Your Spinning World Could be Due to Vertigo.

Have you ever experienced dizziness or a spinning sensation when in fact everything is standing still? You may have experienced vertigo.

Vertigo can cause a person to feel light headed, off balance, spinning, seeing double, or as though they are falling. In severe cases it can be accompanied by nausea, difficulty walking, or loss of balance.

Vertigo is often related to a problem within the inner ear. It may be due to a buildup of fluid and changing pressure (Meniere’s disease), or due to an accumulation of tiny calcium particles called canaliths in the canals of the inner ear ( BPPV or benign paroxysmal positional vertigo). It may also be caused by an infection, usually viral, in the inner ear. All of these conditions can lead to loss of balance.

Symptoms of vertigo:

 A sensation of movement accompanied by nausea, vomiting, and sweating..

 Head positioning leading to dizziness

 Ringing in the ears and changes in hearing

 Abnormal eye movement

 Symptoms that are fairly constant in regularity
A [physician can diagnose vertigo through physical examination that may include a CT scan of the head to see if there are any brain injuries blood tests to see if the blood glucose is normal and an EKG to see if the heart rhythm is normal.

Frequently the symptoms of vertigo will resolve by themselves. Depending on the cause, some form of medical treatment may be necessary. When the cause is due to an infection, medications may be prescribed to cure it, and sometimes steroids will be given to reduce the inflammation. If the problem is being caused by a buildup of fluid in the ear, medication may be prescribed to help reduce it. If vertigo is being caused by an accumulation of tiny calcium crystals, a series of head and neck positioning exercises may be given to help move them out of the inner ear into a location where they can be more easily absorbed by the body. In extreme cases of vertigo, surgery may be needed to resolve the problem.

If you are experiencing symptoms of vertigo and would like to schedule an appointment with an ear, nose, and throat specialist, please call 718-206-6742.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Vertigo

Have you ever experienced dizziness or a spinning sensation when in fact everything is standing still? You may have experienced vertigo.

Vertigo can cause a person to feel light headed, off balance, spinning, seeing double, or as though they are falling. In severe cases it can be accompanied by nausea, difficulty walking, or loss of balance.

Vertigo is often related to a problem within the inner ear. It may be due to a buildup of fluid and changing pressure (Meniere’s disease), or due to an accumulation of tiny calcium particles called canaliths in the canals of the inner ear ( BPPV or benign paroxysmal positional vertigo). It may also be caused by an infection, usually viral, in the inner ear. All of these conditions can lead to loss of balance.

Symptoms of vertigo:

  • A sensation of movement accompanied by nausea, vomiting, and sweating..
  • Head positioning leading to dizziness
  • Ringing in the ears and changes in hearing
  • Abnormal eye movement
  • Symptoms that are fairly constant in regularity

A physician can diagnose vertigo through physical examination that may include a CT scan of the head to see if there are any brain injuries blood tests to see if the blood glucose is normal and an EKG to see if the heart rhythm is normal.

Frequently the symptoms of vertigo will resolve by themselves. Depending on the cause, some form of medical treatment may be necessary. When the cause is due to an infection, medications may be prescribed to cure it, and sometimes steroids will be given to reduce the inflammation. If the problem is being caused by a buildup of fluid in the ear, medication may be prescribed to help reduce it. If vertigo is being caused by an accumulation of tiny calcium crystals, a series of head and neck positioning exercises may be given to help move them out of the inner ear into a location where they can be more easily absorbed by the body. In extreme cases of vertigo, surgery may be needed to resolve the problem.

If you are experiencing symptoms of vertigo and would like to schedule an appointment with an ear, nose, and throat specialist, please call 718-206-6742.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

What is Herbal Medicine?

 

Herbal medicine, also known as herbalism or botanical medicine is a method of treating health-related issues, based on the use of plants or plant extracts that may be eaten or applied to the skin.

Herbal remedies are well rooted in medical practice.  Since ancient times, doctors have collected information about herbs to treat a variety of illnesses and to assist with bodily functions.

As a result, more than a quarter of all medicines used today contain active ingredients derived from those same ancient plants. While herbal medicine is not a licensed profession in theUnited States, herbal remedies, in the form of extracts, tinctures, capsules and tablets, as well as teas, may be recommended by healthcare professionals.

Herbal medicine blurs the line between foods and medicines.  Using herbs and spices that have a disease-preventive affect in foods is one of the best ways to take advantage of their healing power.

Herbal medicine has been used to treat or alleviate virtually every possible medical condition.  Some of the most popular herbal remedies and conditions for which they are used include:

  • Aloe – used topically for minor burns, sunburns, skin irritation or inflammation
  • Chamomile Tea – ingested for upset stomach, heartburn, indigestion and colic
  • Echinacea – ingested for colds, flu, and sore throat
  • Garlic – ingested to possibly reduce cholesterol and blood pressure, treat fungal infections and colds
  • Ginger – ingested for nausea and motion sickness and as an anti-inflammatory
  • Peppermint Tea – ingested for indigestion, nausea and other digestive problems
  • Tea Tree Oil – applied topically for fungal infections such as athlete’s foot and fungal infections of the toenails and fingernails
  • Tumeric – ingested to combat inflammation and protect against cancer and Alzheimers disease

This information is solely for informational purposes. It is not intended to be medical advice. Before undertaking any course of treatment, you should seek the advice of your physician or other health care provider.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Are Headphones Bad for your Hearing?

Headphones are popular for a multitude of reasons, such as convenience and sound quality, but there is a downside to these devices. According to The Journal of the American Medical Association, the number of teens who have experienced hearing loss has increased by 33% since 1994.  Do you catch yourself blasting music while listening to your headphones for long periods of time? If so, your hearing may be at risk.

Headphones come in a variety of styles, but the two most commonly used are earbuds and around-ear headphones. While around-ear headphones can have negative side effects, earbuds are the more dangerous because they are inserted directly into your ears, providing an uninterrupted route for the music to travel through your ear and straight to your eardrum. When sound enters the ear, the eardrum vibrates. These vibrations travel to the cochlea, where fluid carries them to fine hairs that trigger the auditory nerve fibers, which travel to the brain. When a sound is too loud, the hairs can become damaged, causing permanent hearing loss.

Noise is damaging at about 85 decibels, or the volume of a hair dryer. People who tend to play music up to 110-120 decibels over a long period of time while using earbuds, which increases the sound by 7-9 decibels, can experience a significant amount of hearing loss.

Want to avoid further hearing loss? Try some of these helpful tips:
• Listen to your music for no longer than an hour and no louder than 60% of volume.
• Purchase around-ear headphones with noise-cancelling technology so you can avoid blasting music and prevent music from having direct contact with your eardrum.
• Remove earwax. Earwax builds up every time you push earbuds into your ear canal, so make sure you gently clean it out to prevent hearing loss, discomfort and infection.

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All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

What is a 3-D Ultrasound?

One of the most exciting events during a couple’s pregnancy is receiving the ultrasound images of their baby, but many traditional ultrasound images leave a lot to the imagination.

Now, through the advent of 3-D ultrasounds, expectant parents can see much clearer, further defined images of their unborn children. 

2-D, or traditional ultrasounds, are created by interpreting reflected sound waves to form a picture. These pictures are captured by listening to sound waves on a single plain. Three dimensional ultrasounds, however, work by a different process known as “surface rendering”. In this case, the same 2D images are taken, but this time at different angles. These reflections are interpreted through sophisticated software, and a 3D image of the baby is instantly created. The software that creates these images usually also has “coloring” capabilities that can add different flesh tones to enhance the realism of the image.

The benefits of 3D ultrasound extend beyond just an improved picture to share with family. Women who have had a 3D ultrasound believe it has had a positive impact on their pregnancy by enhancing the bond it created with their baby.  Recent studies have also shown that women who received a 3D ultrasound have improved their maternal health habits as a result, including increased exercise, improved diet and the elimination of harmful habits. Another potential benefit is increased paternal involvement during pregnancy.

Jamaica Hospital Medical Center now offers all of its prenatal patients a digital package, which includes a set of 3D images. “The response by the patients has been overwhelming” states Mitchell Cornett, Administrator of OB/GYN at Jamaica Hospital. “To see their faces when they receive the CD with the high definition ultrasound is priceless.”

To make an appointment to receive your prenatal care at Jamaica Hospital’s Women’s Health Center, please call 718-206-3276.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.