Choosing the Right Form of Birth Control

Family planning services provide comprehensive educational, medical, and social support to individuals who wish to control the number of children in a family, and the interval between births.

A big part of family planning involves a decision to use some form of birth control. It is estimated that half of the women in the United States of reproductive age (13-44) are in need of some form of birth control; that is, they are sexually active and able to become pregnant, but not trying to. For these women and their partners, there may be several reasons why they do not wish to become pregnant including their current marital status, career goals, or financial situation.

Determining the proper form of birth control that best suits your lifestyle is an important decision. There are various forms of birth control available and not all methods satisfy everyone’s needs. Some of the types of birth control include:

Intrauterine Device (IUD) – A small t-shaped device that is placed in your uterus and is very effective. These devices last for a number of years, are easy to use, and can be removed at any time.

Birth Control Implant – The implant (Nexplanon) is a small rod, about the size of a matchstick that is inserted into your upper arm just under the skin.

Birth Control Shot – A shot that keeps you from getting pregnant, Depo-Provera or “Depo” for short is effective for three months.

Birth Control Vaginal Ring – The ring (NuvaRing) is a small, bendable ring that you insert into the vagina. It can be left in for three weeks and taken out during the fourth week.

Birth Control Patch – The patch is a thin piece of plastic that looks like a bandage and sticks to the skin. Put on the patch once a week.

Birth Control Pill – An oral form of contraception that is taken daily. It should be taken at the same time every day to enhance effectiveness.

Condom – A popular method, the male condom is placed over the penis before sex to prevent sperm from reaching the vagina and helps protect from most STIs (Sexually Transmitted Infections)

Internal (Female) Condom – The female condom is inserted into the vagina before sex to prevent sperm from reaching the vagina and helps protect from most STIs (Sexually Transmitted Infections).

Diaphragm– A diaphragm is a shallow, dome-shaped cup made of silicone that is inserted into the vagina before sex.

Cervical Cap – A silicone cup that is inserted in the vagina to cover the cervix and prevent sperm from reaching the uterus.

Sponge – The sponge is a round piece of plastic foam that is inserted into the vagina prior to sex.

Spermicide – Spermicides include a variety of creams, films, foams, gels and suppositories that are inserted deep in the vagina and contain chemicals to stop sperm from moving.

Sterilization (Tubal Ligation) – A surgical procedure that closes or blocks the fallopian tubes so you can’t get pregnant.

Fertility Awareness  – By carefully tracking your menstrual cycle you can determine the days you can get pregnant. This is not the most effective form of birth control. Talk to your provider for more information on other methods.

Jamaica Hospital’s Contraception and Family Planning Department can offer information on each birth control option. Together, our staff can work with you to determine the best method of family planning to suit your specific needs. To make an appointment, please call 718-291-3276.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Treating Prostate Cancer

Prostate cancer is one of the most common diseases that affect men’s health.  It is estimated that one in every seven men will receive a prostate cancer diagnosis during his lifetime.

If you or a loved one has been diagnosed with prostate cancer, you most likely have questions about available treatment options.

Before recommending a course of treatment, your doctor will need to determine the stage or severity of the disease.  This can be concluded by using imaging technology to assess how aggressive the cancer might be.  Some of the testing methods utilized by physicians include:

  • multiparametric MRI
  • enhanced MRI
  • positron-emission tomography (PET)

Once the stage of the prostate cancer has been determined, your doctor will recommend the best treatment option. Treatment is unique to each individual and may include a combination of therapies and medication management.

Depending on the severity of your case, treatment may include:

  • Active Surveillance- This is where your doctor will monitor your cancer closely. Surveillance typically includes conducting blood tests and digital rectal exams every six months, observing changes in symptoms and possibly administering prostate biopsies each year.
  • Surgery- One of the most common options used to treat prostate cancer is surgery. Surgery is usually considered when cancer has not spread outside the prostate gland. A radical prostatectomy is the operation that your doctor may perform. It involves removing the entire prostate gland as well as surrounding tissue.
  • Radiation Therapy- Is often used to treat cancers that have grown outside the prostate gland and have spread to nearby tissues. High levels of radiation are used to kill cancer cells or to keep them from growing.
  • Hormone Therapy- Also known as androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) or androgen suppression therapy,  is an option a physician may explore when cancer has spread too far to be treated with surgery or radiation therapy.  The goal of hormone therapy is to reduce the amount of male hormones (androgens) that are produced.   This helps delay the progression of prostate cancer.
  • Chemotherapy- If hormone therapy is not working; your doctor may consider chemotherapy as a form of treatment. During chemotherapy, a combination of cancer–fighting drugs is administered by mouth or intravenously.  This form of treatment is best used to shrink or eliminate cancer cells that have spread outside the prostate gland into other parts of the body.

Making treatment decisions can be challenging.  Your first step in making a decision is to learn about your options. As an informed patient, you will be able to help your doctor to make a care plan that is best for you.

To schedule an appointment with a urologist at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-7110.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

TALK YOURSELF POSITIVE

With all the running around we do and the stress we deal with each and every day, try to take a moment to center your mind and bring wellness to your entire being.  Try reciting these and other positive affirmations to help start your day in a positive way.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

What is Scoliosis ?

Scoliosis is a sideways curvature of the backbone (spine ). In the majority of cases,  the cause of this curvature is unknown. In general, girls have a higher risk of developing scoliosis than boys do.However,  there are cases where the curvature is due to a person having muscular dystrophy or cerebral palsy. Other causes of scoliosis include birth defects, heredity, and spinal injuries. Not all abnormal spinal curvatures are considered scoliosis. A non-structural deformity can be due to one leg being longer than the other.
Many cases of scoliosis are considered to be mild and other than the spine having an abnormal sideways curvature, there is little impact on the body’s ability to function properly. In serious, the curvature of the spine may be so severe that it affects the chest cavity and causes problems with lung function.  It may also affect the heart’s ability to function properly.
Symptoms of scoliosis:
• Hips that are uneven
• Uneven shoulders
• Uneven waist
• Back pain
• One shoulder blade that protrudes more than the other
In severe cases the ribs on one side of the body may protrude more than the other side
In order to diagnose scoliosis a physician will perform a physical exam that includes visualizing the patient’s posture, taking a family history, performing a neurological exam to check for muscle weakness, numbness, and abnormal reflexes. A series of x-rays will also be taken to confirm the diagnosis.
Treatment of scoliosis is determined by the severity of the abnormal spinal curvature, the age of the patient, the location of the curvature, and whether or not the curvature is “C” shaped or a “double S “. In many cases no treatment will be required, only careful monitoring to see if the condition worsens over time. In cases that are moderate a brace may be prescribed to prevent the worsening of the condition. Severe cases of scoliosis may require surgical intervention. This procedure involves fusion of two or more vertebrae and the use of either rods, plates and screws to hold the spine in place.
If you think that your child may have an abnormal curvature of the spine, speak with your pediatrician about an evaluation. To schedule an appointment with a pediatrician at Jamaica Hospital, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Jamaica Hospital Celebrates World Breastfeeding Week

Today Jamaica Hospital Medical Center hosted a baby shower for women in our community in celebration of World Breastfeeding Week. Our lactation consultants along with special guests spoke to moms-to-be about the importance of breastfeeding and the many health benefits it provides.

Each year, August first to seventh is designated World Breastfeeding Week to encourage breastfeeding around the world and improve the health of babies.

World Breastfeeding Week was created 25 years ago by the World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action (WABA) to promote the health benefits infants receive from being fed breast milk exclusively for the first six months of life. The observation is supported by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations Children Fund (UNICEF).

Organizations including WHO and the American Academy of Pediatrics have found that in addition to being an optimal source of nutrition, breastfeeding offers babies protection from bacteria and viruses that can lead to potential life threatening diseases. Breastfeeding also benefits mothers; women who choose to breastfeed are less likely to develop breast or ovarian cancer, diabetes and post-partum depression.

Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, recently designated Baby-Friendly USA promotes exclusive breastfeeding. Our hospital provides several social and clinical programs created to support pregnant and nursing mothers.   Some our programs include breastfeeding education classes, Centering Pregnancy and breastfeeding support groups. Last year we opened a lactation lounge for our community to utilize and access 24 hours, 7 days a week.

For more information about the services we provide, please visit www.JamaicaHospital.org.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.