The Importance of an Annual Exam

Note of doctor appointment on calendar

A.  Yearly

B. Bi-Yearly

C. When I don’t feel good

D. I don’t do doctors

An annual exam is a good way of tracking your health progress.  Some of the benefits are:

  • Primary prevention
  • To identify risk factors for common chronic diseases
  • To detect disease that has no apparent symptoms (secondary prevention)
  • A way for the doctor to counsel people to promote healthy behavior
  • To update clinical data since your last check-up
  • To enhance the relationship betweenyou and your doctor

If you are interested in scheduling an exam, Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center is centrally located and has convenient hours.  Call 718-206-7001 for an appointment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Why Patients With RA Should Be Concerned About Osteoporosis

rheumatoid arthritis Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) not only affects the joints but it can also lead to long-term problems in bone health, such as osteoporosis.

Osteoporosis is a disease which causes bones to become brittle, porous (less dense) and weakened, leaving them susceptible to fractures.  Studies have found that people diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis are at an increased risk of developing osteoporosis.

The reasons why the two are linked are numerous.  Complications of RA, including systemic inflammation, the use of glucocorticoids or corticosteroids and loss of mobility can all further the development of osteoporosis.

People with RA who have developed osteoporosis may not know they have the disease because it often goes undetected until the bones fracture. However, there are several lifestyle changes they can apply to reduce their risk, such as:

  • Eating a diet rich in calcium and vitamin D
  • Taking calcium and vitamin D supplements
  • Getting adequate sunlight to receive vitamin D
  • Exercise (weight bearing exercise)
  • Reducing alcohol consumption
  • Quit smoking
  • Taking recommended bone density tests

It is recommended that you speak with a doctor before making changes as each person’s case is unique. Your doctor may also prescribe medications to treat osteoporosis.

To schedule an appointment with a rheumatologist at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718- 206

 

-6742 or 718-206-7001. The Division of Rheumatology at Jamaica Hospital provides consultations for patients who develop rheumatological disorders, such as osteoarthritis and osteoporosis. There is a twice-monthly arthritis clinic and bone mineral density testing for diagnosing osteoporosis.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Thanksgiving Holiday Safety Driving Tips

Thanksgiving Safe Driving Tips The Thanksgiving Day holiday period (November 23 to November 27) is one of the busiest times of the year for travel. According to a recent study from AAA (American Automobile Association) a projected 48.7 million Americans will travel more than 50 miles from home to be with the ones they love.  The report indicated driving is the most popular means of travel and more than 89% of travelers will be on the road.

With more vehicles on the road during the holiday travel period, the odds of getting into an accident are greater. However, by following these safe driving tips from the American Red Cross you can keep your loved ones safe and enjoy your trip:

  • Buckle up, slow down, don’t drive impaired.
  • Be well rested and alert.
  • Follow the rules of the road.
  • Use caution in work zones.
  • Give your full attention to the road. Avoid distractions such as cell phones.
  • Observe speed limits – driving too fast or too slow can increase your chance of being in a collision.
  • Make frequent stops. During long trips, rotate drivers. If you’re too tired to drive, stop and get some rest.
  • Don’t follow another vehicle too closely.
  • Clean your headlights, taillights, signal lights and windows to help you see, especially at night.
  • Turn your headlights on as dusk approaches, or if you are using your windshield wipers due to inclement weather.
  • Don’t overdrive your headlights.
  • If you have car trouble, pull off the road as far as possible.

If winter weather threatens and you become stuck in the snow, these tips are for you:

  • Stay with the car. Do not try to walk to safety.
  • Tie a brightly colored cloth (preferably red) to the antenna for rescuers to see.
  • Start the car and use the heater for about 10 minutes every hour. Keep the exhaust pipe clear so fumes won’t back up in the car.
  • Leave the overhead light on when the engine is running to help rescuers see the vehicle.
  • Keep one window away from the blowing wind slightly open to let in air.
  • Carry an emergency preparedness kit in the trunk.
  • Keep your car’s gas tank full for emergency use and to keep the fuel line from freezing

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Kitchen Safety Tips for the Holiday Season

As the holiday season approaches, the kitchen can become especially busy for many. During this time of year, we tend to host more family dinners, and holiday parties. With all this increased kitchen activity, safety can sometimes be overlooked.

ThinkstockPhotos-81754625While cooking-related injuries can take place any time of year, these incidents tend to increase in frequency around the holidays. Some of the injuries that take place in the kitchen include cuts, sprains and eye-related injuries, but the most common type of cooking-related injury are burns to the skin from hot liquids such as water, grease, or other substances.

Caution is the best practice for avoiding burns especially, while frying or boiling your favorite holiday foods. It is best to keep the flame at a reasonable level to avoid splatter burns when frying food. Also, be careful with your eyes while working in the kitchen as oil or hot water can cause irritation, injury or infection.

In addition to burns, hospitals also treat many people who suffered lacerations from knives while chopping or carving foods. Most injuries occur on the hand, knuckles or tips of the fingers. In some cases these injuries can result in stiches or even the loss of a digit. When using knives it is very important to use the right tool for the job. Don’t use a bread knife to carve a piece of meat or try to chop vegetables with a paring knife. It might sound odd, but always keep your knives sharpened. More kitchen injuries come from people using cutlery with dull blades than sharp ones.

Here are a few additional cooking safety tips:
• When chopping vegetables, slice downward and away from your body while keeping your fingers away from the blade.

• Never fry a turkey indoors or in a garage or other structure attached to a building. Be careful to follow specific thawing, preparation, and cooking temperature and timing instructions to avoid potential serious injury.

• Keep a fire extinguisher handy in the kitchen, and know how to use it.

• Never leave your food unattended while frying or grilling.

• Use a timer and routinely check whatever you’re cooking.

• Keep your cutting area well-lit and dry. Good lighting will help prevent an accidental cut of the finger and making sure your cutting surface is dry will prevent ingredients from slipping while chopping.

• Make sure to wear a mitten when you are grabbing food from the oven.

Jamaica Hospital’s Trauma Division recognizes that many of these injuries, accidents, and fatalities are preventable. Our Trauma Division is fully dedicated to reducing and preventing these injuries through community outreach, education and advocacy.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Non-Traditional Thanksgiving Recipe

Intersection of Turkey and Cranberry

Who said Thanksgiving has to be traditional? If you’re looking to put a modern twist on some old school recipes then you might want to try this recipe. Chef John’s Pumpkin flan is a gluten-free and crust-less alternative to the usual pumpkin pie that gets passed around every year. All the flavor with less fat. Isn’t that what we all want? This video gives you an easy recipe for a light version of pumpkin flan: http://allrecipes.com/video/451/low-fat-pumpkin-flan/?internalSource=hn_carousel%2002_Chef%20John%27s%20Pumpkin%20Flan&referringId=16956&referringContentType=recipe%20hub&referringPosition=carousel%2002

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

How Does Sleep Affect Your Immune System?

Hispanic girl lying on her mother's lap

Lack of sleep can affect your immune system, but how? Studies show that people that don’t get quality sleep or enough hours of sleep are more likely to get sick after being exposed to a virus like the flu. The recovery time from a cold is also prolonged as a result of not getting enough sleep.

Sleep deprivation may decrease production of the amount of infection-fighting antibodies and cells that strengthen the immune system. Essentially our bodies need sleep to fight infectious diseases and recover faster from common cold viruses.

How much sleep do you need to bolster your immune system? The optimal amount of sleep for most adults is seven to eight hours of good sleep each night. Teenagers need nine to 10 hours of sleep. School-aged children may need 10 or more hours of sleep.

It’s very common to be told to get some rest when fighting off a cold or infection. Now we know why. As we move through cold and flu season, the key to staying healthy might just be getting a good night’s sleep.

However sleep does not always come easy to everyone. If you or someone you know is experiencing trouble with their sleep patterns, Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Sleep Center is available to treat you. This state-of-the-art Sleep Center is a 4-bed unit that features comfortable, homelike rooms with sound proof walls for total privacy. For more information please call, 718-206-5916.

For more hospital events, highlights, health and  fitness tips, visit us on 

Facebook.com/JamaicaHospital and follow us on Twitter @JamaicaHospital !

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Lung Cancer Awareness Month

Lung cancer, CT

November is recognized as Lung Cancer Awareness Month. The importance of this designation is to bring awareness to the fact that Lung Cancer is responsible for more than 25 percent of all cancer deaths. Lung cancer takes more lives each year than colon, breast, and prostate cancers combined.
Lung cancer is a form of cancer that starts in the lungs. In the early stages there may not be any signs or symptoms. A history of smoking definitely contributes to a higher risk of being diagnosed with the disease, though non-smokers also can develop lung cancer.
Signs and Symptoms of Lung Cancer include:
• A cough that doesn’t get better
• Coughing up blood
• Shortness of breath
• Chest pain
• Wheezing
• Hoarseness
• Weight loss that isn’t intentional
It is now recommended that certain patients who are over 55 years of age and have smoked for many years consider screening for lung cancer by doing  a a low dose CAT scan of the lungs. This may detect cancers at an early stage where they may be more curable. It is important to have a conversation with your physician prior to performing a screening CT scan so that the patient understands the pros and cons of screening. For example, many scans will show small nodules (small spots in the lungs) that are not cancerous but will require follow-up and patient’s need to understand this and be prepared for this possibility.
There are several types of lung cancer based on their appearance under the microscope. These include small cell cancer and non-small cell cancer, which  is a group of cancers that includes squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, and large cell carcinoma.
Testing that can help make the diagnosis of cancer includes chest  x-rays, CT scans,  PET scans, examination of the sputum, bronchoscopy ( a test in which a fiber optic  scope is passed into the lungs), and lung biopsies (which can be done by a needle although sometimes a surgical procedure is required). Not all tests will be required for every patient.
Once the diagnosis is established it is important to determine what stage the cancer is. Factors that go into staging cancer include the size of the tumor itself location and whether it has spread to the lymph nodes in the chest or to other parts of the body such as the brain, liver, bone or adrenal glands.
To schedule an appointment with a pulmonologist at Jamaica Hospital, please call 718-206-6742.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Can Lifestyle Choices Affect Infertility

Fit young woman fighting off fast food

Did you know that infertility affects 10-15% of couples in the United States.  Although it is commonly assumed that this condition occurs only in women; it affects both genders.

Infertility is usually diagnosed after a couple has tried to conceive for over one year without success.  In women this problem can be the result of several problems such as ovulation disorders, pelvic inflammatory disease, blocked Fallopian tubes or uterine fibroids.  Factors that can cause infertility in men may include oligospermia (very few sperm cells are produced) or azoospermia (no sperm cells are produced).

There are also lifestyle practices that can increase the risk of infertility. Smoking, consuming too much alcohol, mental stress and poor diet are all known to affect fertility.

Excess stress can affect the function of the hypothalamus gland; which regulates the hormones that tells the ovaries to release eggs.  Recent studies have also indicated that women experiencing greater amounts of stress were more likely to produce high levels of alpha-amylase and had a more difficult time getting pregnant.

The toxins inhaled from cigarette smoke can affect fertility by causing damage to reproductive organs, eggs and sperm.  Heavy and prolonged alcohol consumption can also cause imbalances in the hormones of the reproductive systems of women and can also damage sperm in men.

Adopting a healthy diet that includes foods known to improve reproductive health and boost fertility can increase the chances of healthy ovulation. Dietitians often recommend eating organic foods and cold water fish such as salmon, increasing the intake of whole grains and drinking freshly squeezed fruit juices to couples who are trying to conceive.

If you have been trying to conceive for at least one year without success, it is possible that your lifestyle could be a contributing factor. It is recommended that you consult an Ob/Gyn to explore the possible causes of your infertility.

To learn more about infertility and treatments please call the Women’s Health Center at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center at 718-291-3276.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Finding Time For Fitness

Work, career, health, family signpost

Many people find themselves wishing there were more hours in a day to get more accomplished especially when their day is already crowded. So how do you find time for fitness in between an already demanding schedule? Here are five tips to get you started:

  1. Turn your commute into a workout. During months with warmer weather you can take a bike to work instead of the train or bus. If biking isn’t your thing try getting off a few stops before your usual stop and walk the rest of the way to work. For those who need to drive, try parking further away from your usual spot and walk the rest of the way.
  2. Take the stairs instead. For daily transit commuters it’s always tempting to take escalator but taking the stairs instead will get your blood going in the morning. While at work try the stairs instead of the elevator especially if you spend most of your time sitting down at work.
  3. Set an earlier alarm. Carve some time out of your morning to go to the gym or go for a run before work.
  4. Lunch break workout. Some jobs have gyms on site or close enough in the area for you to replace lunch with a workout.
  5. Take the kids with you. For parents with younger children who can’t keep up on a bike or scooter ride there are jogging strollers available to make multitasking easier. This way you can save a few bucks on a babysitter and stay in shape.

You can probably think of a few more hacks to blend your work schedule with working out but these are great starters.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Asthma and Flu Season

Young woman using throat spray

Asthma is a lung disease that is caused by chronic inflammation of the airways, which can result in an asthma attack. During an attack, people experience symptoms such as wheezing, breathlessness, chest tightness, and nighttime or early morning coughing. Many things can trigger an asthma attack and one of the most common is the flu.

With flu season upon us, what impact can the flu have on those with asthma? According to the CDC, though people with asthma are not more likely to get the flu, an infection can be more serious for people with asthma, even if their asthma is mild or their symptoms are well-controlled by medication. An influenza infection can trigger asthma attacks and a worsening of asthma symptoms. It also can lead to pneumonia and other acute respiratory diseases. In fact, adults and children with asthma are more likely to develop pneumonia after getting sick with the flu than people who do not have asthma. Asthma is the most common medical condition among children hospitalized with the flu and one of the more common medical conditions among hospitalized adults.

If you have asthma, it is recommended that you get an annual influenza vaccine. Flu shots are generally recommended for people six months and older regardless of whether or not they have asthma. The flu shot has a long established safety record in people with asthma. In addition to getting the flu vaccine, proper hand-hygiene is strongly advised in order to prevent the spread of the flu.

If you do get sick with flu symptoms, speak with your doctor immediately to see if antiviral medications are an option for you. If prescribed, anti-viral drugs should be administered with 48 hours after the on-set of symptoms and can help minimize the effects of the flu. For people with asthma, this can help by reducing the risk of influenza from progressing into pneumonia or other respiratory diseases.

If you have asthma, and would like to receive a flu shot, please call Jamaica Hospital’s Ambulatory Care Center at 718-206-7001 to schedule an appointment or visit our website at www.jamaicahospital.org to find our closest MediSys Family Care Center to your home.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.