The Many Benefits of Garlic

Looking for a wonder drug that can:

ThinkstockPhotos-469904627• Lower your blood pressure and cholesterol? Check
• Boost your immune system? Check
• Control you diabetes? Check
• Improve your digestive and respiratory system? Check

What is this new, breakthrough drug? It’s not a medication at all; in fact you can find it at your local grocery store. It’s garlic!

Garlic is a plant that is used in many cultures for both culinary and medical purposes for hundreds of years. Eaten on its own, or more commonly used as an ingredient in many tasty dishes, garlic contains allicin, which is known to have anti-oxidant, anti-viral, and anti-bacterial properties.

Garlic has been shown to lower blood pressure by relaxing vein and artery walls. This action helps keep platelets from clumping together and improves blood flow, thereby reducing the risk of stroke. Garlic also decreases the levels of cholesterol and triglycerides, substances that increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases. Studies suggest that regularly eating garlic helps lower blood pressure and controls blood sugar and cholesterol levels.

This popular herb may also improve immunity by stimulating some of the body’s natural immune cells. Studies suggest that garlic may help prevent breast, bladder, skin, stomach, and colon cancer. Garlic’s antibacterial properties also make it a wonderful anti-viral and decongestant to prevent and combat colds, coughs, and upper respiratory tract infections. In addition, Garlic is often used to treat many other common maladies such as ear infections, toothaches, and treatment for warts and athlete’s foot.

Garlic can be digested either cooked or in raw form (but only in small amounts). If you do not like the taste of garlic there are also powdered or caplet forms. Your doctor can recommend which form of garlic is best for you.

For most people, consuming garlic does not cause any serious side effects if taken in moderation, but it can cause heartburn or stomach irritation if taken in excess. Due to its blood thinning properties, individuals taking anti-coagulant medications should speak with their doctor before increasing their daily garlic intake.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

The Importance of Wound Care as a Diabetic

Cuts and scrapes may not seem like a big deal for most people but for diabetics, healing can often become complicated due to their immune systems becoming compromised. For diabetics, careful monitoring of healing wounds is important to prevent bigger health issues down the line.

If you’re a diabetic, try these helpful tips to prevent a small problem from becoming more complicated:

  • Should you get aThinkstockPhotos-486206293 (1) cut, treat it immediately. Cleanse the affected area with soap and water daily. Dry the area well after washing, and apply an antibiotic ointment to keep the site germ-free. Skin injuries generally heal within two weeks, but cuts may take up to three weeks to heal in people with diabetes. Anything beyond that is excessive, and you should have your physician look at it again.
  • Keep pressure off the wound. “Make sure you’re not stepping directly on your wound,” says Dr. Andrew Rubin, Podiatrist at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center. “A podiatrist can help you fabricate a pad so you’re not stepping on it. Pressure can increase the time it takes to heal,” he added.
  • Be aware of the signs of an infection. Symptoms can include pain, redness, or warmth at the site of the infection. Drainage is another sign of an infection. Don’t ignore any of these signs. Get treatment promptly.

Remember that even a small scrape can become serious if you don’t take proper care of it. Left untreated, wounds can lead to an amputation in the most serious of cases. Taking good care of yourself is an important step toward preventing wounds.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

What Happens During A Diabetic Coma

56570286 diabetic comaA diabetic coma results from either very high or very low blood glucose levels. This is a life-threatening complication which causes the patient to fall into a state of unconsciousness. The coma is reversible if treated immediately, but if left untreated they may receive permanent brain damage or potentially die. There are three main types of diabetic comas:  severe hypoglycemia, diabetic ketoacidosis and diabetic hyperosmolar. Each type of coma can be brought on by excessive food intake, failure to take the proper doses of medication, trauma, illegal drug use, alcohol consumption or infection.

Hypoglycemia occurs when the body has insufficient glucose. If the brain does not have enough glucose, it cannot function properly which later causes you to pass out.  Diabetic Ketoacidosis is common amongst people with type 1 diabetes and is triggered by the build-up of ketones. Ketones build up when sugar levels are too low and the body begins to burn fat for energy. Diabetic hyperosmolar occurs when your blood sugar is dangerously high, causing your blood to get thick and syrupy.  Your body will try to get rid of the excess sugar by passing it in urine. This will cause frequent urination that can lead to dehydration.

There are several symptoms that will alert you if your sugar levels are dangerously high or low:

  • Fatigue
  • Sudden and extreme hunger
  • Frequent urination
  • Fruity-smelling breath
  • Shaking or nervousness
  • Irregular heartbeat
  • Confusion

If you are experiencing these symptoms check your blood glucose levels right away and seek immediate medical attention. The best way to avoid diabetic comas is through prevention and managing your diabetes. You can manage your diabetes by checking your blood sugar regularly, exercising, sticking to your recommended diet, staying hydrated and taking the proper doses of medication. For more information on diabetes management and early prevention Jamaica Hospital offers a free diabetes prevention program, to sign up please call 718-206-7088.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Type 1 Diabetes- What you should know?

78160636_T1DDiabetes is on the rise and what has significantly increased is the rate of type 1 diabetes (T1D), formerly known as “juvenile” or “juvenile onset” diabetes. The Center for Disease Control (CDC) has found that more than 13,000 children and young people are diagnosed with type 1 diabetes each year.

T1D is often first diagnosed in children, teenagers, or young adults. However, people may develop T1D at any age. The exact cause of T1D is unknown, there is no cure and it cannot be outgrown. In most cases of T1D, the body’s own immune system, which normally fights harmful bacteria and viruses, mistakenly destroys the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. Doctors believe genetics may play a role in this process, and exposure to certain environmental factors, such as viruses, may trigger the disease.

The good news is that it can be controlled with insulin therapy, exercise and diet. Are you, or a family member, experiencing any of the following symptoms?
• Increased thirst
• Frequent urination
• Bedwetting in children who previously didn’t wet the bed during the night
• Extreme hunger
• Unintended weight loss
• Irritability and other mood changes
• Fatigue and weakness
• Blurred vision
• In females, frequent vaginal yeast infections

A simple blood test can identify type 1 diabetes. Be sure to consult with a physician if you or a family member is experiencing any of the above symptoms by contacting Jamaica Hospital’s Ambulatory Care Center at 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.