Raina Daswani

This month we would like to introduce you to Raina Daswani, a Respiratory Therapist who works primarily on the pediatric inpatient unit and also the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. She has been with Jamaica Hospital for almost five years and feels like it has become her second home.

Raina is a Queens native, having grown up in Forest Hills and graduating from Forest Hills High School. After high school she went on to study at both Queens College and the Borough of Manhattan Community College where she earned her degree in Respiratory Therapy.

Raina is very proud of the work that she is doing at the hospital. She enjoys the diversity of the illnesses that she treats and the people she meets every day. Her colleagues at Jamaica Hospital feel like a second family to her. Everyone is very supportive of one another and that makes coming to work every day very enjoyable. She says team work is very important especially when working at a hospital and people at Jamaica work well together. Raina feels very fortunate to have chosen the right career for her and likes that she gets to do something every day that she really feels good about.

Raina currently lives on Long Island, is married and she has a Maltese, named Simba. In her free time she enjoys reading, going to movies and to shows on Broadway. When she goes on vacation, she enjoys travelling to Europe. Raina looks forward to coming to work every day and we look forward to having her work with us for a long time.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Tips on How to De-Clutter Your Life

Life is busy. Often times, we tend to neglect our home, office space, or car and allow items to pile up. Things once considered a ‘project’ no longer continue to be a ‘work in progress’. It becomes a part of your everyday life and clutters your space.  Did you know that clutter can lead to a stressful lifestyle? Take a moment to “de-clutter”- your mental, and physical, health may depend on it.

Clutter is an excessive visual and physical stimulation.  A study conducted by neuroscientists at the Princeton University Neuroscience Institute observed people’s task performance in an organized versus disorganized environment. The results of the study exhibited that physical clutter in your surroundings competes for your attention, resulting in decreased performance and increased stress.

Stress can reveal itself in various ways demonstrating physical, emotional, behavioral and even cognitive symptoms. These symptoms can include being moody and frustrated, feeling overwhelmed, inability to focus, forgetfulness, and even procrastination. Long term health effects of stress can affect your mental health creating depression and anxiety. Physical stress can suppress the immune system causing fatigue and high blood pressure.

What can you do to “de-clutter”? Some helpful suggestions are:

  • Create a three pile system – place items that are cluttering your space into three categories: keep trash or donate. Try using this system once a month or even once a week- this can enhance mental clarity; this is a good idea for home and work.
  • Clear your desk before going home – make sure to file away certain items in a designated area, shred documents you no longer need, and create a ‘To-Do’ list to remind you of the things you need to tackle the following day.
  • Set an alarm – setting an alarm reminds you to carve out a designated time to clear out a specific area, either in your home or office or car. It can make all the difference to avoid wasting your precious time out with your family and friends.

A little time spent organizing can go a long way in providing some peace of mind, creating clarity and focus on the more important things in your life and career.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

It’s GERD Awareness Week – Learn How to Avoid This Digestive Disorder

Perhaps there is no other day of the year associated with eating more than Thanksgiving. With so much attention being paid to food consumption, it is fitting that this week we also raise awareness about a health condition that affects the digestive system.

November 19-25, 2017 has been designated Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (or GERD) Awareness Week. GERD, is a very common disorder that occurs when stomach acid or bile flows into the food pipe and irritates the lining.

After it is swallowed, food travels down the esophagus where it stimulates cells in the stomach to produce acid and pepsin (an enzyme), which aid the digestion process. A band of muscle at the lower part of the esophagus, called the lower esophageal sphincter (LES), acts as a barrier to prevent the back-flow. Gastroesophageal reflux occurs when the LES is weak or relaxes inappropriately, allowing the stomach’s contents to flow up into the esophagus.

Chronic heartburn is the most frequently reported symptom of GERD. Acid regurgitation (refluxed acid into the mouth) is another common symptom. Other symptoms can include belching, difficulty or pain when swallowing, or waterbrash (sudden excess of saliva). GERD may also lead to chronic sore throat, laryngitis, throat clearing, chronic cough, and other oral complaints such as inflammation of the gums and erosion of the enamel of the teeth.

Dietary and lifestyle choices can contribute to GERD. Certain foods and beverages, including chocolate, peppermint, fried or fatty foods, coffee, or alcohol may trigger reflux. Studies show that smoking can relax the LES and contribute to this condition. People who are obese are more prone to developing GERD symptoms.

Doctors recommend lifestyle and dietary changes for most people needing treatment for GERD. Along with lifestyle and diet changes, your doctor may also recommend over-the-counter remedies, or, in serious cases, prescribe medications designed to reduce acid in the stomach.

To speak to a doctor about treating your GERD, please call Jamaica Hospital’s Ambulatory Care Center at 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

How To Check Your Blood Pressure at Home

High blood pressure or hypertension is considered “the silent killer.” There are several reasons why it is referred to as such.

Most people with high blood pressure actually feel normal; however, if the disease goes undetected and is left untreated, it can lead to heart attack or stroke. In the United States today, heart attack and stroke are leading causes of death.

It is important to get your family, friends, and even yourself checked. You can visit your doctor or check at home.

It can be easy to measure blood pressure at home- here’s how:

  1. Purchase an automatic, cuff-style, upper-arm monitor. Automatic machines usually cost from $20-$40, and are available at many pharmacies or online.
  2. Get ready to measure! Do not smoke, drink any caffeinated drinks, or exercise 30 minutes prior to measuring.
  3. Sit with your back supported, feet flat on the floor, and legs uncrossed.
  4. Place the cuff onto your arm. This arm should be resting at the level of your heart or just below the chest. The cuff should be above the elbow.
  5. Push the button to begin measurement. Relax, breathe, and do not talk during measurement.
  6. Blood pressures are measured as two numbers: a top number (systolic) and a bottom number (diastolic). Write down both numbers, the time of day you measured, and the date(“141/88, 7:00 PM, 11/13/2017” )
  7. Repeat measurement after 1 minute. Write this number down also. Keep a blood pressure diary with all your measurements.

According to the recently updated high blood pressure guidelines of the American College of Cardiology (ACC), a blood pressure less than 120/80 is normal. Numbers above this measurement are considered elevated and are cause for concern.  The ACC has provided the following categories to further define blood pressure measurements and levels:

  • Elevated: Systolic between 120-129 and diastolic less than 80
  • Stage 1: Systolic between 130-139 or diastolic between 80-89
  • Stage 2: Systolic at least 140 or diastolic at least 90 mm Hg
  • Hypertensive crisis: Systolic over 180 and/or diastolic over 120

If your results are greater than 130 for the top number or greater than 80 for the bottom number, it is highly recommended that you see your doctor to receive a comprehensive medical examination.

If your blood pressure exceeds 180/120, the American College of Cardiology advises that you seek medical attention immediately, as this is critical.

Checking your blood pressure is important for heart health. There are also lifestyle changes that you can apply to your daily life to help you manage blood pressure levels and your health.  Lifestyle changes can include maintaining a healthy weight by eating a well- balanced diet, exercising regularly, reducing sodium intake, limiting the amount of alcohol you consume and quitting smoking.

To schedule an appointment with the Family Medicine Department at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call, 718-206-6942.

Radeeb Akhtar MD. MPH. JHMC Family  Medicine

 

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

The Great American Smokeout

Every year, on the third Thursday of November, the American Cancer Society encourages everyone to take part in the Great American Smokeout. This event helps to make people aware of the dangers of using tobacco products as well as the tools that are available to help them quit smoking.
The Great American Smokeout started in 1970 in a small town in Massachusetts. People were asked to give up smoking for one day and to take the money that they would have spent on cigarettes and donate it to a local high school scholarship fund. The event spread to other cities both large and small and eventually led to legislation that bans smoking in workplaces, restaurants, and other public spaces both indoors and outdoors.
Smoking  is responsible for one in five deaths in the United States today. Lung cancer is the leading cause of death in both men and women. Smoking is also the cause of cancer of the larynx, mouth, sinuses, throat, esophagus, and the bladder. The number of people who smoke has dramatically decreased in the United States since the anti-smoking campaigns began. In 1965 it was estimated that over 40 percent of the population were smokers and today that number is around 18 percent.
Smokers have the best chances of quitting if they use at least two of the following methods:
• Smoking Cessation Groups
• Nicotine substitute products
• Support from family and friends
• Telephone quit lines
• Counseling
• Prescription medications that help to reduce the urge to smoke
If you would like more information about quitting smoking please call the American Cancer Society at 1-800-227-2345. If you would like to schedule an appointment with a doctor at Jamaica Hospital to discuss smoking cessation, please call 718-206-8494.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Healthy Turkey Chili

With winter quickly approaching and the thermostat dipping, it’s the perfect time to make a big pot of Turkey Chili

This quick, delicious and healthy Turkey Chili dinner is simple to prepare and packed with nutrients.

INGREDIENTS:

1 ½  teaspoons olive oil

1 pound ground turkey

1 onion, chopped

2 cups water

1 (28 oz) can crushed tomatoes

1 (16 oz) can canned kidney beans-drained, rinsed and mashed

1 tablespoon garlic, minced

2 tablespoons chili powder

½ teaspoon paprika

½ teaspoon dried oregano

½ ground cayenne pepper

½ teaspoon ground cumin

½ teaspoon salt

½ teaspoon ground black pepper

DIRECTIONS:

  1. Heat the oil in a large pot over medium heat. Place the turkey in the pot, and cook until evenly brown.  Stir in onion and cook until tender.
  2. Pour water into the pot. Mix in tomatoes, kidney beans, and garlic.
  3. Season chili powder, paprika, oregano, cayenne pepper, cumin, salt, and pepper.
  4. Bring pot to a boil. Reduce heat to low, cover and simmer for 30 minutes.

For this and other  healthy recipes visit – http://allrecipes.com/recipe/80969/simple-turkey-chili/

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Foot Care

We often take them for granted but think how life would be different if we had serious problems with our feet or worse, if one or both were missing.
One of the big mistakes that people often make is not wearing shoes that fit properly. If shoes are too tight, they can cause friction against the skin which will lead to blisters, callouses and the potential for ingrown toe nails. On the other hand, if shoes are too loose, this can lead to the potential for falling. Worn out shoes may be very comfortable but can also be harmful.  Look at the bottom of the shoes to see if they are wearing out unevenly. If they are, it is time to treat yourself to a new pair.
Many people have difficulty trimming their own toe nails which can lead to problems, especially if the nails start to grow into the skin. That can lead to the potential for pain at the very least and also for infections. If you experience difficulty with keeping the nails properly trimmed, seek the help of a podiatrist who can assist you. Nail salons which are very popular may not be the best solution because the workers don’t always use instruments that are properly cleaned and they also may not use proper techniques.
It is important to keep the feet clean and dry. Always dry the feet thoroughly after bathing and especially between the toes. This will keep the skin from peeling. Poor hygiene can lead to serious problems and the possibility of infection.
During the winter months, our skin tends to be very dry and can crack. Using an unscented skin cream or Vitamin A and D cream once a day on the top and bottom of the foot can help avoid cracked skin. It is important to remember that these creams should not be used between the toes.
Never go barefoot in public areas, especially showers. There is a greater risk for contracting athlete’s foot and other skin diseases from these places. Wearing a pair of pair of rubber or plastic shoes in the shower can help, even in your own home.
People with diabetes have to be extra cautious when it comes to taking care of their feet. Even a tiny cut can be very dangerous. That is because people with diabetes tend to heal slowly and are often more susceptible to infection.
If you are experiencing any problems with your feet, you should make an appointment with a foot doctor who can assist you. To schedule an appointment at Jamaica Hospital, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

November is Bladder Health Month

The American Urological Association (AUA) has designated November as Bladder Health Month.

So often we take bladder health for granted until a problem starts to develop, therefore the AUA is committed to increasing the public’s awareness  about bladder health conditions.

Some symptoms of an infected bladder are:

  • Pelvic pain
  • Increased urge to urinate
  • Pain with urination
  • Blood in the urine

The good news is by taking an active role in your bladder health you can avoid infections and reduce the risk of developing several medical problems. Here are some ways you can help improve your bladder’s health and help it to function properly.

  1. Don’t wait long to use the bathroom. Holding in urine can add pressure to the bladder and increase the risk of developing infections.
  2. Do not rush when emptying your bladder. Rushing may result in your bladder not emptying completely- this can lead to bladder infections.
  3. Avoid food or drinks that contain irritants. Certain food or drinks that contain ingredients such as caffeine, artificial sweeteners, acid, spices, excessive amounts of salt and alcohol can worsen bladder problems.
  4. Drink enough water throughout the day. Drinking your daily recommended amount of water can help flush out bacteria in the urinary tract.
  5. Avoid constipation by adding fiber to your diet. Constipation often results in a full rectum which adds pressure to the bladder.
  6. Urinate after having intercourse. Men and women should try to urinate after sexual intercourse. This helps to flush away bacteria that may have entered during sex.

If you are experiencing symptoms of a bladder infection and have questions about maintaining bladder health, please call Jamaica Hospital Medical Center at 718-206-7110 to schedule an appointment with a urologist.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Early Onset Alzheimer’s

Many people associate Alzheimer’s disease with older adults that are advanced in age. However, the disease can also affect people who are younger than the age of 65.  When this happens, the disease is referred to as younger-onset or early onset Alzheimer’s.

Early-onset Alzheimer’s has been found to mostly affect people in their forties and fifties.   Currently, experts are unsure why some people get the disease at an earlier age than others.  Research does point to genetics as a contributing factor in some cases.

The symptoms and signs of early-onset Alzheimer’s may differ with each person and can include:

  • Personality or mood changes
  • Difficulty making decisions
  • Misplacing items on a regular basis
  • Frequently withdrawing from social situations
  • Difficulty finding the right words for specific items
  • Difficulty finishing a sentence
  • Losing track of locations, dates or times
  • Asking for the same information again and again
  • Difficulty learning new things

If you are experiencing symptoms or displaying signs of the disease on an ongoing basis, it is recommended that you consult a physician who specializes in treating Alzheimer’s.   In order to diagnose the disease, the physician may complete a comprehensive medical evaluation which can include cognitive tests, brain imaging, neurological and medical exams.

Early detection of Alzheimer’s disease can maximize the benefits received from treatment and may help you to maintain your independence longer.  Therefore, it is highly advised that you seek the assistance of a specialist immediately.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Diwali Toy Donation to Pediatrics

Jamaica Hospital Medical Center was the recipient of the first Diwali Toy Drive sponsored by Shri Surya Narayan Mandir. Members of the organization took time out of their schedules to distribute toys and other gifts to the children on the Pediatric and the Maternity units where both moms and babies received gifts

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.