History of Dentistry

Dentistry is one of the world’s oldest medical professions. As early as 5000BC tooth decay was described as being caused by dental worms and this belief was not proven false until the 1700’s.
In 166 – 200 AD Italy the Etruscans began to work on dental repair with crowns made from gold as well as bridgework.  The Chinese began using silver paste to repair cavities in the 700’s. The first organized group of dentists were described in France in the 1200’s and were actually barbers who in addition to cutting hair, had been trained to work on teeth.
Beginning in the 1700’s developments in dentistry were coming along at a quicker pace. In 1723 Pierre Fauchard, considered to be the father of modern dentistry wrote  one of the first complete books on dental practice. In the early 1800’s porcelain teeth began to be commercially manufactured to serve as replacement teeth. In 1839 vulcanized rubber was first used as a base for false teeth. Ether was first used as an anesthetic in 1846.
During the late 1800’s dental tools were being improved upon. The first mechanical drill was commercially manufactured in 1871, the first hydraulic dental chair was manufactured in 1877 and in 1895 x-rays were coming into practice for dentistry.  In 1905 the local anesthetic novocain was developed.
Oral hygiene and prevention of tooth decay became popular in the 1900’s. Toothpaste in tubes became popular with the general public as opposed to powders and pastes that had been used previously. Cities across the country began to fluoridate the water supply to aid in the prevention of cavities, and the first nylon toothbrush was manufactured.  High speed air driven drills which were developed in the late 1950’s made visits to the dentist less painful.
Dentistry is constantly evolving with new techniques being developed to make dental care better for both the dentist and the patient. If you would like to schedule an appointment with a dentist at Jamaica Hospital, please call 718-206-6980.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Can Excessive Teeth Whitening Be Harmful ?

Woman holding up tooth whitening chart, smiling, portrait, close-up

Woman holding up tooth whitening chart, smiling, portrait, close-up

Many people wish to have that “Movie Star”  smile with bright white teeth. To get that perfect smile many people will purchase teeth whitening kits to use at home. Teeth whitening products use a chemical that in effect bleaches the outer layer of the teeth. Teeth that are yellow in color tend to respond best to this type of treatment. Teeth that are brownish in color or those that have been stained by long term use of tobacco, caffeine, wine or by the use of certain medications may not respond as well.
If used correctly, teeth whitening can be effective for many people. There are however risk s involved if the products are not used properly. Risks can include teeth sensitivity and damage to the roots of the teeth. Excessive teeth whitening can lead to the edges of your teeth becoming permanently bluish and translucent.
It is strongly advised that anyone considering whitening their teeth consult with a dentist first. It is also advisable to have your teeth professionally cleaned prior to home whitening which may remove some of the material that is staining the teeth.
If you would like to schedule an appointment with a dentist at Jamaica Hospital’s Dental Center, please call 718-206-6982.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

CAVITY PREVENTION TIPS

Sweet black girl patient showing in mirror her teeth

According to the American Dental Association (ADA) parents should instill in their children the importance of good oral hygiene at an early age, ensuring that this ritual will continue when they become adults.

 It is suggested that good oral hygiene be factored together when children are taught how to keep themselves healthy.

The ADA provides these age-by-age tips:

Babies, Toddlers and Pre-School

  • After each feeding, clean the baby’s gums with a clean wet gauze pad or washcloth
  • When teeth start to appear, brush them with a child’s size toothbrush and plain water
  • Begin flossing when at least two teeth begin to touch
  • Start dental visits by the child’s first birthday and make visits regularly
  • Brush teeth of children over age two with a pea-sized amount of fluoride toothpaste and be sure to floss daily
  • Supervise your children while they are brushing their teeth to prevent them from swallowing the toothpaste

School-Age Children and Adolescents

  • Until they are six or seven years old, continue to brush your children’s teeth twice a day with a child size toothbrush and a pea-sized amount of fluoride toothpaste
  • Continue to assist with flossing as needed
  • By age six or seven, children should be able to brush their own teeth twice a day but may require supervision until about age 10 or 11
  • Ask the dentist about dental sealants, protective plastic coating that can be applied to chewing surfaces of the back teeth where decay often starts
  • Remind your adolescent about practicing good oral hygiene

 If your child has dental problems, you should visit a dentist as soon as possible. If you would like to schedule an appointment for your child at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Dental Center call 718-206-6980

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Smoking and Dental Care

cigarettesandteethpicWith smoking, we tend to focus on the effects it may have on the lungs or the heart. However, we don’t focus on the health effects it may have on other parts of the body including your oral health.

The American Cancer Society states that smokers are six times more likely than non-smokers to develop cancers of the mouth, lips, tongue, and throat. In addition, smoking can cause many serious problems for teeth and oral structures. It can interfere with the normal function of gum tissue cells; this can make smokers more susceptible to infections, gum disease, or even periodontal disease. The problem can be further exacerbated when proper dental health care is not followed. The excess of harmful chemicals in cigarette smoke makes smokers twice more likely to suffer tooth loss than non-smokers.

Keep your winning smile and kick the smoking habit. For help to quit smoking, please contact Jamaica Hospital’s smoking cessation support group at 718-206-8494.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

History of Dentures

Dentures isolated on a white background.

Dentures have been around for thousands of years. It is believed that they were first used around 700 B.C. by the Etruscans in ancient Italy. These were made from either human teeth or animal teeth.

Until the 1,800’s the most commonly used material for making dentures was ivory that came from elephants, walruses, and hippos. In fact, it has been found that the first U.S. President George Washington’s dentures were also made of ivory, although many have mistakenly believed they were made of wood.

In the late 1700’s a man by the name of Alexis Duchâteau crafted the first porcelain dentures, however these were not popular as they were not sturdy and often chipped. People were also not happy with the fact that they were too white and didn’t look real.

In the 1820’s an English silversmith named Claudius Ash developed a set of dentures that were made of porcelain teeth mounted on 18-karat gold plates, with gold springs and swivels. This was a large improvement to the dentures that had been made previously.

In the 1850’s craftsmen began to make dentures from a hardened rubber called vulcanite into which porcelain teeth were inserted. During the twentieth century other materials came in to use such as acrylic resin and plastics.

Jamaica Hospital’s Department of Dentistry provides the community with the latest and innovative technologies in dental care.  Our inter-disciplinary staff is specially trained to provide the highest quality care and is dedicated to making your visit as comfortable as possible.

If you would like to schedule an appointment with a dentist at Jamaica Hospital, please call 718-206-6982.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Importance of a Back to School Dental Check Up

child at dentist -469174173When planning your child’s return to school in the fall, as parents you have a list of supplies and purchases that need to me be made to make sure they have everything they need to have a great school year. While planning your child’s entrance back to school, make sure you schedule an appointment for your child’s dental check-up.

Healthy teeth are important to your child’s overall health. Did you know that a correlation between oral infections and diabetes, asthma, heart disease and obesity has been identified?  According to the National Institutes of Health, 20% to 30% of children and adolescents in the United States have chronic health conditions due to a lack of good oral hygiene.

Chronic illness may interfere with a child’s ability to succeed in school.  There has been statistical evidence that shows a direct link between chronic illness and missed school time that can lead to a decline in your child’s school performance.

Some ways to promote healthy teeth in your child are:

  • Brush teeth regularly – At the age of 3, you can begin to teach your child proper brushing techniques by using a drop of fluoride toothpaste on a soft-bristled toothbrush.
  • Avoid Sugar – Ingesting sweets brings about an acidity that causes decay-producing bacteria. A sugary snack can lead to a mouth full of cavities.
  • Regular dental treatments – Your child should see a dentist around the time of his/her first birthday and then regularly thereafter. It is important to establish relationship of trust between your child and their dentist.

If you feel anxious about a visit to the dentist, try not to convey those feelings to your child.  Encourage your child to discuss any fears about visiting a dentist and be reassuring that the dental professional is there to help them.

If you are interested in making an appointment for your child to see a dentist, the Department of Dentistry at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center provides valuable services to the community. For an appointment call, 718-206-6980.

 

 

 

 

When planning your child’s return to school after the summer break, make certain that scheduling an appointment for a dental checkup is on your list of priorities.

Healthy teeth are important to your child’s overall health. Did you know that there is a correlation between oral infections and diabetes, asthma, heart disease and obesity?  According to the National Institutes of Health, 20% to 30% of children and adolescents in the United States have chronic health conditions due to a lack of good oral hygiene.

Chronic illness may interfere with a child’s ability to succeed in school.  There has been statistical evidence that shows a direct link between chronic illness and missed school time that can lead to a decline in your child’s school performance.

Some ways to promote healthy teeth in your child are:

  • Brushing teeth regularly – At the age of 3, you can begin to teach your child proper brushing techniques by using a drop of fluoride toothpaste on a soft-bristled toothbrush.
  • Avoiding sugar – Ingesting sweets can produce acids that cause decay-producing bacteria to develop.
  • Scheduling regular dental treatments – Your child should see a dentist around the time of his/her first birthday and then regularly thereafter. It is important to establish relationship of trust between your child and their dentist.

If you feel anxious about a visit to the dentist, try not to convey those feelings to your child.  Encourage them to discuss any fears about visiting a dentist and be reassuring that the dental professional is there to help.

If you are interested in making an appointment for your child to see a dentist, the Department of Dentistry at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center provides valuable services to the community. For an appointment, please call 718-206-6980.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Cavity Prevention for Children

Toothpaste Dental cavities can be prevented for most children. To keep those pearly whites pearly it takes being mindful about eating, drinking and brushing habits along with being knowledgeable about your child’s water supply. Remember, every time we eat or drink something that contains sugar or starches, bacteria in our mouth uses the sugar and starch to produce acids. These acids begin to eat away at the tooth’s enamel. Our saliva can help fight off this acid attack unless there are a lot of foods high in starch and sugar in your diet. That’s why it’s important to keep an eye on how often your children eat as well as what they eat.

A key source in strengthening teeth against cavities is fluoride. Brushing with fluoride toothpaste is important for preventing cavities. Most bottled water does not contain enough fluoride to prevent tooth decay. If your child drinks only bottled water, speak with a dentist about whether your child needs additional fluoride in the form of a vitamin, varnish, or gel.

Young children cannot get their teeth clean by themselves. For children aged two to six, it is recommended that an adult puts the toothpaste on the brush. Use only a pea-sized amount of fluoride toothpaste.Try brushing your child’s teeth first, then let him/her finish.  Until they are seven or eight years old, you will need to help your child brush.

Encourage your child to spit out the toothpaste rather than swallow it. Children under six years old tend to swallow much of the toothpaste on their brush. If children regularly consume higher-than-recommended amounts of fluoride during the teeth-forming years (age eight and younger), their permanent teeth may develop white lines or flecks called dental fluorosis. Fluorosis is usually mild; in many cases, only a dental professional would notice it. (In children under age two, dental experts recommend that you do not use fluoride toothpaste unless directed by a dentist.)

It is recommended that children see their dentist every six months for regular check-ups and cavity prevention. To make an appointment at Jamaica Hospital, please call 718-206-6980.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Diabetes and Your Oral Health

ThinkstockPhotos-78748368Living with diabetes can affect your entire body and your mouth no exception. The good news however is that by effectively managing your blood sugar and practicing good oral hygiene habits, you can avoid diabetes-related problems to your teeth and gums.
Diabetes can take a toll on your mouth in the following ways:

• Tooth decay (cavities) – When bacteria in the mouth interact with sugars and starches found in the food we eat, it creates plaque, which destroys the enamel on our teeth and creates cavities. There are more sugars and starches in the mouths of diabetics because they have higher blood glucose levels, and are therefore more susceptible to tooth erosion and damage.

• Gum disease (gingivitis) – Diabetes reduces our bodies ability to fight bacteria, such as plaque. When plaque hardens on the gum line, it creates tartar, which can irritate the gums and cause swelling and bleeding. Gum disease can advance to a condition known as periodontitis, which can result in your teeth falling out.

• Thrush -People with diabetes who take antibiotics to combat infections are more likely to develop this fungal infection of the mouth and tongue, causing a burning sensation. This fungus thrives on the high levels of blood sugar found in the saliva of diabetics.

You can do a lot to avoid these problems, including:

• Manage your diabetes by monitoring your blood sugar and keeping it within your target     range

• Take good care of your mouth by brushing at least two times per day with a soft-bristled brush and floss once per day to help remove plaque.

• Schedule regular dental visits and make sure your dentist is aware that you have diabetes and provide him with your doctor’s contact information.

• Look out for early signs of gum disease such as redness, bleeding or swelling. Also alert your dentist of loose teeth or mouth pain.

• Quit smoking as it increases the risk of serious diabetic complications, including gum disease. Ask your doctor about ways to quit if you need help.

If you have diabetes and are experiencing problems with your teeth and gums, make an appointment with your dentist immediately. Jamaica Hospital operates a full-service dental facility on its main campus. For more information or to schedule an appointment, please call 718-206-6980.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

History of Toothpaste

Even in ancient times people were concerned with the health of their  teeth and gums. The first toothpaste was used by the Egyptians around 5000 BC.  It was made from the powder of ox hooves, burnt eggshells, pumice and water. There is also evidence that the ancient Greeks and Romans used crushed bones and oyster shells followed by the Chinese who favored ginseng, herbal mints and salt.
More modern versions of tooth cleaning products  were made in the mid 1800’s that combined soap, borax and  chalk. In those days toothpastes were mainly in powder form and were very abrasive which often damaged teeth.   The first toothpaste which came in a jar was developed in 1850 In the 1890’s  toothpaste  was introduced in tube form. Soap was still an important ingredient of toothpaste until the 1940’s when it was replaced by sodium lauryl sulphate . One of the major developments was the addition of fluoride in the 1950’s which inhibited tooth decay and is still a key component today.
To make an appointment with a dentist at Jamaica Hospital, please call 718-206-6980.Toothpaste

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.