Cervical Cancer – Who is at Risk ?

Cervical cancer card in hands of Medical Doctor

Cervical cancer is a cancer that involves the lower part of the uterus (womb), which is known as the cervix. This can involve a microscopic lesion, that cannot be seen with the naked eye; or it can involve a larger area that is visible while performing a pelvic exam or during colposcopy.

Signs and symptoms can include bleeding after sexual intercourse, irregular vaginal bleeding, bleeding after menopause, abnormal vaginal discharge, and/or pain.

Risk factors for cervical cancer include: infection with certain types of human papilloma virus, and having diseases that lead to lower immunity (such as HIV). Smoking is also a risk factor.

A vaccine is available that can prevent infection with some of the high risk and low risk types of HPV. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends routine vaccination for boys and girls ages 11 or 12. Vaccination is also recommended for women 13 years through 26, and men ages 13 through 21. Routine screening with a pap smear or going for an annual gynecologic exam can help with the detection of early signs and symptoms of the disease, or the detection of pre-cancerous changes of the cervix. Practicing safe sex and smoking cessation are also some methods to reduce your risk.

Cervical cancer is diagnosed with a biopsy of the cervix. Prior to having a biopsy, there are abnormal results that can be encountered on a pap smear, that would require further testing or exams (such as colposcopy). There are also two types of procedures that can be performed if there is an abnormality detected with colposcopy and with biopsies, called a Loop Electrosurgical Excision Procedure (LEEP) or a Cone biopsy of the cervix. These procedures can be diagnostic as well as therapeutic.

Treatment options for cervical cancer include surgery, radiation, chemotherapy or a combination of these methods. If you would like to schedule an appointment with a physician in the Women’s Health Center, please call 718-291-3276.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

It’s Sleep Awareness Week – Learn How Important Sleep is to Your Health

The keys to a healthy lifestyle are eating right, exercise, and what’s the third thing?  Oh yes, sleep. While we give a great deal of attention to the first two, the importance of a good night’s sleep is often overlooked.

Serene woman sleeping at night

April 23rd through April 29th has been designated Sleep Awareness Week and Jamaica Hospital Medical Center and the National Sleep Foundation (NSF) want to raise awareness and educate the community about how important sleep is to each and every one of us. While most of us understand the importance of getting a good night’s sleep, we often do not make sleep a priority.

To raise awareness, the NSF has created an advocacy campaign entitled “Sleep Better. Feel Better. ” It centers around highlighting the many benefits sleep has on our body and mind and reminds everyone how vital sleep is to our overall health and well-being. Sleep aids our heart, brain, lungs, and muscles and has many other benefits including:

  • Improved immunity
  • Decreased pain
  • Increased alertness
  • Lower risk of injury
  • Improved memory
  • Better mood

The NSF recommends that adults receive seven to nine hours of sleep each night. They also provide the following tips to ensure a restful night’s sleep.

  • Stick to a sleep schedule of the same bedtime and wake up time, even on the weekends.
  • Practice a relaxing bedtime ritual Try to separate your sleep time from activities that can cause excitement, stress or anxiety; a lot of which can make it more difficult to fall asleep.
  • If you have trouble sleeping, avoid naps, especially in the afternoon. Napping may help you during the daybut it can interfere with your ability to sleep at night
  • Avoid drinking any caffeinated beverages at least five to six hours before bed.
  • Exercise dailyVigorous exercise is best, but even light exercise is better than no activity.
  • Evaluate your sleep environmentRemove any noisy distractions, eliminate bright lights and set a comfortable temperature to optimize your sleep.
  • Sleep on a comfortable mattress and  Make sure your mattress is supportive.

If you still have trouble falling asleep or getting a restful night’s sleep, you should speak with your doctor as there may be an underlining medical issue. Jamaica Hospital operates a state-of-the-art sleep center that can help diagnose and treat a variety of sleep disorders. For more information, or to make an appointment, please call 718-206-5916.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Understanding Hair Loss- When Losing Hair Becomes A Problem

young woman combing hair in bathroom. rear viewOn average, people can lose up to 100 hairs from their scalps each day.

Occasionally finding a few stray hairs on your brush or comb or in other places is not cause for alarm.  However, there are life events or lifestyle changes that can accelerate the normal rate at which a person loses hair.

Factors such as age, genetics, hormones, medication, pregnancy, cosmetic procedures (dyes and relaxers), stress, diet or certain illnesses can all serve as possible causes for a person’s hair loss.

There are several different types of hair loss (alopecia):

  • Androgenic alopecia-  is a genetic condition that affects men and women. This condition is also referred to male or female pattern baldness.
  • Involuntional alopecia- occurs naturally with age
  • Telogen effluvium-this causes temporary hair thinning resulting from changes in the growth cycle
  • Scarring alopecias- inflammatory skin conditions such as cellulitis or folliculitis can result in permanent hair loss
  • Traction alopecia- occurs when hair is constantly being pulled at the follicles. This commonly happens to men and women who wear tight hair styles

Balding occurs when the amount hair that is being lost becomes excessive.  There are cues that you can look out for that indicates excessive hair loss. They include:

  • Large amounts of hair on your pillow each morning
  • Large amounts of hair left in your brush or comb after grooming
  • Thinning on the top third of the scalp (for women)
  • Circular or patchy bald spots appearing on the scalp
  • Patches of scaly skin on the scalp

If you have concerns about excessive hair loss, it is recommended that you speak with a dermatologist. Your doctor may explore different types of treatments based on the reason for hair loss and severity.  Treatment options may include a dietary plan, laser therapy, surgery or medication. It is important to keep in mind that while most hair loss conditions can be treated, there are some forms such as androgenic alopecia that are untreatable.

To schedule an appointment with a dermatologist at Jamaica Hospital, please call 718-206-7001. The Division of Dermatology at Jamaica Hospital offers several services, including adult and pediatric dermatology, dermatologic and skin cancer surgery, and cosmetic dermatology.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Facts About Macular Degeneration

Age related Macular Degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of severe vision loss in older adults. It affects approximately 10 million Americans – more than cataracts and glaucoma combined. With an aging U.S. population, that number is only expected to increase.

AMD occurs when the central portion of the retina, known as the macula, which is responsible for focusing central vision, deteriorates.

senior elderly man holding book, glasses having eyesight problems unable to read

In its early stages, Macular Degeneration does not affect vision, but as the disease progresses, people may experience wavy or blurred vision or blurred spot in the center of their vision. If the condition continues to worsen, central vision may be completely lost.

Advanced stages of AMD can affect one’s ability to read, drive a car, watch television, or perform many visual tasks. In fact, those living with AMD are considered legally blind.

There are two types of macular degeneration; dry and wet.

  • Dry AMD is an early stage of the disease. Approximately 85% to 90% of AMD cases are the dry type. Dry Macular Degeneration is diagnosed when yellowish spots known as drusen begin to accumulate in and around the macula. It is believed that these spots are deposits or debris from deteriorating tissue. A few small drusen may not cause changes in vision; however, as they grow in size and increase in number, they may lead to a dimming or distortion of vision that people find most noticeable when they read.
  • Approximately 10 percent of the cases of dry AMD progresses to the more advanced and damaging form of the disease known as wet AMD. During this phase, new blood vessels grow beneath the retina and leak blood and fluid. This leakage causes permanent damage to light-sensitive retinal cells, resulting in distorted vision including the appearance of wavy lines, as well as blind spots and loss of central vision. These abnormal blood vessels and their bleeding eventually form a scar, leading to permanent loss of central vision.

As the name implies, the biggest risk factor for AMD is age as the disease is most prevalent in those 55 and older. Another known link to AMD is smoking as it is believed to double the risk of developing the disease. AMD is most common in Caucasians and in females. People with a family history of AMD are also believed to be at a higher risk. Hypertension and obesity are also considered risk factors for Macular Degeneration by some, although there is no conclusive research linking these factors.

There is no cure for AMD, but if detected early, there are medical treatment and lifestyle changes that can delay the progression of the disease. Macular degeneration may not present any symptoms in the early stages and it may be unrecognized until it progresses. For this reason, it is important for older adults to monitor their eye site and visit their eye doctor regularly. Eye care doctors can often detect early signs of Macular Degeneration before symptoms occur. Usually this is accomplished through a retinal exam.

Jamaica Hospital’s Ophthalmology Center can diagnose and treat a wide variety of eye disorders. To make an appointment, please call 718-206-5900.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

What Time Do You Typically Eat Dinner ?

Family Enjoying Meal At Home Together

Typically people eat dinner between 6:00 PM and 7:30 PM. Dinner time fifty years ago people ate between 5:00 PM and 6:30PM but now due to work and commuting schedules dinner time for many of us has shifted to eating later. The time that most people sit down for their dinner also varies in different parts of the country and the world. In some places around the world dinner isn’t eaten until 9 o’clock or later.
Research has shown though that eating a big dinner close to bed time can lead to weight gain because you probably won’t burn up all of the calories you take in. Also, late night eating can increase the amount of glucose and insulin in your body which can have an Effect on your ability to fall asleep. If you are going to be eating dinner late at night, it is best to make it a light one.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Autism Awareness Month

Autism or autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a developmental disorder characterized by a range of conditions that can significantly impair behavioral, communication and social skills.

Autism -624530410There are three different types of autism spectrum disorders; they include Classic Autism, Asperger Syndrome and Pervasive Developmental Disorder. Each condition differs by the severity of symptoms.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) children or adults with ASD may display the following symptoms:

  • Having delays in speech and language skills
  • Not responding to their name by 12 months
  • Avoiding eye contact or wanting to be alone
  • Having difficulty understanding the feelings of others
  • Displaying unusual reactions to the way things look, feel, sound or smell
  • Repeating actions over and over
  • Not looking at objects when other people point to them
  • Repeating words or phrases in place of normal language
  • Preferring not to be cuddled or cuddling only when desired
  • Having trouble adapting to changes in daily activities
  • Displaying behaviors such as flapping hands, spinning in circles or rocking the body

The most obvious symptoms of ASD typically emerge between two to three years of age. However, in some cases, they can be identified earlier.

There are no definitive causes of ASD but it has been discovered that there are several factors that can make a child more likely to have the disorder.  The CDC asserts the following findings:

  • Most scientists agree that genes are one of the risk factors that can make a person more likely to develop ASD.
  • Children who have a sibling with ASD are at a higher risk of also having ASD.
  • ASD tends to occur more often in people who have certain genetic or chromosomal conditions, such as fragile X syndrome or tuberous sclerosis.
  • When taken during pregnancy, the prescription drugs valproic acid and thalidomide have been linked with a higher risk of ASD.
  • There is some evidence that the critical period for developing ASD occurs before, during, and immediately after birth.
  • Children born to older parents are at greater risk for having ASD.

Diagnosing ASD can be difficult as assessments are primarily based on behavior and development. There are two stages of diagnosis, the developmental screening and the comprehensive diagnostic evaluation.

Currently, there is no cure for ASD but research shows that early intervention services and treatment can improve development in children.

April is National Autism Awareness Month, during this time;  Jamaica Hospital Medical Center promotes autism awareness through education.  The hospital proudly supports the nationwide goal of building a greater understanding and acceptance of ASD.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Irritable Bowel Awareness Month

Woman Stomach Ache

Woman Stomach Ache

April is Irritable Bowel Awareness Month. For many people who suffer from Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), finding out which foods agree with them and which foods cause them discomfort is essential to living successfully with the disease.
IBS is a condition whereby certain foods will cause intestinal discomfort after being consumed. These symptoms can include:
• Bloating
• Gas
• Nausea
• Abdominal cramps
• Diarrhea or constipation
There is no general rule of what to eat and what to avoid in treating IBS. A physician will go through a patient’s daily diet and see if there are certain foods that are more likely to act as irritants. Foods that typically cause a problem for people with IBS  have a high concentration of insoluble fiber which are found primarily in whole grains and vegetables and that do not dissolve in water.  Insoluble fiber rich foods pass through the intestine almost intact and can act as a natural laxative.  The foods that physicians who treat this disease recommend avoiding include:
• Nuts
• Caffeine
• Chocolate
• Beans
• Cabbage
• Raisins
• Broccoli
The act of eating and chewing  stimulates the digestive tract.  It has been suggested that instead of eating one or two full meals every day, eating five or six smaller portion meals may prevent   the digestive tract from becoming over stimulated.
To make an appointment with a physician specializing in IBS at Jamaica Hospital please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Healthy Roasted Shrimp and Vegetable Recipe

Roasted Shrimp and Vegetable recipe graphic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This quick, delicious and healthy shrimp and vegetable dinner is easy to prepare and full of nutrients.

Ingredients

  1. 1 red onion, large dice
  2. 1 red bell pepper, large dice
  3. 1 cup crimini mushrooms, stems removed and halved
  4. 1 1/2 cups broccoli florets
  5. 3 tablespoons olive oil, divided
  6. 1 teaspoon salt, divided
  7. 1/2 teaspoon pepper, divided
  8. 1/4 teaspoon lemon pepper
  9. 3/4 teaspoon paprika, divided
  10. 1 pound uncooked shrimp, peeled and deveined
  11. 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
Instructions
  1. 1) Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Add the onion, bell pepper, mushrooms and broccoli to a large sheet pan. Add 2 tablespoons olive oil, 1/2 teaspoon salt, 1/4 teaspoon pepper, 1/4 teaspoon lemon pepper, and 1/4 teaspoon paprika to the veggies and toss evenly. Roast in the oven for 15 minutes.
  2. 2) Meanwhile in a separate bowl add the shrimp, 1 tablespoon olive oil, 1/2 teaspoon salt, 1/4 teaspoon pepper, 1/2 teaspoon paprika, and 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder. Toss until shrimp is evenly coated.
  3. 3) Remove veggies after 15 minutes and add the shrimp directly to the pan with the veggies, spreading out evenly. Place back in the oven for another 5-7 minutes. Remove and serve alone, or over rice or pasta

http://www.lifeisbutadish.com/

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Hearing Loss in Young Adults

200299337-001Hearing loss is the third most common health problem in the United States.

Studies show that the number of people  worldwide who are at risk for hearing loss is growing and this includes a substantial number of young adults.  According to the World Health Organization (WHO),” around 1.1 billion teenagers and young adults face this risk due to exposure to unsafe levels of sound. ”

WHO explains, that “the amount of damage that is done depends on multiple factors – the duration of exposure to the sound, how intense or loud the sound is and how frequently exposure to unsafe levels of sound occurs.”

Doctors classify hearing loss by degree:

  • Mild hearing loss: One-on-one conversations are fine, but it’s hard to catch every word when there’s background noise.
  • Moderate hearing loss: You often need to ask people to repeat themselves during conversations in person and on the phone.
  • Severe hearing loss: Following a conversation is almost impossible unless you have a hearing aid.
  • Profound hearing loss: You can’t hear when other people speaking unless they are extremely loud. You can’t understand what they’re saying without a hearing aid or cochlear implant.(http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/hearing-loss-causes-symptoms-treatment#1)

Teenagers and young adults can do many things to help prevent hearing loss. “Measures as simple as keeping the volume of personal audio devices down to safe levels. Wearing ear plugs when visiting an environment with loud sound levels is important, as is limiting the amount of time spent engaging in activities with potentially unsafe sound levels.(“http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/290185.php)

It is important for young adults and teens to keep in mind damage done to their hearing is irreversible. “They should be aware that once you lose your hearing, it won’t come back.” Dr. Etienne Krug  WHO director for the Department for Management of Noncommunicable Diseases, Disability, Violence and Injury Prevention.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Adult Acne

problematic skin before and after makeup

According to the American Academy of Dermatology, some adults continue to get acne well into their 30’s, 40’s, and 50’s.  There is even a possibility that you can get acne for the first time as an adult.

As an adult, acne can be frustrating because the remedies you used as a teen are rendered useless or can even make your acne worse.  But, how do we determine whether the marks on our skin are acne or merely a blemish?

Blemishes, or pimples, can show up on your face, neck, chest, back and shoulders because these areas have the greatest number of oil glands.  The marks come and go with little or no treatment.  Acne, on the other hand, has a long term affect, requires treatment and if left untreated, may leave dark spots and permanent scars on the skin.

Women who are menopausal are more likely, than men of a similar age, to get what dermatologists call “adult-onset acne.”

Some other reasons for developing adult acne are:

  • Stress
  • Family history
  • Excessive use of hair and skin care products
  • Medication side effects
  • Undiagnosed medical conditions
  • Excessive consumption of carbohydrates
  • Excessive consumption of  dairy

There are many do it yourself remedies, but if nothing clears your adult acne, you should see a dermatologist.  With proper treatment and a great deal of patience, it can be controlled.

If you would like to have a consultation with a dermatologist, you can call the Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center at 718-206-7001 for an appointment.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.