Employee Spotlight Shines on David Hutt

This month we are proud to shine our Employee Spotlight on David Hutt, Supportive Care Associate in the Operating Room. David is a native of Westchester County, having grown up in Peekskill where he attended Peekskill High School. David joined Jamaica Hospital 23 years ago, first rotating between units before moving to 3 North and currently in the operating room where he has worked for 21 years.

David is very proud of the work he does at Jamaica Hospital. He says that his co-workers are like family to him. Everyone works well together. He also enjoys interacting every day with his patients. He has received many compliments from the people he has helped. He credits his compassion and sense of humor for helping to make the patients’ experience a pleasant one. He looks forward to many more years of working at the hospital with his team.

David is known as an avid sports fan. His favorite team is the Pittsburgh Steelers, and he also roots for the Pittsburgh Penguins, The L.A. Lakers, and the New York Mets. He enjoys listening to all types of music, going to the movies, concerts, and sometimes just staying home and watching TV. Two of his favorite vacations were spent on a cruise and also when he went to Cancun. The best way he can think of to spend his free time is with family and close friends.

David has been living in Queens for 33 years, and the last 7 with his wife in Ozone Park and says that he really enjoys the cultural diversity and fast pace of the neighborhood and the city.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Fall Prevention Tips

Falls are a common occurrence among the elderly population, with more than one in four older adults experiencing a fall each year.

It is estimated that almost half of all adults who fall do not tell their primary care provider, often due to embarrassment or the assumption that falls are expected with aging. Understanding who is most at risk for falls and how to avoid them can help prevent bruising, broken bones, head injuries or internal bleeding – all of which can be life-threatening.

The American Geriatrics Society and the American Academy of Family Physicians identify adults older than 65 years old, anyone with a history of falls, weak leg muscles, or concerns with vision, walking or balance to be at risk for falls.

To prevent falls, it is important to give careful consideration to the possible causes.

  • Medications may have side effects like dizziness or drowsiness, which may increase your risk of falls. It is recommended that patients review all their medications with their doctor during their routine visits.
  • To avoid feeling lightheaded or weak, doctors recommend getting up slowly after lying down or sitting after prolonged periods.
  • If you use a cane or walker, learn how to use it correctly and be sure to keep it within reach.
  • Falls commonly occur when trying to reach items on high shelves. It is recommended to move hard-to-reach items to lower shelves, use a step stool or ask for assistance.
  • Bathrooms are common places for falls.  Installing handrails and bath seats are recommended to minimize risk.

Falls may also be caused by tripping over items. To improve the safety of your environment, it is recommended to:

  • Remove obstacles that may be in the way of walking, which include small objects
  • Consider rearranging furniture to maximize visible floor space
  • Rugs should be removed or secured to the floor using double-sided tape or nonslip backing.
  • De-clutter cords or wires
  • Turn on lights in hallways or stairways, or use a night light

If you live alone, you may benefit from a personal emergency response system to immediately alert emergency responders of falls or injuries. Examples include medical alert bracelets and necklaces.

If a fall does occur, notify your doctor and seek an evaluation to review the cause of the fall and identify any injuries. Even if you were not hurt, it is important to report falls to prevent a recurrence.  To speak with a Family Medicine doctor about fall risks and prevention, please call (718) 206-6942.

Ambika Nath DO, Family Medicine

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

The MediSys Health Network Recognizes The Accomplishments Dr. Sabiha Raoof During Women’s History Month

March is Women’s History Month.  In recognition of this special observance, the MediSys Health Network would like to honor a woman who is very important to Jamaica Hospital Medical Center and Flushing Hospital Medical Center, Dr. Sabiha Raoof.

Dr. Raoof began her career at MediSys as an attending physician in 1997 after completing her radiology fellowship training. According to Dr. Raoof, “I was young and full of energy, but I was also a mother of two young children, and that aspect of my life has always been very important to me. Working for MediSys allowed me to maintain a balance between my professional goals and my role as a mother.  I never had to compromise my priorities and that gave me the opportunity to grow and thrive professionally. “

After working for a few years as an attending physician, Dr. Raoof was appointed as the Chairperson of Radiology at Jamaica Hospital in 2000 and then at Flushing Hospital in 2001.  Dr. Raoof added “I am so happy that I was given the opportunity to build the department and I am so proud of what we have been able to achieve together.” Under her guidance, the Radiology Departments at both hospitals have earned the Diagnostic Centers of Excellence designation from the American College of Radiology.

Through the years, Dr. Raoof has taken on many additional roles in the healthcare industry that has brought a great deal of positive visibility to the network.  She currently serves as the Vice Chair for the American College of Radiology’s Quality Experience Committee and is a member of their Commission on Clinical Decision Support. She has also been working with CMS for the last four years, initially serving as a national faculty member for the Transforming Clinical Practices Initiative and now serves as one of the Clinical Champions for the Quality Payment Program.

Providing the highest quality care to our patients has always been a major focus for Dr. Raoof, so when she was appointed as the Chief Medical Officer for MediSys in 2017, her main goal was to use the position to improve the quality of care throughout the organization and to do so in a patient and family centered approach to keep patient safety in focus. AS CMO, she has been the driving force behind many initiatives designed to improve the patient experience.

 While Dr. Raoof appreciates the opportunities she has been given in the MediSys Health Network, she realizes that many other women are not as fortunate. “Even today, we have under-representation of female physicians in leadership positions in the healthcare industry. I feel lucky to work for this organization and I commend our administration for being so forward thinking and allowing the most qualified people to progress to leadership roles throughout the organization without any bias against gender, culture, religion or ethnicity.”

Women’s History Month is very important to Dr. Raoof. It not only allows her to thank the many women in her personal and professional life who have supported and been an inspiration to her, but it also serves as an opportunity for her to encourage her female colleagues to step up and be willing to lead.  According to Dr. Raoof, “Women’s History Month is a time to celebrate the tireless half of our population. Women are our future leaders, innovators, and peace-makers. This is a month to celebrate our progress in the face of historic challenge and to dream of our future. “

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Jamaica Hospital’s Trauma Service Wants to Educate the Public on How to “Stop the Bleed”

What would you if you encountered a traumatic event where someone was bleeding and no medical professional was immediately available? Jamaica Hospital’s Trauma Division wants to make you aware of a national campaign called “Stop the Bleed” that can help in these types of situations.

Uncontrolled bleeding is the number one cause of preventable death from trauma.  Stop the Bleed is a national awareness campaign that was initiated by the White House in 2015 to bring attention to this very serious situation. It is a collaboration of a number of Federal agencies, non- profit organizations and corporations. The purpose of this campaign is to teach as many people as possible what to do when faced with a bleeding emergency before professional help arrives. When an emergency arises often the first people on the scene will be non-medical professionals without much training in first aid. This campaign serves to train as many people as possible on what to do until help arrives.

These are the ABC’s to follow when someone is bleeding: :

  • A – Alert
  • Either call 9-1-1 or have another bystander make the call
  • B – Bleeding
  • Find the source of the bleed
  • C – Compress
  • Apply pressure to stop the bleeding. Cover the wound with a clean cloth and apply pressure with both hands, apply a tourniquet when possible, or pack the wound with gauze or a clean cloth

In addition it is important to assess the situation so that you can ensure your own safety. When it is possible, you should protect yourself from blood and blood products by using gloves and other protective gear when available.

If you would like to obtain more information on learning how to Stop the Bleeding, please visit the website www.bleedingcontrol.org

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Citrus Marinated Salmon with Couscous and Sauteed Haricot Verts

March is National Nutrition Month.  Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Department of Nutrition is marking the occasion with a healthy and tasty receipe for Citrus Marinated Salmon with Couscous and Sauteed Haricot Verts.

This receipe serves four (4)

We would like to thank our

INGREDIENTS:

Fish

Marinade:

3 Tablespoon Orange Juice

1 Tablespoon lemon juice

1.5 Tablespoon minced garlic

1 Teaspoon canola oil

Salt and pepper to taste

4- 4 oz Salmon filets

Haricot Verts- French Green beans

1 lb green beans, French, fresh

1 Tablespoon canola oil

3 cloves garlic, peeled, minced

Kosher salt to taste

Couscous:

Prepare according to package

PREPARATION:

To prepare fish:

  1. Combine marinade ingredients bowl, place salmon in marinade
  2. Heat canola oil in sautee pan over high heat
  3. Remove fish from marinade and discard excess marinade
  4. Place fish in hot pan, Flesh side down, cook for 4-5 minutes, flip fish to skin side, cover pan and cook 4 additional minutes or until cooked through and fish is flakey

To prepare green beans

If using fresh green beans – follow steps below. If using frozen – skip to step 5

  1. Trim ends of green beans
  2. Bring pot of water to boil, blanch green beans for 1-2 minutes in boiling water
  3. Shock green beans in ice bath
  4. Drain green beans
  5. Heat oil in sauté pan over medium high heat
  6. Add minced garlic, sauté 30 seconds until fragrant
  7. Add green beans and sauté for 1 minute or until evenly coated and heated through. (if using frozen green beans, will need more time to cook through)
  8. Season with kosher salt to taste

To prepare the couscous

  1. Cook couscous according to the package directions

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Poison Prevention Week- Child Safety Tips

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

The Benefits of Couples Counseling

There are many changes that couples can go through during the course of their relationship.  In some instances, these changes can lead to undue stress, strain and conflict on their relationship.

During these times, couples may benefit from counseling.  Couples counseling can be effective in helping you and your partner heal, foster forgiveness and help you reconnect.

Some benefits from counseling are:

  • Learning how to communicate in a non-adversarial way
  • Understanding the importance of listening to your partner and how to process what your partner is saying
  • Learning how to get your point across with assertion and not aggression or anger
  • Finding a way to discuss your issues without fear of retaliation or hurting the feelings of your partner
  • Learning how to work through your issues in a safe environment
  • Getting your feelings out in the open and not letting them fester
  • Re-committing to work out your issues together without engaging in conflict
  • Developing a deeper understanding of your partner and what their needs are

By entering into counseling, you may find that you and your partner are willing to put in the work needed to get through a difficult time. If the opposite is realized, you will then feel less guilt when you make the decision to end the relationship knowing you have given it every chance.

If you and your partner would like to speak with a counselor at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, call 718-206-5588 to schedule an appointment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Hypertension and Kidney Disease

High blood pressure is the second leading cause of kidney failure in the United States after diabetes.

High blood pressure, also known as Hypertension, can damage blood vessels in the kidneys, reducing their ability to work properly. When the force of blood flow is high, blood vessels stretch so blood flows more easily. Eventually, this stretching scars and weakens blood vessels throughout the body, including those in the kidneys.

If the kidneys’ blood vessels are damaged, they may stop removing wastes and extra fluid from the body. Extra fluid in the blood vessels may then raise blood pressure even more, creating a dangerous cycle.

Most people with high blood pressure do not have symptoms. In rare cases, high blood pressure can cause headaches.

Kidney disease also does not have symptoms during its early stages. A person may have swelling called edema, which happens when the kidneys cannot get rid of extra fluid and salt. Edema can occur in the legs, feet, or ankles and less often in the hands or face.

Once kidney function decreases further, symptoms can include:

  • Appetite loss
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Drowsiness or feeling tired
  • Trouble concentrating
  • Sleep problems
  • Increased or decreased urination
  • Generalized itching or numbness
  • Dry skin
  • Headaches
  • Weight loss
  • Darkened skin
  • Muscle cramps
  • Shortness of breath
  • Chest pain

Following a healthy eating plan can help lower blood pressure.  Your health care provider may recommend a dietary approach that includes foods that are low in fat and cholesterol, dairy that is fat-free or low-fat, fish, poultry and nuts, as well as, consuming less read meat, sweets and added sugars.

If  you are experiencing symptoms and would like to speak with a physician, please call Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center at 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Sleep Awareness Week

The keys to a healthy lifestyle are eating right, exercise, and what’s the third thing?  Oh yes, sleep. While we give a great deal of attention to the first two, the importance of a good night’s sleep is often overlooked.

Serene woman sleeping at night

March 10th through the 16th  has been designated Sleep Awareness Week and Jamaica Hospital Medical Center and the National Sleep Foundation (NSF) want to raise awareness and educate the community about how important sleep is to each and every one of us. While most of us understand the importance of getting a good night’s sleep, we often do not make sleep a priority.

There are many health benefits that sleep can provide. Sleep aids our heart, brain, lungs, and muscles to function properly.  Additional benefits include:

  • Improved immunity
  • Decreased pain
  • Increased alertness
  • Lower risk of injury
  • Improved memory
  • Better mood

The NSF recommends that adults receive seven to nine hours of sleep each night. They also provide the following tips to ensure a restful night’s sleep.

  • Stick to a sleep schedule of the same bedtime and wake up time, even on the weekends.
  • Practice a relaxing bedtime ritual Try to separate your sleep time from activities that can cause excitement, stress or anxiety; a lot of which can make it more difficult to fall asleep.
  • If you have trouble sleeping, avoid naps, especially in the afternoon. Napping may help you during the daybut it can interfere with your ability to sleep at night
  • Avoid drinking any caffeinated beverages at least five to six hours before bed.
  • Exercise dailyVigorous exercise is best, but even light exercise is better than no activity.
  • Evaluate your sleep environmentRemove any noisy distractions, eliminate bright lights and set a comfortable temperature to optimize your sleep.
  • Sleep on a comfortable mattress and  Make sure your mattress is supportive.

If you still have trouble falling asleep or getting a restful night’s sleep, you should speak with your doctor as there may be an underlining medical issue. Jamaica Hospital operates a state-of-the-art sleep center that can help diagnose and treat a variety of sleep disorders. For more information, or to make an appointment, please call 718-206-5916.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Jamaica Hospital Medical Center Announces Partnership with LegalHealth to Provide Legal Services to Our Patients

On a daily basis New Yorkers, especially low-income residents, face challenging financial and social issues. These factors can negatively impact their lives in many ways, most notably their physical and mental health. Lack of access to adequate housing, food, or safe and secure employment can impede their ability to seek and receive appropriate healthcare services for themselves and their families.  Jamaica Hospital Medical Center is working to remove these barriers by offering free legal services to its patients.

Every week an attorney from LegalHealth, a division of the New York Legal Assistance Group, comes to Jamaica Hospital’s Ambulatory Care Center to provide legal counsel to hospital patients on issues relating to government benefits, housing, workplace conditions, and immigration and credit problems. LegalHealth also assists patients and families develop advanced planning directives, wills and legal matters affecting families.

It is well established that unmet social needs have a direct correlation with poor health.  Social factors, such as food insecurity have been closely linked to higher risk of chronic conditions. Studies show that those who lose their jobs are 83% more likely to develop stress-related health conditions such as heart disease and stroke.

Jamaica Hospital made the commitment to fund the LegalHealth clinic knowing that addressing these issues will ultimately improve the health of its patients and potentially reduce unnecessary emergency room visits and hospital admissions.  According to Dr. Alan Roth, Chairman of Family Medicine at Jamaica Hospital, “By understanding these social determinants that our patients encounter on a daily basis and providing a resource to have them addressed, Jamaica Hospital and LegalHealth can remove many of the obstacles that prevent our community from improving and maintaining healthier lives.”

LegalHealth is also providing ongoing training to Jamaica Hospital’s providers to equip them with the necessary tools to help them identify any social, financial or other problems patients are experiencing which can be addressed with legal support.

The Legal Health clinic opened at Jamaica Hospital in January 2019 and is on site weekly.

Patients who utilize LegalHealth services are assured of complete confidentiality and services are completely free to Jamaica Hospital patients.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.