Are You an Emotional Eater?

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Often, people turn to food for comfort during times of stress, anger or sadness. However, if you are eating for emotional reasons and not because you are physically hungry, there may be a problem.

Some of the signs of being an emotional eater are:

  • Eating without hunger
  • Eating until you are uncomfortable or stuffed

Many people believe that emotional eating is due to a lack of self-control, but this is not the case. There has been extensive research to prove that emotional eating is actually an eating disorder.

The five top things that contribute to emotional eating are:

  1. Unawareness – Emotional eating can be a direct result of not being conscious of what or why you are eating. Unconscious eating is defined as continuing to eat when you have finished your meal and continue to pick at it, slowly eating the remaining portion that you intended to leave behind.
  2. Food as your only pleasure – Do not use food as a reward after a long and hectic day.  Although the calming, soothing affects you may feel when you eat ice cream or potato chips are real, due to the opioids they release in our brain, they are a difficult habit to break.
  3. Inability to tolerate difficult feelings –When you do not have the ability to tolerate life’s inevitable bad feelings, you are susceptible to emotional eating.  Practice letting yourself experience difficult feelings and keeping in mind that feeling mad, sad, rejected or bored, doesn’t change anything.
  4. Body loathing – Hating your body is one of the biggest factors in emotional eating.  You have to stop hating your body before you can stop emotional eating.
  5. Physiology – The best way to leave yourself open to emotional eating is to wait until you are too tired or hungry to eat.  When we are too tired or hungry, the body sends strong messages to your brain that signal it to eat, leaving us with an inability to fight off cravings or urges.

In addition these tips listed above, it is always a good practice to eat several small meals during the day and get plenty of sleep. Emotional eating is a cycle that cannot be broken until you make a commitment to reach deep inside yourself to make a change.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

March is National Kidney Month

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March is National Kidney Month and the National Kidney Foundation is urging all Americans to give their kidneys a well-deserved checkup.

The kidneys are two, fist-sized organs in your lower back. They maintain overall health by serving following functions:

  • Filtering waste out of 200 liters of blood each day
  • Regulating of the body’s salt, potassium and acid content
  • Removing toxins from the body.
  • Balancing the body’s fluids
  • Releasing hormones that regulate blood pressure
  • Producing an active form of vitamin D that promotes strong, healthy bones
  • Controlling the production of red blood cells

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease and Control, some quick facts on Kidney Disease are:

  • Kidney disease is the 9th leading cause of death in the country.
  • More than 26 million Americans have kidney disease, and most don’t know it.
  • There are over 95,000 people waiting for kidney transplants.
  • Currently, more than 590,000 people have kidney failure in the U.S. today.

Often times, kidney failure can be prevented or delayed through early detection and proper treatment of underlying disease such as diabetes and high blood pressure which can slow additional damage to the kidneys.

If you are 18 years or older with diabetes, high blood pressure, cardiovascular disease or a family history of kidney disease, you should schedule an appointment with your doctor and ask that you be screened for kidney disease.

If you would like to make an appointment to have your Kidney’s checked, you can call Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center at 718-206-7001 for an appointment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Grandma’s Chicken Soup

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When you have a cold or flu, it is best to keep hydrated and drink at least eight glasses of fluid a day.  A great way to keep hydrated, help relieve the symptomscongested nose and sore throat is to eat chicken soup.

Researchers believe that substances in chicken soup can help reduce the inflammation associated with a cold or flu.

If you would like to test the effects of chicken soup on your cold or flu you may want to try

Grandma’s Chicken Noodle Soup Recipe –

Ingredients:

2 ½ cups wide egg noodles

1 teaspoon vegetable oil

12 cups chicken broth

1 ½ tablespoons salt

1 teaspoon poultry seasoning

1 cup chopped celery

1 cup diced carrots

1 cup chopped onion

1/3 cup cornstarch

¼ cup water

3 cups diced, cooked chicken meat

Directions:

  1. Bring large pot of lightly salted water to a boil.  Add egg noodles and oil, boil for 8 minutes, or until tender.  Drain and rinse under cool running water.
  2. In a large saucepan or Dutch oven, combine broth, salt, and poultry seasoning.  Bring to a boil.  Stir in celery and onion.  Reduce heat, cover and simmer for 15 minutes.
  3. In a small bowl, mix cornstarch and water together until cornstarch is completely dissolved. Gradually add to soup, stirring constantly.  Stir in noodles and chicken, and heat through.

Serves 12

For this and other easy, delicious recipes you may want to visit www.allrecipies.com.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Arthritis and Exercise

Man Exercising On Stationary Cycle

 

Did you know that if you have arthritis, exercise may benefit your bones, muscles and joints?

Now, that doesn’t mean you have to run a marathon or swim with the intensity of an Olympic competitor.  Low impact exercise can help improve your health and fitness without hurting your joints. These exercises may include raising your arms over head or rolling your shoulders.

In conjunction with a treatment plan, exercise can:

  • Strengthen the muscles around your joints
  • Help you maintain bone strength
  • Give you more energy to get through the day
  • Make it easier to get a good night’s sleep
  • Help you control your weight
  • Improve your balance
  • Enhance your quality of life

Exercises can relieve stiffness and increase your ability to move your joints through their full range of motion.  It is always good to speak with your doctor about fitting exercise into your treatment plan.  The types of exercises that are best for you will depend on your type of arthritis and which joints are affected.

If you have arthritis and would like to explore adding exercise to your treatment plan, you can speak with one of the dozens of trained physicians at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center.  To make an appointment with a physician, call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

SNACK CHIPS THAT WON’T GO STRAIGHT TO YOUR HIPS!

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With the holiday season in full swing and snacking at an all-time high, you may be interested in this delicious and healthy alternative potato chips for your party table…

Cracked Pepper Potato Chips with Onion Dip

Ingredient’s for the chips:

  • 3 Large russet potatoes (2 ¼  pounds total), sliced into 1/8-inch thick rounds
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 teaspoons coarsely ground black pepper
  • Salt

 

Ingredient’s for the dip:

  • 2 teaspoons olive oil
  • 1 small onion, minced
  • 2 scallions, thinly slices, greens and whites separated
  • 1 ¼ cups nonfat Greek style yogurt or 1 2/3 cups regular nonfat plain yogurt
  • ¼ cup of mayonnaise
  • ¾ teaspoon garlic powder
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ teaspoon pepper

How to make this recipe:

Chips – Toss potatoes in a large bowl with 2 tablespoons of oil, and pepper until well coated.   Preheat oven to 450 degrees F.  Arrange potato slices in 1 layer on 2 cookie sheets.  Bake for 20 to 25 minutes until chips are crisped and lightly browned.  Remove from oven, season with salt and cool.

Dip – Heat oil over a medium heat and add onions and scallion whites.  Cook, stirring often, until golden brown and soft, about 10 minutes.  Remove from heat and allow to cool.  If using  regular yogurt, place it in a strainer lined with a paper towel and set the strainer over a bowl.  Let the yogurt drain and thicken for 20 minutes.

Combine onions with thickened or Greek style yogurt, mayonnaise, onion powder, garlic powder, salt pepper and scallion greens and stir well to incorporate.  Chill for 1 hour to let flavors meld.

Serve with chips

Excellent source of Vitamin C

Good source of Potassium

For more healthy snack recipes visit http://www.foodnetwork.com/healthy/packages/healthy-every-week/healthy-appetizer-recipes/healthy-appetizer-recipes.html

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

How “Annual” Is Your Annual Physical?

HypertesionThinkstockPhotos-477722758A.  Yearly

B. Bi-Yearly

C. When I don’t feel good

D. I don’t do doctors

 

An annual exam is a good way of tracking your health progress.  Some of the benefits are:

  • Primary prevention
  • To identify risk factors for common chronic diseases
  • To detect disease that has no apparent symptoms (secondary prevention)
  • A way for the doctor to counsel people to promote healthy behavior
  • To update clinical data since your last check-up
  • To enhance the relationship betweenyou and your doctor

If you are interested in scheduling an exam, Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center is centrally located and has convenient hours.  Call 718-206-7001 for an appointment.

 

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Holiday Heart Syndrome

Heart attack

Holiday Heart Syndrome, coined in 1978, is a real syndrome in which the heart’s vulnerability to certain arrhythmias is increased by excessive alcohol ingestion (binge drinking) and the onset of a heart rhythm disturbance in people who are otherwise healthy.

The most frequently seen arrhythmia during the holiday season is atrial fibrillation, in which the top chambers of the heart quiver or fibrillate causing the heart to beat irregular and often quite fast.

Excessive alcohol intake in women is defined as consuming seven or more drinks per week or over three doses at one time.  For men, heavy consumption is defined as over 14 drinks per week or over four drinks at one time by the U.S. Department of health and Human Service.

Alcohol alone does not fully explain Holiday Heart Syndrome.  There are other risk factors for atrial fibrillation that are higher around the holidays such as:

  • Overeating
  • Stress
  • High levels of sodium consumption
  • Dehydration

Everyone has some degree of stress in their lives.  Health concerns, family and relationship issues, financial problems can all cause stress which can ultimately affect your health; the idea of “letting go” at a holiday event and consuming more alcohol than usual as a way to forget the present may have a negative effect on your future.

If you have any heart symptoms, it is best to seek medical attention immediately; even if your symptoms appear ON a holiday.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

High Blood Pressure and Pregnancy

hypertension pregnancy -78484693 (1)Hypertension (high blood pressure) is one of the most common medical problems encountered by pregnant women. It is estimated that the disease affects six to eight percent of expecting mothers.

Women with a pre-existing history of chronic hypertension are likely to experience complications caused by the disease; however, women with no prior history are also at risk of developing high blood pressure or gestational hypertension. A high blood pressure rate during pregnancy is defined as a reading over 140/90, anything above that number is concerning.

Some women are more at risk for developing gestational hypertension than others.  Your risk may be higher if you are:

  • African American
  • Carrying more than one baby
  • Pregnant with your first child
  • Over 40 years old
  • From a family with a history of gestational hypertension or preeclampsia
  • Obese

High blood pressure during pregnancy poses various medical problems not only for the mother but for the developing baby as well.  Some of these problems include:

  • Harm to the mother’s kidneys
  • Placental abruption
  • Low birth weight
  • Premature labor

If left untreated, high blood pressure can develop into a serious condition known as preeclampsia.  This condition is most likely to occur in women with pre-existing and chronic hypertension.  The disease usually develops after the 27th week of pregnancy and is characterized by high levels of protein in urine and elevated blood pressure levels.  Women may experience symptoms such as headaches, nausea or vomiting, reduced urine or no urine output, swelling or shortness of breath.

If you have been informed by your doctor that your blood pressure levels are high it is important to get it under control immediately. You can do so by taking prescribed medications and managing your sodium intake. It is equally important that you maintain prenatal appointments to monitor the development of your baby.

For questions about prenatal care or to make an appointment with the Women’s Health Center of Jamaica Hospital, please call 718-291-3276.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

The Many Benefits of Garlic

Looking for a wonder drug that can:

ThinkstockPhotos-469904627• Lower your blood pressure and cholesterol? Check
• Boost your immune system? Check
• Control you diabetes? Check
• Improve your digestive and respiratory system? Check

What is this new, breakthrough drug? It’s not a medication at all; in fact you can find it at your local grocery store. It’s garlic!

Garlic is a plant that is used in many cultures for both culinary and medical purposes for hundreds of years. Eaten on its own, or more commonly used as an ingredient in many tasty dishes, garlic contains allicin, which is known to have anti-oxidant, anti-viral, and anti-bacterial properties.

Garlic has been shown to lower blood pressure by relaxing vein and artery walls. This action helps keep platelets from clumping together and improves blood flow, thereby reducing the risk of stroke. Garlic also decreases the levels of cholesterol and triglycerides, substances that increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases. Studies suggest that regularly eating garlic helps lower blood pressure and controls blood sugar and cholesterol levels.

This popular herb may also improve immunity by stimulating some of the body’s natural immune cells. Studies suggest that garlic may help prevent breast, bladder, skin, stomach, and colon cancer. Garlic’s antibacterial properties also make it a wonderful anti-viral and decongestant to prevent and combat colds, coughs, and upper respiratory tract infections. In addition, Garlic is often used to treat many other common maladies such as ear infections, toothaches, and treatment for warts and athlete’s foot.

Garlic can be digested either cooked or in raw form (but only in small amounts). If you do not like the taste of garlic there are also powdered or caplet forms. Your doctor can recommend which form of garlic is best for you.

For most people, consuming garlic does not cause any serious side effects if taken in moderation, but it can cause heartburn or stomach irritation if taken in excess. Due to its blood thinning properties, individuals taking anti-coagulant medications should speak with their doctor before increasing their daily garlic intake.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Hypertension Prevention in the Sweet Summer Heat

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The American Heart Association recently published the results of a study regarding hot weather and blood pressure. The findings just may surprise you. Hot weather may affect a drop in blood pressure during the day and an increase at night.

These changes may be attributed to the change of daily activities during the summer months, such as:

  • Walking regularly
  • Daily aerobic exercise
  • Maintaining a healthy weight
  • Curbing insulin-releasing carbohydrates
  • Lowering salt intake

Studies indicate that high blood pressure kills approximately 50,000 people in the United States each year, and contributes to the death of more than 200,000 annually. If you high blood pressure goes untreated or uncontrolled, it can lead to stroke, heart attack, heart failure of kidney failure.

Individual lifestyle plays an important role in treating your high blood pressure in any season. By successfully controlling your blood pressure, you may avoid, delay or reduce the need for medication.

If you are interested having your blood pressure checked or think you may have hypertension, you can call to make an appointment at the Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Center, 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.