High Blood Pressure? Check Your Salt Intake.

In the United States, one out of every three adults has been diagnosed with high blood pressure. It is a symptomless disease and is known as the “silent killer.” One step you can take to avoiding or controlling high blood pressure can begin with your diet.

A high sodium diet increases blood pressure in many people. Based on the recommendations of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the amount of salt intake in your diet should be no greater than 2,300 milligram per day, which is the equivalent of 1 teaspoon of salt. This can be easily consumed if you are not watching what you eat. You may be consuming them every day without knowing its potential to harm you, or your family, in the long run. Many convenience foods can be a culprit of containing high sodium content.

Some examples of the daily foods to avoid, which contain high sodium contents are:

  • Frozen Dinners and pre-packaged foods
    • Packaged deli meats/ lunch meats
    • Canned foods and fast foods
    • Soups and nuts
    • Spaghetti Sauce
    • Chips and dip

Some helpful tips to begin modifying your diet can include:

  • Creating a food diary to help keep track of the salt in the foods you eat
    • Read the ‘nutritional facts’ label on every food package and opt for a lower sodium version
    • Avoid pre-packaged foods and try using salt-free seasonings
    • Opt for fruits and vegetables to naturally spice up your food- onions, cranberries, and apple butter are some good examples of foods and products that can enhance your meal

Making the effort can be difficult at first but it’s worth your long term health. If you believe you are at risk of high blood pressure, speak with your physician and see if a low-sodium diet could benefit you.  If you do not have a private physician, please contact Jamaica Hospital’s Ambulatory Care Center at 718-206-7001 to set up an appointment with a physician.

For these and other helpful ways to side step hypertension, log onto www.webmd.com.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Visiting the Mall Can Improve Your Health!

We all know that regular physical activity is important to our overall health, especially for seniors.

Did you know walking is a great way for older adults to remain active?

Seniors who commit to taking a brisk walk each day may be at a lower risk of:

  • Heart Disease
  • Stroke
  • Type 2 diabetes
  • Breast and colon cancers
  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Insomnia

With the onset of colder months upon us, how can older adults continue their walking routine and remain active?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) suggests that in the colder months, you can utilize indoor malls for your brisk walk.  Malls can be pedestrian friendly, they are climate-controlled, are well lit, have benches for resting, fountains for hydrating, restrooms, as well as security guards and cameras for safety.

For more information on mall walking programs and for other walking resources visit the CDC’s Mall Walking: A program Resource Guide at – https://www.cdc.gov/physicalactivity/downloads/mallwalking-guide.pdf

So get yourself a comfortable pair of walking shoes, hit the mall and improve your health!

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Nat’l Stroke Awareness Month – Think F.A.S.T!

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May is National Stroke Awareness Month and in honor of that, Jamaica Hospital Medical Center (JHMC) would like to discuss how you can recognize the warning signs of having a stroke.

The easiest way to recognize the warning signs of a stroke is to think F.A.S.T. :

F- Face Drooping: If one side of the person’s face is drooping, ask them if their face feels numb and ask them to smile.   You should be concerned if they are unable to smile or their smile is uneven.

A- Arm weakness:  Does the individual’s arm feel numb or weak? Ask them to raise both arms and watch to see if one arm drifts downward.

S- Speech difficulty: If the person is trying to speak and they are difficult to understand or their speech is slurred, ask them to say a simple sentence, such as “my name is Jane,” repeatedly.

T- Time to call 9-1-1:  You should never wait more than five minutes to call 9-1-1 if someone is displaying these warning signs.

Additional symptoms of a stroke are:

  • Sudden confusion
  • Severe headaches
  • Blurred vision
  • Dizziness
  • Sudden loss of coordination

Stroke is one of the leading causes of death and long-term disability in the United States.  Eighty percent of strokes are preventable and by spotting these warning signs and acting quickly, the severity of a stroke can be reduced drastically.

If someone you know is exhibiting the warning signs of a stroke, call 9-1-1 for help immediately. If you are interested in finding out if you are at risk for a stroke, you can make an appointment with the Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center.  Call 718-206-7001 for an appointment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Signs of a Stroke

stroke signs -512037142 (1)The easiest way to recognize the warning signs of a stroke is to think F.A.S.T.  If someone you know is suddenly exhibiting the following signs, call 9-1-1 for help immediately:

F- Face Drooping: If one side of the person’s face is drooping, ask them if their face feels numb and ask them to smile.   You should be concerned if they are unable to smile or their smile is uneven.

A- Arm weakness:  Does the individual’s arm feel numb or weak? Ask them to raise both arms and watch to see if one arm drifts downward.

S- Speech difficulty: If the person is trying to speak and they are difficult to understand or their speech is slurred, ask them to say a simple sentence, such as “my name is Jane,” repeatedly.

T- Time to call 9-1-1:  You should never wait more than five minutes to call 9-1-1 if someone is displaying these warning signs.

Additional symptoms of a stroke are:

  • Sudden confusion
  • Severe headaches
  • Blurred vision
  • Dizziness
  • Sudden loss of coordination

Stroke is one of the leading causes of death and long-term disability in the United States.  Eighty percent of strokes are preventable and by spotting these warning signs and acting quickly, the severity of a stroke can be reduced drastically.

Jamaica Hospital Medical Center is a state- designated stroke center and during the month of May we are showing our support for stroke awareness and American Stroke Month by educating the communities we serve. To speak with a medical professional about stroke prevention and care please call our ambulatory care unit at 718-206-7001 or visit the National Stroke Association’s website at www.stroke.org.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.