Safety Tips for Hoverboards

Boy Doing Stunts on a SkateboardHoverboards are the hot new toy, but how safe are they? These self-balancing scooters are on the top of every kid’s (and some adult’s) list to Santa this year, but as these unregulated travel devices rise in popularity, so too have trips to the Emergency Department.

Hospital ERs across the country are reporting a series of injuries, from scrapes and contusions, to fractures and sprains, to even head injuries resulting from hoverboard accidents. These toys can reach maximum speeds of 15 miles an hour and falls from them can cause significant harm. All you have to do is go to You Tube, Twitter, or Instagram and type in #HoverBoardFalls to see how dangerous hover-boards can be if the rider (or parent, if the rider is a child) does not take proper precautions.

Hoverboard price and quality vary greatly so read online reviews from previous buyers before purchasing one. Also, because they are so new to the market, there are no national safety standards for hoverboards. Until regulations are in place, riders should follow the same safety guidelines they would for riding a bicycle, including wearing a helmet, elbow and knee pads, wrist guards and/or gloves.

Other tips to follow before getting on a hoverboard include carefully reading the instruction manual to learn how to properly operate it. Also make sure to adhere to all safety rules, including age and weight recommendations.

It is a good idea to have a “spotter” with you when you first attempt to ride your hover-board in case you fall. Lastly, riders should not use their hoverboards in the street or on public walkways to avoid seriously injuring themselves or others.

Like everything else, hoverboards can be a lot of fun if they are used responsibly. Happy and safe riding!

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

How “Annual” Is Your Annual Physical?

HypertesionThinkstockPhotos-477722758A.  Yearly

B. Bi-Yearly

C. When I don’t feel good

D. I don’t do doctors

 

An annual exam is a good way of tracking your health progress.  Some of the benefits are:

  • Primary prevention
  • To identify risk factors for common chronic diseases
  • To detect disease that has no apparent symptoms (secondary prevention)
  • A way for the doctor to counsel people to promote healthy behavior
  • To update clinical data since your last check-up
  • To enhance the relationship betweenyou and your doctor

If you are interested in scheduling an exam, Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center is centrally located and has convenient hours.  Call 718-206-7001 for an appointment.

 

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Kitchen Safety Tips This Holiday Season

As the holiday season approaches, the kitchen can become especially busy for many. During this time of year, we tend to host more family dinners, and holiday parties. With all this increased kitchen activity, safety can sometimes be overlooked.

ThinkstockPhotos-81754625While cooking-related injuries can take place any time of year, these incidents tend to increase in frequency around the holidays. Some of the injuries that take place in the kitchen include cuts, sprains and eye-related injuries, but the most common type of cooking-related injury are burns to the skin from hot liquids such as water, grease, or other substances.

Caution is the best practice for avoiding burns especially, while frying or boiling your favorite holiday foods. It is best to keep the flame at a reasonable level to avoid splatter burns when frying food. Also, be careful with your eyes while working in the kitchen as oil or hot water can cause irritation, injury or infection.

In addition to burns, hospitals also treat many people who suffered lacerations from knives while chopping or carving foods. Most injuries occur on the hand, knuckles or tips of the fingers. In some cases these injuries can result in stiches or even the loss of a digit. When using knives it is very important to use the right tool for the job. Don’t use a bread knife to carve a piece of meat or try to chop vegetables with a paring knife. It might sound odd, but always keep your knives sharpened. More kitchen injuries come from people using cutlery with dull blades than sharp ones.

Here are a few additional cooking safety tips:
• When chopping vegetables, slice downward and away from your body while keeping your fingers away from the blade.

• Never fry a turkey indoors or in a garage or other structure attached to a building. Be careful to follow specific thawing, preparation, and cooking temperature and timing instructions to avoid potential serious injury.

• Keep a fire extinguisher handy in the kitchen, and know how to use it.

• Never leave your food unattended while frying or grilling.

• Use a timer and routinely check whatever you’re cooking.

• Keep your cutting area well-lit and dry. Good lighting will help prevent an accidental cut of the finger and making sure your cutting surface is dry will prevent ingredients from slipping while chopping.

• Make sure to wear a mitten when you are grabbing food from the oven.

Jamaica Hospital’s Trauma Division recognizes that many of these injuries, accidents, and fatalities are preventable. Our Trauma Division is fully dedicated to reducing and preventing these injuries through community outreach, education and advocacy.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Avoid Trauma in the Water This Summer

When venturing into the water this summer, shark sightings or jelly fish stings shouldn’t be the only things you need to concern yourself with. Serious injuries can occur in the water and it is important to follow proper precautions.

Whether you are at the beach or in the pool this summer, follow these safety tips this summer to avoid water-related trauma.

AT THE SHORE
ThinkstockPhotos-477399152Heading to your favorite beach can be a lot of fun, but the ocean is very powerful. When venturing into the water, only swim in designated areas supervised by a lifeguard because dangerous rip currents can affect even the strongest of swimmers.

Know your environment before diving headfirst into waves or riding your surf or boogie board. Steep drop-offs or natural hazards such as sandbars or rocks can result in severe injuries to the head, neck and other parts of your body.

Lastly, even if you are close to the shore, be careful. Strong breaking waves can disrupt your footing and knock you over, causing severe injuries.

ON THE WATER
Jet skiing, water skiing, tubing, or boating are all fun water activities, but failing to follow the proper safety rules can be devastating. Last year, there were over 4,000 reported boating accidents, resulting in approximately 2,600 injuries and 560 deaths.

To avoid an accident, be sure to stay in navigable waters and never travel at excessive speeds. Also be sure to maintain plenty of distance between yourself and other boats, and be on the lookout for other people in the water. Failing to be aware of the rules can result in serious trauma or even death.

IN THE POOL
You don’t have to be at the beach or lake to experience a water-related trauma. Pools can also pose many opportunities for serious injury.

Be sure to secure your pool by surrounding it with a fence and self-latching gate. Place a safety cover on the pool or hot tub when not in use and remove any ladders or steps used for access. Consider installing a pool alarm that alerts you if anyone enters the pool.

Make sure the depth of the pool is clearly marked to avoid anyone diving into the shallow end. Also make sure the edge of the pool is clear of any objects that can be tripped over and be sure that no one runs along the edges of the pool. Slips and falls can result in severe head trauma.
OTHER TIPS
Regardless of whether you are at the pool or beach, mixing alcohol and participating in any kind or water-related activity is a bad idea.

Recommendations to minimize the chances of a serious injury include the usage of life jackets and other flotation devises whenever necessary. Enrolling in approved first aid and CPR courses are also beneficial and can save the life of someone you love.

Jamaica Hospital operates a Level 1 Trauma Center, the highest designation for trauma care. During the summer, the Trauma Center sees an increase in water-related traumatic injuries. Our entire trauma team wants our community to exercise caution to avoid injury.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Follow Proper Roadside Safety This Summer

As summer approaches, most Americans are beginning to plan vacation “road trips” to the beach, amusement parks, and other destinations. With more families on the road, the chances of roadside accidents increase as well. Jamaica Hospital’s Trauma Center wants to take this opportunity to advise motorists on what to do (and what not to do) if your car breaks down on the road.

ThinkstockPhotos-451193173Whether it’s a flat tire, dead battery, engine failure, or a fender bender, every year millions of Americans encounter some form of vehicle trouble. If you find yourself in one of these situations, responding appropriately and taking proper precautions can mean the difference between life and death. According to the Federal Highway Administration, 59,000 pedestrians are injured during roadway crashes every year, with roughly 4,000 people killed, accounting for 12% of traffic accidents.

Follow these tips to ensure proper roadside safety to avoid making a bad situation even worse:

• Know your location. Look for street signs, restaurants, mile markers, or other surrounding identifiers so when you call for help, it will arrive with minimal delay.

• If you get stuck, make sure your vehicle is as visible as possible. Put your hazard lights on immediately. If you have them in your trunk, use flares, reflective lights or brightly colored flags as well. Another trick to bring attention to your car is to lift the hood.

• If you are able to, get your car out of the line of traffic. Moving your car onto highway shoulders, medians, and exit ramps are all safer options than leaving it in the middle of the road. Never try to repair or assess damage to your car on a busy highway.

• Once you are away from traffic, the safest choice is to remain in your vehicle with your seatbelt fastened. This is a much better option than waiting outside your car for assistance. If you must get out of your car, make sure to get out on the side furthest from the flow of traffic.

• If you cannot get off the road, do not stay in your vehicle. Exit your car or truck with extreme caution and get to a safe, out-of-the-way location and wait for help to arrive.

Jamaica Hospital’s Trauma Department wants you to remember that if you encounter a roadside emergency, your well-being and that of your family should be your number one priority. Following proper roadside safety precautions and using good judgment will have a direct bearing on your personal safety.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

The First Ambulance at Jamaica Hospital

The first known ambulance at Jamaica Hospital was a horse drawn wagon that went in to service in 1902 and brought seriously ill patients to the hospital. As motorized vehicles became more widely available in the 1920’s, horse drawn wagons were eventually replaced, response times shortened and more lives could be saved. Jamaica Hospital now has a fleet of 8 ambulances that run 24/7 and that transport thousands of patients every year.First Ambulance

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Holiday Safety Tips

Decorating your home for the holidays is always so much fun, but did you know that each year an estimated 250 house fires nationwide are caused by faulty holiday lights? Here are some tips for keeping your home safe this year:

• Before stringing holiday lights always check the sockets to ensure they are not broken or cracked.

• Never use indoor lights for outdoors use.

• Turn off the indoor tree lights before going to bed or whenever you leave the house.

• Do not connect more than three sets of lights to each extension cord.

• Make sure that your lights have safety labels and are made by reputable companies.

• Do not use candles on or near a tree.

• Place your tree and gift wrapped presents away from sources of heat such as fireplaces.

• Make sure that your tree is secured firmly to its base so that it can’t tip over.

• Artificial trees should be fire resistant.

• Always keep a fire extinguisher handy and accessible in case of emergency.

Don’t ruin your holiday by being careless. A little common sense and taking some precautions will ensure a joyous holiday for you and your family.christnmas safety

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.