The Benefits of Choosing a Pediatric Dentist for Your Child

If you were to look in a textbook for a description of a pediatric dentist, you would read a definition that states “the branch of the dental healing arts that focuses on the condition of children and associated structures of the oral cavity.”  However, if you ask a pediatric dentist to define what they do, you will get a much different answer. The truth is a pediatric dentist is so much more and there are many benefits to having a pediatric dentist treat your child.

One of the biggest advantages of choosing a pediatric dentist is their gentle nature. Going to see the dentist can be overwhelming for many adults, so imagine how a young child must feel. Pediatric dentists are aware of these common concerns and because they have the training and skills to manage them, they are best suited to make your child feel comfortable and at ease once they are in the dentist’s chair.

While having a dentist who makes your child feel comfortable is important, it is equally as important to make sure that the person taking care of them is well qualified; this happens to be another advantage of selecting a pediatric dentist. Pediatric dentists receive an additional two years of formal training to focus on the growth and development of a child’s oral cavity, from birth through the teenage years. Since pediatric dentists specialize in caring for children’s teeth, they are naturally better equipped to address the many potential problems that may occur, such as a delayed loss of baby teeth or the development of cavities and tooth decay.

Pediatric dentists take a holistic approach to providing care to children and work with parents to identify environmental factors that may contribute to poor dental health, such as dietary choices and the potential risks associated with habits such as thumb sucking, teeth grinding or the use of a pacifier.  These interactive opportunities serve to empower the entire family to lead a healthier lifestyle.

Statistics indicate that pre-school children are getting more cavities than ever before, with one out of every four children having one by the age of four. In addition, children miss more time from school due to tooth aches than they do from the flu. Due to these alarming facts a pediatric dentist will practice developmentally-based dental care by focusing a great deal of time during your child’s initial visits on teaching them about good dental habits, such as how to properly take care of their gums and teeth.

The pediatric dental team at Jamaica Hospital is dedicated to treating all children, from the time their first tooth erupts through their high school years. They believe the world is a happier place when it is filled with smiling children and they take pride in maintaining those smiles.

For more information, or to schedule an appointment at Jamaica Hospital’s Pediatric Dental Center, please call 718-206-6980.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Today is the Great American Smokeout

Today is the Great American Smokeout, an annual event when the American Cancer Society encourages everyone to quit smoking. This event helps to make people aware of the dangers of using tobacco products as well as the tools that are available to help them quit smoking.

The Great American Smokeout started in 1970 in a small town in Massachusetts. People were asked to give up smoking for one day and to take the money that they would have spent on cigarettes and donate it to a local high school scholarship fund. The event spread to other cities both large and small and eventually led to legislation that bans smoking in workplaces, restaurants, and other public spaces both indoors and outdoors.

Smoking  is responsible for one in five deaths in the United States today. Lung cancer is the leading cause of death in both men and women. Smoking is also the cause of cancer of the larynx, mouth, sinuses, throat, esophagus, and the bladder. The number of people who smoke has dramatically decreased in the United States since the anti-smoking campaigns began. In 1965 it was estimated that over 40 percent of the population were smokers and today that number is around 18 percent.

Smokers have the best chances of quitting if they use at least two of the following methods:

• Smoking Cessation Groups
• Nicotine substitute products
• Support from family and friends
• Telephone quit lines
• Counseling
• Prescription medications that help to reduce the urge to smoke

If you would like more information about quitting smoking please call the American Cancer Society at 1-800-227-2345. If you would like to schedule an appointment with a doctor at Jamaica Hospital to discuss smoking cessation, please call 718-206-8494.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

November is Bladder Health Awareness Month

November has been recognized as Bladder Health Awareness month, to serve as a reminder to get the facts about common bladder health problems and to encourage patients to take an active role in their bladder health.

There are many conditions that can affect the bladder one of the most common is urinary incontinence. Urinary incontinence is the involuntary loss or leakage of urine. According to the American Urological Association, about 1 out of 2 women and 1 out of 4 men suffer from some type of urinary incontinence.

Urge incontinence also known as overactive bladder and stress incontinence are the two most common forms of this health issue. Urge urinary incontinence is when urine leakage occurs with the sudden and strong desire to urinate.  Stress urinary incontinence is when urine leakage occurs with physical activity such as laughing, sneezing, lifting or exercise. There are instances in which both urge and stress incontinence symptoms occur; this is known as mixed incontinence.

Depending on the type of urinary incontinence, extent of symptoms and treatment goals there may be one or more treatment options.

Treatment options include:

  • Physical therapy
  • Oral Medications
  • Vaginal Devices (pessaries,  incontinence inserts)
  • Bladder Botox
  • Surgery

There are a few things you can do to prevent common bladder health problems. Here are a few helpful health bladder tips.

  • Manage daily fluid intake and reduce bladder irritants like caffeinated beverages and alcohol
  • Limit or avoid very spicy and acidic foods that can bother the bladder
  • Stop Smoking
  • Stay active exercise regularly and don’t forget to keep your pelvic floor muscles strong with kegels
  • Try to maintain a normal weight, excess weight gain can increase your risk of developing urinary incontinence

If fear of leaking urine stops you from doing things you enjoy, it may be time to consider treatment. Here at Jamaica Hospital we have providers who specialize in the treatment of bladder control issues.  To learn more about treatment options for urinary incontinence or to schedule an appointment with one of our Urogynecologist, please call 718-206-7001.

Renee Rolston MD-OB/GYN

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Measles

The measles is a highly contagious viral infection that is easily transmitted from person-to-person. Thanks in large part to most people receiving vaccinations in early childhood; the number of cases had been kept low. Recently however, there have been a number of cases reported in the New York area; believed to have been spread by people who were exposed while visiting Israel.

People who have been infected with the measles virus may initially most likely have a fever, a cough, and white spots on the inside surface of the cheeks. The classic skin rash will also start to develop, usually on the face first and then spread down to the rest of the body. Long term complications can include an inner ear infection, diarrhea, pneumonia, hepatitis, encephalitis and in rare cases, death.

The people who are at greatest risk of contracting the measles are people who have not been vaccinated, who are immunocompromised, young children, pregnant women who have not been vaccinated.

Treatment of the measles involves basically just keeping the patient comfortable at home. Contact with others should be avoided as much as possible and proper handwashing should be exercised at all times.

If you think you or your child may have been exposed to measles, or exhibiting symptoms, please make an appointment with your doctor. To schedule an appointment at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-7001.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

October is Home Eye Safety Month

October is recognized as Home Eye Safety Month to bring awareness of all of the hazards that can be found in the home and provide information on ways to prevent eye related injuries.  Statistics show that almost half of the accidents that involve the eyes occur within the home. It is estimated that over 125,000 eye injuries occur in the home annually and are due to improper use of household products.

Some of the ways eye injuries in and around the home can be prevented include:

  • Wearing safety goggles when using hazardous chemicals
  • Ensuring that areas are well lit
  • Keeping paints, pesticides, fertilizers and other chemicals in a secure location
  • Making sure that children’s toys don’t have sharp edges.
  • Keeping scissors, paper clips, knives, coat hangers, pens and pencils out of reach of small children
  • Checking to make sure that there are no objects with sharp points left in places children can reach
  • Playing with fireworks should be avoided by everyone but especially young children

If an eye injury occurs, it is important to seek medical care immediately. Do not rub, touch or apply pressure to the eye. Never apply ointments or medication to the eye without being told to by a physician. If a chemical gets into the eye, begin flushing it out with water right away. Foreign objects in the eye should only be removed by a trained professional.

If an injury occurs to the eye, seek medical attention immediately by calling 911 or going to the closest emergency room. Your sight is very important and a little precaution can go a long way to making sure nothing happens to cause you to lose it.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Jamaica Hospital Celebrates Infection Prevention Week

October 14th marks the beginning of Infection Prevention week, an annual effort to highlight the importance of infection prevention among healthcare professionals, administrators, legislators, and consumers.

Over the past 32 years, infection prevention week has gained a great deal of recognition around the world and patients are now benefiting from the safer healthcare practices that are shared during this week-long observance. The theme of Infection Prevention week this year is Protecting Patients Everywhere. 

Jamaica Hospital Medical Center supports the prevention of infection among our patients, visitors, and staff. To help eliminate the spread of bacterial infection we urge every person who steps foot inside our hospital to learn about the best ways to protect themselves and others.

Below is a list of ways patients can reduce the risk of infection provided by the Association of Professionals in Infection Control (APIC):

  • Speak up for your care
  • Clean your hands often
  • Ask about safe injection practices
  • Ask to have your room cleaned
  • Ask questions about your medications
  • Ask if you should shower before having surgery
  • Ask each day if you still need a catheter
  • Ask about vaccinations so you stay healthy
  • Learn about healthcare associated infections

Jamaica Hospital is proud to share that we have made great strides in our infection prevention and control initiatives.  We are currently at 97% hand hygiene compliance, which has led to very low hospital-acquired infection rates including urinary catheter infections, surgical site infections, and bloodstream infections.

Jamaica Hospital knows that by practicing good hand hygiene and adhering to other patient safety initiatives as well as continuing to educate our patients, we are creating an even safer environment for our patients, staff and visitors.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Can Too Much Sleep Be Bad For Your Health?

“You have to get enough sleep if you want to stay healthy.” It’s a common phrase that emphasizes how important getting enough sleep is to our overall well-being. So if sleep is that important, it would make sense that the more we get of it, the better we will feel. However, the idea that there is no such thing as getting “too much sleep” is one that is totally wrong.  In fact, chronic oversleeping can lead to a wide variety of health issues.

While the recommended amount of sleep for adults varies based on age, activity level, and lifestyle habits, generally speaking, most adults should get an average of between seven and nine hours of sleep every night.  Sure, it’s okay to sleep in a little late on the weekends, but if you find yourself requiring over nine hours of sleep on a consistent basis, or feel that you don’t feel well–rested when you don’t, it may be a sign of a another issue.

For some, oversleeping could be due to a condition known as hypersomnia, which causes people to require unusually long periods of sleep at night and suffer from extreme sleepiness throughout the day.  Those with hypersomnia also have low levels of energy, experience problems remembering things and do not feel recharged from a nap like the rest of us do.

Hypersomnia is not the only reason one might require extra sleep. Other reasons may include the use of certain substances, such as alcohol or some prescription medications. Obstructive sleep apnea may also be another reason why someone needs more sleep as those with this condition have their sleep cycles obstructed, making them feel less rested.  Lastly, depression is another leading cause for oversleep in many individuals as those who are clinically depressed are more lethargic and more likely to want to stay in bed.

Regardless of the reason why someone sleeps too much, the condition needs to be addressed as studies have indicated that oversleep can lead to many other health problems, including:

  • Diabetes
  • Heart Disease
  • Stroke
  • Obesity
  • Headaches
  • Back Pain
  • Depression
  • Cognitive Impairment
  • Fertility Issues

In addition to, or perhaps as a result of these other issues, those who oversleep have been found to have higher death rates than people who sleep seven to nine hours a night.

If you are oversleeping, it is important to address the reason why. If it is caused by alcohol or prescription medications, look to cut back or eliminate those substances from your daily routine. If you think you are oversleeping due to depression seek help from a mental health professional. Likewise, if you have been diagnosed with hypersomnia or another medical condition, treating the disorder may help you return to a normal night’s sleep.

You should also look to ensure that the sleep you get is restful by practicing good sleep habits. Try to establish a set bedtime and wake-up time, avoid eating a heavy meal or consuming caffeine before bed, and maintain a comfortable sleep environment. Exercising before bed can also help you relax and fall asleep easier.

Jamaica Hospital offers a comprehensive sleep center, which diagnoses and treats a wide variety of sleep disorders.  If you believe you require too much sleep, we can help you figure out why. To make an appointment at our Sleep Center, call 718-206-5916.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Employee Spotlight Shines on Tracey Kunj-Ramen

This month Jamaica Hospital Medical Center shines its employee spotlight on one of our newest employees, Tracey Kunj-Ramen, the Certified Child Life Specialist for Pediatrics. Tracey joined our staff two weeks ago but is very familiar with Jamaica Hospital. She had been a volunteer on 2 South since 2007 while she was still a student. Tracey also spent some time doing an internship at Flushing Hospital Medical Center.

Tracey was born in Guyana, and grew up in Queens where she spent most of her life living, and continues to reside. She attended elementary, middle and began high school at Thomas Edison H.S. before moving for a short while to Connecticut. After she completed high school, she graduated from Hunter College with a BA in Psychology and received a Master’s of Science in Psychology from Southern New Hampshire University specializing in Child and Adolescent Development.

Tracey has two sons, ages five and two, who she loves spending time with. One of the things she and her husband enjoy doing is taking the boys on spontaneous road trips on the weekends. They enjoy discovering new places and having quality family time together. She also enjoys reading, dancing and eating Italian food whether at home or going out to her favorite restaurants.

Tracey enjoys working with the children who come to the hospital as patients. She understands how important it is to make not only the children feel comfortable and less anxious, but also how important it is to be reassuring to the parents. Tracey takes pride in her duties as a Child Life Specialist because she feels that people who have a positive experience at the hospital will feel confident about recommending their friends, family and neighbors.

We welcome Tracey to Jamaica Hospital and look forward to her contributions to our team of doctors, nurses, and other specialists who provide care to our youngest patients.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Jamaica Hospital’s Trauma Team Offers Driving Safety Tips to Seniors

Everyone remembers the day they passed their road test and received their driver’s license. Getting a license opens up a world of options for drivers and provides them with a sense of independence that they didn’t have before.

If you received your license a long time ago, and are now a senior citizen driver, you may begin to notice certain limitations that could potentially impact your ability to operate a vehicle. While for some, driving at an advanced age may no longer be advised, most seniors can still enjoy the benefits of driving by taking a few extra precautions.

Jamaica Hospital’s Trauma Division is offering the following tips to senior drivers to help them avoid injury to themselves, other drivers or pedestrians while on the road.

  • Have Your Vision and Hearing Checked Regularly – Be aware of any ocular conditions, such as cataracts, glaucoma, or macular degeneration that might affect your vision. If you wear glasses or contacts, make sure you wear them while driving. Similarly, if you require a hearing aid, make sure you don’t drive without one as it is an important device to help you hear car horns and emergency sirens.
  • Be Aware of Other Health Factors – Pain or stiffness in the joints can limit mobility and your ability to check mirrors or turn your head. Chronic fatigue can be a problem, especially during long drives, and certain chronic conditions such as diabetes or seizure disorders can affect your safety. Side effects from medications can also impact driving and should be discussed with your doctor or pharmacist before driving.
  • Know Your Limitations – As you age, it’s important to acknowledge that certain motor functions might not be as sharp as they once were and should be taken into consideration while on the road. It is advised that seniors should increase their following distance, use their brakes earlier, try to anticipate situations before they occur, and try to avoid highly trafficked areas when possible.
  • Avoid Dangerous Driving Conditions – Controlling your car in inclement weather, such as rain or snow is more difficult and therefore should be avoided. Driving at night can also pose increased risks because reaction times are often affected during this time of day.  Lastly, driving during rush hour presents additional opportunities for accidents to occur because other drivers tend to be more aggressive and inpatient. Under these conditions.

Getting older doesn’t mean that you can no longer drive. By following these tips, you can continue to drive without feeling as if you are a danger to yourself or others.

If however, you feel concerned about your ability to drive, it doesn’t mean you have to give up your independence. There are many car fare services and public transportation options that can still get you where you want to go.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Power Napping

It has been proven that taking a power nap during the day has many benefits. A nap can lower blood pressure and also reduce the level of stress.

Research has shown that the benefits of a midday power nap are determined by the length of the time a person spends napping. A nap that lasts 20 minutes will help alertness and will also increase motor function. Naps that last 30 to 60 minutes will improve decision-making skills, and a nap that lasts 60 to 90 minutes will improve the ability to solve creative problems. Most people will only be able to take a short nap. A person who naps longer than 20 or 30 minutes runs the risk of waking up and feeling groggy.

If your typical day starts at 7:00 AM and you go to bed for the night around 11:00 PM, then napping between 1:30 and 3:00 PM is when you will benefit from a power nap the most.

If you are having difficulty getting a good night’s sleep, specialists at Jamaica Hospital’s Sleep Center can conduct sleep studies to help determine the causes of your sleep deprivation. To schedule an appointment for an evaluation, please call 718-206-5916

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.