Congenitial Heart Defect Awareness Week – Know The Facts About CHD

Every year, February 7th to the 14th is designated as Congenital Heart Defects (CHD) Awareness week. This annual week of recognition was created to raise awareness about CHD and to empower all patients and families affected by this condition.

Congenital heart defects are problems with the heart’s structure that are present at birth. These defects can involve:

  • The interior walls of the heart
  • The valves inside the heart
  • The arteries and veins that carry blood to the heart or the body

Congenital heart defects are the most common form of birth defect. They affect eight out of every 1,000 newborns. Each year, more than 35,000 babies in the United States are born with this condition.

There are many different forms of defects that can range from minor with no symptoms to complex with life-threatening symptoms. Minor defects often do not require any treatment or are easily fixed. However, those babies born with complex congenital heart defects require special medical care soon after birth.

Unfortunately, doctors often do not know why congenital heart defects occur. Heredity may play a role in cases. Children who have genetic disorders, such as Down syndrome, are often more likely to have congenital heart defects. In fact, half of all babies who have Down syndrome have congenital heart defects. Smoking during pregnancy also has been linked to several congenital heart defects.

Even though many children born with congenital heart defects do not require treatment, some do. Doctors can treat children with CHD with either catheter procedures or surgery. Thankfully, through advances in medicine, thee diagnosis and treatment of complex heart defects has greatly improved over the past few decades. As a result, almost all children who have complex heart defects survive to adulthood and can live active, productive lives.

Through continued education and support, we hope to conquer CHD.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

To Juice or Not to Juice? That is the Question.

Juicing or juice cleanses are growing in popularity as more people are using this practice as a way to lose weight or improve their health.  Juice bars are becoming a common fixture in shopping malls as the demand for freshly-made and all-natural juices increase.  There are a few advantages that can be achieved by juicing.

Some advantages of juicing include:

  • Juicing may be an easier way for some to obtain the daily fruits and vegetables that are essential in maintaining a healthy diet. Many people find it more convenient and less time consuming to drink fruits and vegetables instead of eating them.
  • Juicing can help in promoting weight loss- if it is done correctly and the body is not deprived of vital nutrients and fibers.

There also disadvantages associated with all-juice diets. The disadvantages that are associated with all-juice diets include:

  • An all-juice diet for a prolonged period of time is not recommended as studies have shown that LDL cholesterol levels may increase. Depriving the body of whole foods that are rich in nutrients could also weaken its ability to fight infections and function properly.
  • Juicing can prove dangerous for individuals with chronic health conditions such as diabetes and kidney disease. High levels of fructose, which is the sugar found in fruits can elevate blood sugar levels.  Excessive juicing can cause high levels of potassium and minerals to build up in the blood- this can become hazardous if one has kidney disease.
  • Juicing may not be the healthiest or most effective way to lose weight as your body may think it is starving and lower its metabolic rate. If your body is being deprived of the daily recommended caloric intake it could begin to burn muscle tissue instead of fat to provide energy, causing the loss of muscle mass.

If you choose to juice, consult your physician, especially if you have chronic health conditions and juice in moderation. Juicing can be beneficial if it is done properly and is supplemented with nutrient-rich whole foods. It is recommended that a glass of juice can be used to substitute one meal for example breakfast or lunch for the day. Most healthcare practitioners caution that juicing should not surpass the duration of a few days.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Cervical Cancer

Cervical cancer is a cancer that involves the lower part of the uterus (womb), which is known as the cervix. This can involve a microscopic lesion, that cannot be seen with the naked eye; or it can involve a larger area that is visible while performing a pelvic exam or during colposcopy.Signs and symptoms can include bleeding after sexual intercourse, irregular vaginal bleeding, bleeding after menopause, abnormal vaginal discharge, and/or pain.

Risk factors for cervical cancer include: infection with certain types of human papilloma virus, and having diseases that lead to lower immunity (such as HIV). Smoking is also a risk factor.

A vaccine is available that can prevent infection with some of the high risk and low risk types of HPV. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends routine vaccination for boys and girls ages 11 or 12. Vaccination is also recommended for women 13 years through 26, and men ages 13 through 21. Routine screening with a pap smear or going for an annual gynecologic exam can help with the detection of early signs and symptoms of the disease, or the detection of pre-cancerous changes of the cervix. Practicing safe sex and smoking cessation are also some methods to reduce your risk.

Cervical cancer is diagnosed with a biopsy of the cervix.  Prior to having a biopsy, there are abnormal results that can be encountered on a pap smear, that would require further testing or exams (such as colposcopy). There are also two types of procedures that can be performed if there is an abnormality detected with colposcopy and with biopsies, called a Loop Electrosurgical Excision Procedure (LEEP) or a Cone biopsy of the cervix. These procedures can be diagnostic as well as therapeutic.
Treatment options for cervical cancer include surgery, radiation, chemotherapy or a combination of these methods. If you would like to schedule an appointment with a physician in the Women’s Health Center, please call 718-291-3276.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

JHMC Partners with Shape Up NYC to Offer Free Stretch and Release Classes

In an effort to improve the overall wellness of our community, Jamaica Hospital Medical Center has partnered with the New York City Department of Parks and  Recreation’s; Shape Up NYC, to offer free Stretch and Release classes to everyone.

The class will be taught by the hospital’s own Janis Sharkey, Clinical Nurse Manager, who specializes in holistic care.  It will focus on applying principles of the Alexander Technique and Cantienica to stretch and strengthen muscles, as well as improve balance. Postures and movements are similar to Yoga.

Stretch and Release will begin on February 1st and will take place every Thursday at 5:15 pm at the MediFit Gym at Jamaica Hospital; 134-20 Jamaica Ave; 3rd Floor. For more details please visit https://www.nycgovparks.org/programs/recreation/shape-up-nyc

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

February is American Heart Month

Over 50 years ago President Lyndon B. Johnson proclaimed the month of February to be American Heart Month in order to bring attention to one of the leading causes of death in the United States. This tradition has been carried on by every President since.

Each year over 800,000 lives are taken as a result of heart disease, stroke and other cardiovascular diseases. Every 84 seconds someone in the United States dies from the disease and each year approximately 750,000 people experience a heart attack and of those, about 115,000 will not survive.

The American Heart Association recommends the following behavioral modifications to prevent heart disease:

  • Avoid smoking
  • Engage in some form of daily physical activity
  • Follow a healthy diet
  • Maintain a healthy body weight
  • Control cholesterol, blood pressure and blood sugar levels

The death rate from heart disease has been improving slowly over the last decade due to advances in medications, better diagnostic capabilities, and better access to health care, but the statistics are still pretty alarming. If you would like to schedule an appointment with a cardiologist at Jamaica Hospital, please call 718-206-6742.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.