and so has our desire to commune with the “great outdoors!”  Flowers are blooming everywhere and you may want to put your green thumb to the test by starting your own garden.

Below are some simple gardening tips from Realsimple.com –

  • Know your geographic area
  • Test your soil
  • Start with “easy” plants
  • Put together a plan
  • Keep a journal
  • Set a Calendar
  • Remember when to water and when not to

Since gardening should be a stress relieving process, don’t be too hard on yourself if you don’t see results right away. With proper care and maintenance, your garden will grow.

For these and other great, simple gardening tips visit – https://www.realsimple.com/home-organizing/gardening/outdoor/gardening-101

 

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Back Pain

back pain-653834536Back pain is a common health condition that affects approximately 80% of people living in the United States at some point in their lives.

Although back pain can occur at any age, incidents are more common in people 35 years old and older. This may be due to the degeneration of the bones and discs in our spine over time.

Contributors to back pain can vary by circumstance or by preexisting health conditions such as:

  • Obesity
  • Injury
  • Pregnancy
  • Arthritis
  • Improper lifting
  • Osteoporosis
  • Occupation

Back pain may be caused when there is muscle or ligament strain, bulging or ruptured discs or skeletal irregularities.

Back pain can be mild or severe.  Symptoms may include a stabbing pain, muscle ache, pain that radiates down your leg or limited flexibility.

If these symptoms are continuous or become unbearable, it is advised that you see a doctor as soon as possible.  Your doctor will assess your level of pain, your range in mobility and investigate possible causes for your pain.  He or she may perform X rays, nerve studies, MRI or CT scans, bone scans or blood tests to help diagnose and treat the problem. Treatment may include medication, applying heat or ice compresses, physical therapy or surgery.

Jamaica Hospital Medical Center Center offers an Interventional Pain Management Practice, to schedule an appointment, please call 718-206-7246.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Break Free from Osteoporosis by Learning How to Prevent and Manage the Disease.

Spinal Fracture

Osteoporosis is a disease that weakens the bones, making them more susceptible to breaking. Approximately 10 million Americans have osteoporosis and another 44 million have an increased risk, due to poor bone density. In fact, one in two women and one in four men will break a bone due to osteoporosis in their lifetime.

To raise awareness about this disease, May has been designated as National Osteoporosis Month. The National Osteoporosis Foundation (NOF) and Jamaica Hospital Medical Center want everyone to “Break Free from Osteoporosis” by learning how to prevent and manage the disease.

According to the NOF, the keys to combatting osteoporosis are diet, exercise, and lifestyle. Recommendations include:

  • Get plenty of calcium and vitamin D in your diet
  • Quit smoking and limit alcohol consumption
  • Participate in weight bearing and muscle strengthening exercises on a regular basis

To emphasize the importance of physical activity for optimal bone health, the NOF is issuing the Jumping Jack Challenge. Beginning May 1, a challenge is being issued to all children and their parents and extended families to videotape themselves doing 10 jumping jacks in less than 10 seconds and posting it on social media with the hashtag #JumpingJackChallenge.

Through this effort, the NOF wants to stress the importance of building strong bones and maintaining bone strength throughout your life.

Jamaica Hospital supports the NOF’s campaign against osteoporosis. We offer bone densitometry testing in our Women’s Health Center. For more information, or to schedule an appointment, please call 7180-206-3276.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

The History of Allergies

Young girl in autumn park blowing nose. Standing in park in warm clothing.Though allergic reactions have been documented in ancient Greek and Roman history, the modern era of the study of allergies really began in the 1800’s when hay fever was described by Dr. John Bostock in 1819. This continues to be one of the most common allergic reactions, affecting approximately 15 million people in the United States.

In 1869 the first skin test for allergies was described when a scientist placed pollen into a small cut in the skin and watched for a reaction.

The concept of immunotherapy, which is building up the immune system through the administration of injections to help people cope with their allergies, was introduced in 1914.

Antihistamines, medications that would help the body respond better to allergic reactions became more widely used in the late 1930’s.  They helped by lessening the body’s reaction to allergens.

In 1948 corticosteroids were first used to treat asthma and allergic reactions. They worked on reducing the inflammation that would be caused by the allergens.

The discovery of mast cells in 1953 helped to identify what caused allergies to set off the immune response of the body. In 1963 IgE antibodies were discovered and this further helped to identify what set into motion the chain reaction within the body leading to the release of histamine and allergic reactions.

Professor Samuelson won the Nobel Prize in Medicine and Physiology in the early 1980’s for his work with leukotrines which cause asthma allergy and inflammatory responses to foreign substances.

In present day, there are several methods used to test for allergies and various treatment options are available to minimize a person’s reactions to allergens. These developments have been made possible due to research and discoveries over the years.

If you would like to be tested for allergies or discuss the best course of treatment, please call Jamaica Hospital at 718-206-6742

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Nat’l Stroke Awareness Month – Think F.A.S.T!

lightbulb brainstorming creative idea abstract icon on business hand.

May is National Stroke Awareness Month and in honor of that, Jamaica Hospital Medical Center (JHMC) would like to discuss how you can recognize the warning signs of having a stroke.

The easiest way to recognize the warning signs of a stroke is to think F.A.S.T. :

F- Face Drooping: If one side of the person’s face is drooping, ask them if their face feels numb and ask them to smile.   You should be concerned if they are unable to smile or their smile is uneven.

A- Arm weakness:  Does the individual’s arm feel numb or weak? Ask them to raise both arms and watch to see if one arm drifts downward.

S- Speech difficulty: If the person is trying to speak and they are difficult to understand or their speech is slurred, ask them to say a simple sentence, such as “my name is Jane,” repeatedly.

T- Time to call 9-1-1:  You should never wait more than five minutes to call 9-1-1 if someone is displaying these warning signs.

Additional symptoms of a stroke are:

  • Sudden confusion
  • Severe headaches
  • Blurred vision
  • Dizziness
  • Sudden loss of coordination

Stroke is one of the leading causes of death and long-term disability in the United States.  Eighty percent of strokes are preventable and by spotting these warning signs and acting quickly, the severity of a stroke can be reduced drastically.

If someone you know is exhibiting the warning signs of a stroke, call 9-1-1 for help immediately. If you are interested in finding out if you are at risk for a stroke, you can make an appointment with the Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center.  Call 718-206-7001 for an appointment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Jet Lag and Sleep

jet lag Jet lag can profoundly affect sleep and alertness.  This sleep disorder occurs when your body’s internal clock (circadian rhythms), which tells you when to sleep, becomes imbalanced after traveling to different time zones.

According to the National Sleep Foundation, when a person travels to a new time zone their “circadian rhythms are slow to adjust and remain on their original biological schedule for several days. This results in our bodies telling us it is time to sleep, when it’s actually the middle of the afternoon, or it makes us want to stay awake when it is late at night.”

Jet lag can lead to daytime fatigue, gastrointestinal problems, mood changes, a general unwell feeling, headaches, mild depression, insomnia and difficulty staying alert and concentrating.   These symptoms generally appear within a day or two of travel and can worsen the longer you travel and the more time zones you cross.

There are several ways to combat or minimize the effects of jet lag.  Here are a few you can try:

  • Avoid alcohol the day before your flight and during your flight.
  • Get plenty of rest before you fly.
  • Avoid caffeine or other caffeinated beverages before or while traveling.
  • Drink lots of water.
  • Wear sunglasses during your flight.
  • Move around the plane on long flights.
  • Adapt immediately to the schedule of your destination. While it may be tempting to sleep during the day after your arrival, it is advised that you stay up and active and expose your body to sunlight.
  • Avoid heavy meals upon arrival to your destination.

Symptoms of jet lag are mostly temporary and typically last a few days; however, if you are a frequent flyer they may become more severe. You can speak with your doctor or a sleep specialist who may recommend treatments such as light therapy, melatonin supplements or prescription medication.

To schedule an appointment with a sleep specialist at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718- 206-5916.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.