Jamaica Hospital Celebrates Infection Prevention Week

October 14th marks the beginning of Infection Prevention week, an annual effort to highlight the importance of infection prevention among healthcare professionals, administrators, legislators, and consumers.

Over the past 32 years, infection prevention week has gained a great deal of recognition around the world and patients are now benefiting from the safer healthcare practices that are shared during this week-long observance. The theme of Infection Prevention week this year is Protecting Patients Everywhere. 

Jamaica Hospital Medical Center supports the prevention of infection among our patients, visitors, and staff. To help eliminate the spread of bacterial infection we urge every person who steps foot inside our hospital to learn about the best ways to protect themselves and others.

Below is a list of ways patients can reduce the risk of infection provided by the Association of Professionals in Infection Control (APIC):

  • Speak up for your care
  • Clean your hands often
  • Ask about safe injection practices
  • Ask to have your room cleaned
  • Ask questions about your medications
  • Ask if you should shower before having surgery
  • Ask each day if you still need a catheter
  • Ask about vaccinations so you stay healthy
  • Learn about healthcare associated infections

Jamaica Hospital is proud to share that we have made great strides in our infection prevention and control initiatives.  We are currently at 97% hand hygiene compliance, which has led to very low hospital-acquired infection rates including urinary catheter infections, surgical site infections, and bloodstream infections.

Jamaica Hospital knows that by practicing good hand hygiene and adhering to other patient safety initiatives as well as continuing to educate our patients, we are creating an even safer environment for our patients, staff and visitors.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

EATING FOR ENERGY

If you conducted a survey, most people will tell you that between the hours of 3:00PM and 4:00PM each day, a feeling of fatigue may set in which makes them feel less productive.

This is typically the time of day when they may reach for a less healthy choice of food or beverage to “perk-up.”

Many of their snack options are laden with sugar and fat and have no nutritional value.  There are several healthy foods available that give us both a boost and essential nutrients.

Some healthy foods that have been proven to help raise energy levels are:

Bananas – Bananas contain carbohydrates, potassium and vitamin B6, all proven to boost energy levels in your body.

  • Sweet Potatoes – Sweet potatoes contain fiber and complex carbs, as well as manganese, which can help break down nutrients in order to produce energy.
  • Brown Rice – Brown Rice is less processed than white rice so it retains more fiber, vitamins and minerals. It also has a low glycemic index and could help regulate blood sugar levels to help maintain steady energy levels all day long.
  • Coffee – Coffee is rich in caffeine. Caffeine quickly passes from your bloodstream to your brain.  The result is the production of epinephrine.  Epinephrine is a hormone that stimulates the body and brain allowing you to keep more focused.
  • Eggs – Eggs are rich in protein and leucine. These are both known to stimulate energy.
  • Water – Not drinking enough water could cause dehydration which can cause your body functions to slow down and make you feel sluggish. It is a good habit to drink water throughout your day, even if you are not thirsty.
  • Dark Chocolate – Dark chocolate has a high content of cocoa. Cocoa has antioxidants that have proven health benefits, like increasing your blood flow.  An increased blood flow helps deliver oxygen to the brain and muscles, improving their functions.   Additionally, dark chocolate contains compounds such as caffeine, a known ingredient to enhance mental energy and mood.

If you’d like to speak with a Jamaica Hospital Medical Center licensed nutritionist, call 718-206-7001 to schedule an appointment.

For these and other healthy food and beverages that can give your day a boost, visit healthline.com.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Can Too Much Sleep Be Bad For Your Health?

“You have to get enough sleep if you want to stay healthy.” It’s a common phrase that emphasizes how important getting enough sleep is to our overall well-being. So if sleep is that important, it would make sense that the more we get of it, the better we will feel. However, the idea that there is no such thing as getting “too much sleep” is one that is totally wrong.  In fact, chronic oversleeping can lead to a wide variety of health issues.

While the recommended amount of sleep for adults varies based on age, activity level, and lifestyle habits, generally speaking, most adults should get an average of between seven and nine hours of sleep every night.  Sure, it’s okay to sleep in a little late on the weekends, but if you find yourself requiring over nine hours of sleep on a consistent basis, or feel that you don’t feel well–rested when you don’t, it may be a sign of a another issue.

For some, oversleeping could be due to a condition known as hypersomnia, which causes people to require unusually long periods of sleep at night and suffer from extreme sleepiness throughout the day.  Those with hypersomnia also have low levels of energy, experience problems remembering things and do not feel recharged from a nap like the rest of us do.

Hypersomnia is not the only reason one might require extra sleep. Other reasons may include the use of certain substances, such as alcohol or some prescription medications. Obstructive sleep apnea may also be another reason why someone needs more sleep as those with this condition have their sleep cycles obstructed, making them feel less rested.  Lastly, depression is another leading cause for oversleep in many individuals as those who are clinically depressed are more lethargic and more likely to want to stay in bed.

Regardless of the reason why someone sleeps too much, the condition needs to be addressed as studies have indicated that oversleep can lead to many other health problems, including:

  • Diabetes
  • Heart Disease
  • Stroke
  • Obesity
  • Headaches
  • Back Pain
  • Depression
  • Cognitive Impairment
  • Fertility Issues

In addition to, or perhaps as a result of these other issues, those who oversleep have been found to have higher death rates than people who sleep seven to nine hours a night.

If you are oversleeping, it is important to address the reason why. If it is caused by alcohol or prescription medications, look to cut back or eliminate those substances from your daily routine. If you think you are oversleeping due to depression seek help from a mental health professional. Likewise, if you have been diagnosed with hypersomnia or another medical condition, treating the disorder may help you return to a normal night’s sleep.

You should also look to ensure that the sleep you get is restful by practicing good sleep habits. Try to establish a set bedtime and wake-up time, avoid eating a heavy meal or consuming caffeine before bed, and maintain a comfortable sleep environment. Exercising before bed can also help you relax and fall asleep easier.

Jamaica Hospital offers a comprehensive sleep center, which diagnoses and treats a wide variety of sleep disorders.  If you believe you require too much sleep, we can help you figure out why. To make an appointment at our Sleep Center, call 718-206-5916.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

What Pregnant Women Should Know About the Whooping Cough Vaccine

Whooping cough or pertussis is a highly contagious bacterial infection that affects the respiratory system.   It is spread person-to-person by coughing, sneezing, or sharing the same breathing space as someone who is infected.

Complications of pertussis can lead to serious illnesses or death in babies.  Infants under the age of one are at the greatest risk because their immune systems are not fully developed. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), “About half of babies younger than 1 year who get the disease need care in the hospital.”   Complications of whooping cough may vary by individual and can result in:

  • Pneumonia
  • Seizures
  • Brain damage
  • Apnea (slowed or stopped breathing)

The best way to protect babies from whooping cough is for pregnant women to get the diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTaP) shot.   The CDC recommends that, “women get the whooping cough vaccine between 27 and 36 weeks of each pregnancy.”   By receiving the vaccine during this time, mothers can pass on protective antibodies to their babies before birth.   This will offer protection to babies during their first few months of life before they are able to get vaccinated.

If safety is a concern, the CDC advises that getting the vaccine is very safe for mothers and babies.  Severe side effects are extremely rare. The most common side effects women may experience include:

  • Feeling tired
  • Pain, redness or swelling of the area the vaccine was given
  • Body aches
  • Headaches

If you are pregnant, speak with your Ob/Gyn about getting the DTaP vaccination, as well as other vaccinations needed to protect your baby.   To schedule an appointment with an Ob/Gyn at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-291-3276.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

When is the Best Time to Get a Flu Vaccine ?

Flu season can start in September and run until May. Even before the summer is over, pharmacies start advertising that the flu vaccine is available. While many people believe that the best time to get a flu vaccine is as soon as possible, getting it in October probably is the best option. Some research has shown that the effects of the vaccine start to wear off after six months so we want to make sure we are well protected when the height of the flu season is upon us.

Every year the flu vaccine is different, manufactured with the hope that it will be effective against the prevalent strain expected for that year. It is estimated that it takes approximately two weeks for the vaccine to become fully effective, so being covered early is important. Everyone who is going to be vaccinated wants to be prepared before the peak of the flu season which runs from December to late March. If you would to schedule an appointment for a flu vaccine in the Ambulatory Care Center please call 718-206-7001.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

SUGAR FREE LEMON POUND CAKE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Being the wife of a diabetic, I see how difficult it is for my husband to pass up so many delicious, sugary desserts.

Below is a recipe that I have made myself and recommend highly.  Although I am not the creator of the recipe, I thought it delicious enough to share.

-Joann Ariola, Director of Intergovernmental Affairs, MediSys Health Network

INGREDIENTS:

1 (18.25 Ounce) Package Sugar-free Yellow Cake Mix
1 (3.4 Ounce) Sugar-free Lemon Pudding Mix
1¾ cups Water
3 Egg Whites
¾ cups Reduced-fat Milk
½ tsp Lemon Extract
1 (1 Ounce) Package Sugar-free Vanilla Pudding Mix
1 (ounce) Sugar-free 
Cooking Spray

DIRECTIONS:

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F and coat a 10×15-inch pan with cooking spray.

Combine yellow cake mix and lemon pudding mix in a large mixing bowl. Stir in water and egg whites. Beat mixture on low speed for 1 minute. Beat for an additional 4 minutes on high speed.

Place batter into prepared pan and bake for 30 minutes or until cooked through.

Meanwhile mix milk, lemon extract, and vanilla pudding mix in a large mixing bowl. Add in cool whip and mix well. Spread mixture over the cake once it has cooled.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.