Social Anxiety Disorder

Social anxiety disorder, also known as social phobia, affects approximately 15 million Americans. It is characterized by an intense fear of being rejected or thought of negatively in a social situation. It can cause extreme anxiety, feeling self-conscious and a sense of being embarrassed in daily social interactions.

Social anxiety most commonly starts in the teenage years and continues into adulthood. Less than five percent of people who experience social anxiety seek treatment within the first year after onset, and over a third of the people with this condition seek treatment after 10 years of experiencing it.

Some signs and symptoms of social anxiety include:

  • Fear of interacting with strangers
  • Avoidance of speaking in public
  • Anxiety of being in unfamiliar places
  • Blushing
  • Dizziness
  • Trembling
  • Upset stomach
  • Avoidance of eye contact
  • Avoidance of school
  • Inability to us a public restroom
  • Inability to eat in public

Some of the factors that can cause social anxiety include:

  • Having family members with this disorder
  • Having had negative experiences such as childhood abuse, bullying, or public humiliation
  • Being shy or timid
  • Meeting new people
  • Having a physical appearance that draws unwanted attention

Social anxiety, if not identified and treated early, can lead to low self-esteem, substance abuse, depression, a lack of social skills, isolation from others, and even thoughts of suicide.

If you suspect that you or someone you know has social anxiety disorder, it is suggested that speaking with a physician or a therapist can be helpful. If you would like to schedule an appointment with a physician at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

November is Diabetes Awareness Month

The month of November has been designated Diabetes Awareness Month by the American Diabetes Association (ADA). Diabetes affects nearly 30 million people in the United States which is ten percent of the total population. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention more than 1 in 3 adults in the United States has prediabetes. This is the equivalent of 88 million people who are at risk of developing type II diabetes during their lifetime. The ADA states that 1 in 5 people in the United States who has diabetes isn’t aware that they even have it.

There is no cure for diabetes but there are many ways for people who have been diagnosed with the disease to live long, healthy lives if it is controlled properly. Learning to live with diabetes is one of the most important components for managing the disease. Proper nutrition, regular physical activity, monitoring blood sugar daily and taking medication to control diabetes are some of the ways complications can be prevented.

Uncontrolled diabetes can lead to many complications. It is the leading cause of blindness, non-traumatic amputations, kidney disease and also increases the risk for heart attacks.

It is also important to have regular medical exams to manage diabetes successfully. To schedule an appointment with a physician at Flushing Hospital Medical Center please call 718-670-5486.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

How to Tell the Difference Between a Bad Cold, Bronchitis, and Pneumonia

That dreaded time of year is here, it is cold season.  In the United States, this season starts around September and typically lasts until March or April.

Chances are like many, you may catch a cold. If you do, you may display symptoms that include sneezing, scratchy or sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, coughing, congestion or a low-grade fever. These symptoms are normal but can worsen when left untreated and may cause serious illnesses such as bronchitis or pneumonia to develop.

It is important to know when your condition is worsening. There are several signs that can help you to recognize when your common cold has become something more.

Here are some symptoms of bronchitis to look out for:

  • A cold that persists for two weeks or more
  • Shortness of breath or wheezing
  • Coughs that produce thick clear, white, green or yellow mucous or blood
  • Rapid breathing
  • Soreness of the chest

Pneumonia can develop after having a serious cold or flu. Symptoms can be mild or severe depending on factors such as age and your state of health. The symptoms of pneumonia can include:

  • Violent coughing spasms that produce very little mucous
  • Coughs with bloody or yellow or greenish mucous
  • Fever
  • Sharp or stabbing chest pain when you breathe deeply or cough
  • Loss of appetite
  • Fatigue
  • Clammy skin or excessive sweating
  • Chills
  • Muscle aches

If your cold persists longer than two weeks and you are experiencing these symptoms, it is important that you contact your doctor as soon as possible. In severe cases, pneumonia can be life threatening.

To schedule an appointment with a physician at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

A Delicious Fall Recipe for Roast Pork and Sweet Potatoes

Here is a Fall season recipe from the Food Network for roast pork and sweet potatoes that we think you will enjoy https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/food-network-kitchen/roast-pork-and-sweet-potatoes-3363155

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Mental Health Awareness Week

Every year, millions of people in the United States are found to be living with a mental illness. To address this issue, in 1990, Congress designated the first full week of October as Mental Illness Awareness Week. The reason for this designation is to bring attention to the fact that mental illness not only affects the person who has it, but also their family, friends and others that they interact with.

.Mental illness affects one in twenty people in the Untied States each year and for one in five of these people it is very serious. Less than half of the people with mental illness in the nation are receiving adequate treatment.

The National Alliance on Mental Illness, the organization that has advocated for Mental Illness Awareness Week, hopes to bring attention to this serious issue through their 2023 campaign “Together we care. Together we share”. The objective is to raise awareness of mental health issues and resources by engaging communities and encouraging people to share their experiences.

Jamaica Hospital Medical Center has a comprehensive Mental Health Department. If you would like to schedule an appointment, please call 718-206-5575.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Reiki

Reiki is considered to be a complementary medicine healing technique that was developed in the early 1900’s by Mikao Usui. It is a translation of two Japanese words, “rei” which  means universal and “ki” which means the vital life energy. It is  a healing modality that helps a person to  feel relaxed and less stressed.

Each reiki session takes approximately 50 minutes. The patient lays fully clothed on a massage table and the person who is performing reiki places their hands either directly on or just above the patient’s body. This allows for the transfer of energy from the practitioner’s hands to the patient. This transfer of energy increases the flow  and balance of energy through the body in order to help it heal.

The benefits of reiki include:

  • Brings on a meditative state
  • Promotes post-surgery healing
  • Increases the immune system
  • Diminishes pain
  • Promotes natural self-healing

Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Integrative Health Center offers reiki to our patients. If you would like to schedule an appointment, please call 718-206-6914.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Employee Spotlight Shines on Kim Shelley

This month we are proud to shine our Employee Spotlight on Kim Shelley, Manager of the Admitting Department.

Kim has been working at Jamaica Hospital for 31 years. She is a native of Queens, having grown up in Richmond Hill and now residing in Belle Harbor with her husband in a home overlooking the beautiful beach.  Living at the beach gives her a pleasant way to decompress.

In her free time, she enjoys photography, and has become the official photographer at family get-togethers. She also takes beautiful sunrise photos overlooking the beach. Kim likes to listen to music and podcasts, and watch movies. She also enjoys traveling regularly to Colombia, South America to visit family. Other locations she has visited are Europe, Greece, Scandinavia and many destinations in the US.  Some places that she hopes to get to visit one day are Spain, Australia, and New Zealand.

Dining out is one of Kim’s favorite things to do,  especially at all the diverse local restaurants near her home. She likes to try new types of food if they aren’t very spicey. She comes from a long line of Mets baseball fans, and she considers herself a fan of the team as well. Family and friends are very important to her and she likes spending time with them.

Kim considers herself lucky to work at Jamaica Hospital because of all the wonderful colleagues she has met there, many of whom have become lifelong friends. She enjoys the work that she does and takes pride in helping the thousands of patients who pass through her department each year. We look forward to having Kim continue to work for many years in the future.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Fall Recipe – Skillet Rosemary Chicken

Weeknight, fall meals call for recipes that are easy to prepare  and that don’t require much cooking time.   Here is a recipe from the Food Network that we recommend for skillet rosemary chicken.

https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/food-network-kitchen/skillet-rosemary-chicken-recipe-2104751

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

End of Summer Recipe for Shrimp and Avocado Salad

End of summer evenings call for recipes  that are easy to prepare  and that don’t require much cooking time.   Here is a recipe from the Food Network that we recommend for shrimp and avocado salad.

https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/food-network-kitchen/shrimp-and-avocado-salad-3362888

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Three Essential Back to School Tips

Although your child may be exposed to several health risks as the new school year begins, you can help them stay healthy by following these tips:

Getting your child vaccinated: Ensuring that your child receives their recommended immunizations is a simple, effective way to keep them from getting sick. In fact, many schools require students to receive their immunizations in order to attend classes.

Hand-washing and sanitization: Hand-washing and sanitizing alone go a long way toward staying in school; according to the Centers for Disease Control, hand-washing can reduce the risk of respiratory illness by up to 21%. Following and promoting sanitary practices at home may make it easier for them to continue these practices while at school.

Creating a mentally healthy environment: Physical illness isn’t the only health risk your child may face in class. Stress, bullying, or even issues like undiagnosed ADD or ADHD can negatively impact their mental health and their ability to stay focused on their studies. Staying aware of the causes of mental health issues, creating a supportive environment at home, encouraging your child to maintain healthy routines, and helping them learn effective coping mechanisms can make it easier for them to maintain a healthy state of mind throughout the school year.

Visit Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center to get your child the medical help they need to stay engaged with their studies. You can also visit our Psychiatry Department for help addressing mental health challenges that arise before, during, or after the school year.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.