Today is World Hepatitis Day

Liver Protected Against Hepatitis Virus

Liver Protected Against Hepatitis Virus

In 2010 the World Health Organization ( W.H.O. ) designated July 28th as World Hepatitis Day. This serves to increase awareness about viral hepatitis and to influence change in disease prevention, testing and treatment. The goal for 2016 is to adopt a plan that will eliminate hepatitis as a public threat by 2030.
Hepatitis is a virus that causes an inflammation of the liver. The liver is an organ in the body that processes nutrients, filters the blood and fights infections. The most common forms of hepatitis are A, B, and C. Hepatitis B and C kill close to 1.4 million people each year and cause almost 80 percent of all liver cancer cases. Many people have the hepatitis virus and are unaware of it.
Symptoms of acute hepatitis B include:
• Fever
• Nausea
• Loss of appetite
• Jaundice
• Abdominal pain
• Fatigue
Hepatitis is spread from person to person through contact with bodily fluids. It is possible that people remain without symptoms for many years but during this time the disease is slowly destroying the liver. It can take many years for the symptoms to appear. Blood tests are available that can detect the virus at an early stage.
Ways to reduce infection:
• Use only sterile equipment for injections
• Test all donated blood for hepatitis
• Practice safe sex
• Encourage people to get hepatitis B vaccine
Medication exists that can cure hepatitis C and can control hepatitis B infection. When given properly, people are less likely to die from liver cancer and cirrhosis and also are less likely to transmit the disease to others. The hepatitis B vaccine is given in three doses over a 6 month period and it is recommended that it be initiated right after birth if possible.
To make an appointment with a physician at Jamaica Hospital to discuss the vaccine, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Congenital Heart Disease

congenital heart disease 537016989Congenital heart diseases (congenital heart defects) are abnormalities in the structure of the heart that are present at birth.  They are the most common type of birth defect and affect eight out of every 1,000 newborns in the United States.

Congenital defects can involve abnormalities of the muscle, valves or interior walls of the heart as well as defects in the arteries or veins that transport blood to the heart.  Defects can be simple, where the child exhibits no symptoms (some may experience symptoms later on in adulthood) or complex resulting in serious complications or death.   Serious defects are often diagnosed while the baby is still in the womb or soon after birth.

There are many types of congenital heart diseases and they sometimes occur simultaneously. Some of the more common defects are:

  • Coarctation of the aorta
  • Pulmonary valve stenosis
  • Transposition of the great arteries
  • Septal defects

Symptoms of congenital heart defects may include:

  • Rapid breathing
  • Fatigue
  • Bluish tint to skin, fingernails and lips(cyanosis)
  • Poor weight gain
  • Recurring lung infections

The causes of congenital heart defects are unknown; however, the disorder tends to run in families. Other factors that are believed to be contributors are a pregnant woman’s use of certain medications, alcohol or illegal drugs as well as viral infections such as rubella or poorly controlled diabetes during gestation.

Once diagnosed, treatment will vary depending on the severity of the defect. Some may not require treatment, as their condition can improve on its own while others may require medication, surgery or other interventional procedures. Most people born with serious heart defects will continue to need monitoring by a heart specialist and treatment throughout their lifetime.

The Pediatric Cardiology Division at Jamaica Hospital is a comprehensive service that diagnoses, manages, and provides long-term care to infants, children, and adolescents with congenital or acquired heart disease. Appointments for the Pediatric Cardiologist can be scheduled by calling 718-206-7591.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Jamaica Hospital and Councilman Eric Ulrich Collaborate To Educate the Community About Zika

zika 532278656The threat of the Zika virus outbreak in the United States is becoming more of a public health concern, especially now that it is summer and we are in the peak mosquito and travel season.

Councilman Eric Ulrich and Jamaica Hospital Medical Center wants everyone to know the basics and learn how to protect themselves and their loved ones from the growing threat of the Zika virus.

The councilman consulted with Dr. Farshad Bagheri; Director of Infectious Disease at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center to get important information you need to know. “I thank Dr. Farshad Bagheri and the entire team at Jamaica Hospital for putting together this timely and important information on the Zika virus,” said Councilman Eric Ulrich.  “I look forward to continuing our partnership so together we can help Queens residents stay healthy and safe.”

Here are the facts:

What is Zika and how is it transmitted?

Zika is a mosquito-borne virus. It is transmitted most commonly by the bite of the infected Aedes species mosquito. Transmission also occurs through sexual intercourse from an infected man to either female or male partners. The virus can be passed from a pregnant woman to her fetus. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is investigating the possibility of transmission through blood transfusions as well as female to male transmission through intercourse. To date, there are no reports of infants getting Zika virus through breastfeeding.

What are the symptoms?

Many people infected with the Zika virus will have no symptoms or mild symptoms that can last anywhere from a few days to a week. Most common symptoms include; conjunctivitis (pink eye), fever, rash and joint pain. Although symptoms are mild for most, a pregnant woman faces the greatest risk because Zika virus is known to cause microcephaly (a birth defect that causes a baby’s head to develop smaller than normal) as well as other brain defects in developing babies. It is also believed that the virus contributes to miscarriages. Zika virus has also been linked to a disorder of the nervous system known as Guillain-Barre syndrome. This disorder is more common in adult men than others. It causes the body‘s immune system to attack parts of the peripheral nervous system.

How long does the virus remain in the body if one is infected?

On average the virus remains in the body for about a week but there have been instances where it has lasted longer. The virus is present in semen longer than in blood.

Who is at risk?

Those who recently traveled to countries that have reported outbreaks, those who have had sexual intercourse with an infected man, pregnant women and unborn babies exposed to the virus.

 How can you protect yourself and loved ones?

Currently, there is no vaccine for the Zika virus; however, there are measures you can take to ensure safety and lessen the chances of infection.  Here are a few:

  • You can help prevent Zika infection by using EPA- registered insect repellents. The CDC suggests using repellents that have DEET, oil of lemon eucalyptus, picaridin, or IR 3535.
  • Wear long-sleeved shirts and pants, in mosquito-infested areas.
  • Pregnant women should abstain from sex or use condoms throughout their pregnancy when having intercourse with male-partners who may have been exposed.
  • Safeguard your home by throwing away, or, once a week turning over items outside or inside that collect water. Examples are tires, flower pots and trash containers.
  • Use indoor mosquito sprays in areas where the insects are commonly found, such as dark and humid places.
  • Install screens in doors and windows.
  • The best safety measure for pregnant women or women trying to become pregnant is to “postpone travel to countries declared high risk. If travel is unavoidable, she must consult with her doctor before embarking on that trip,” advises Dr. Bagheri. “Following the travel advice of agencies such as WHO (World Health Organization) and the CDC is also helpful.”

If you believe you are at risk for contracting the Zika virus and are experiencing symptoms, make an appointment to see your doctor immediately. To learn more information about Zika virus, please visit https://www.cdc.gov/zika/

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

History of Sunscreen

Three sunscreen tubes isolated on white

The use of sunscreen is highly promoted and protecting our skin from the harmful effects of the sun’s rays has become a major concern as we learn more about the damages it causes. Today we are able to choose from many brands that offer the level of protection we need- but did you know the concept of sunscreen is nothing new? In fact, sunscreen was used by ancient Egyptians.

The Egyptians were known to use rice bran extracts, jasmine and lupine extracts as a sunscreen because they realized these ingredients had the ability to absorb the sun’s very strong rays. These chemicals are still used today in some of the modern sunscreen products.

Modern sunscreen products really started to become popular in the 1930’s. A South Australian chemist, HA Milton Blake created a sunburn cream that had some limited success. This was followed by the introduction in 1936 by the L’Oreal Company of a sunscreen product that was very effective at providing protection from the sun’s rays. In 1938 a chemist by the name of Franz Greiter developed a cream called Glacier Cream that provided added protection. He is also credited for identifying the sun protection factor (SPF) that became a standard measurement of sunscreen effectiveness.
In 1944 an American pharmacist patented a sunscreen product that eventually would become Coppertone.

Later developments in this field produced products that would protect the skin from the UVA and UVB rays from the sun. Manufacturing sunscreen is a multi-billion dollar industry that continues to evolve. With more and more literature being published about the sun’s harmful effects on the skin, people will always be looking for better ways to stay protected as too much exposure can lead to skin cancer and other dermatologic conditions.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

CIPA (Congenital Insensitivity to Pain with Anhidrosis)

boy in bandage -508126582For some, the idea of having the inability to feel pain may seem ideal.  Although pain may not be one of our preferred sensations; it is very important.  Without the feeling of pain, you are more at risk of sustaining serious injuries. It signals that something is wrong with your body that requires immediate attention.

There are individuals who are insensitive to pain. This can be the result of inherited disorder known as CIPA (congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis). This is an extremely rare disorder which may also cause a person to produce very little sweat or none at all and makes them incapable of feeling temperature. These symptoms appear early in childhood, typically at birth or during infancy.

Unintentional injuries are very common in children with CIPA.  They may bite their tongues, fingers or lips, causing severe damages and in some cases amputation. Other complications associated with the disorder is high fever as the body is unable to sweat and lower temperatures, chronic bone infections as a result of chronic trauma or delay in healing of skin and bone injuries. In some cases, individuals may have intellectual disabilities.

The cause of CIPA is attributed to mutations in the NTRK1 gene.  Mutations in this gene lead to a loss of the sensory neurons, as well as the ability to feel pain.

Diagnosis of CIPA is usually confirmed after a complete evaluation of infants with recurrent fevers, who frequently bite their tongue, fingers or lips. In older individuals, an evaluation is required if they continue to have traumatic injuries.  Assessments of the sensory and autonomic functions are used to form a complete, clinical diagnosis.

There is no cure for CIPA but the condition is manageable with the help of a team of medical professionals that typically include specialists in orthopedics, pediatrics, dermatology, ophthalmology and dentistry. Parents of children with the disorder are strongly advised to keep a watchful eye at all times for signs of injury and to remove items that may result in accidents.

For more information about CIPA and other rare medical conditions, please visit the National Organization for Rare Disorders website www.rarediseases.org.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Pan-Seared Salmon with Kale and Apple Salad

pansearedsalmonpicIt’s summer and we are all a bit more conscious about our waistline, but we don’t want to skimp on taste and the feeling full.

If you goal is to eat a hearty meal that will keep you on a healthy course, you will love this nutritional, light and filling recipe !

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/food-network-kitchens/pan-seared-salmon-with-kale-and-apple-salad-recipe.html#lightbox-recipe-image

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

How Does Caffeine Effect Your Blood Pressure?

Nurse Visiting Senior Male Patient At Home

Are you one of many people who can’t function without having their morning coffee first? If so, there are a few effects that caffeine can have on hypertension. The java jolt of a caffeine fix may cause a jump in blood pressure — a particular problem in people who already have high blood pressure.

Caffeine can cause a short, but dramatic increase in your blood pressure, even if you don’t have high blood pressure. It is not clear what causes this spike in blood pressure. Some researchers believe that caffeine could block a hormone that helps keep your arteries wide enough for steady blood flow.

Some people who constantly drink caffeinated beverages have a higher average blood pressure than those who don’t drink any. Others who regularly drink caffeinated beverages develop a tolerance to caffeine. As a result, caffeine doesn’t have a long–term effect on their blood pressure. Research has shown that caffeine has a stronger blood pressure increasing effect in men who are older than 70 or who are overweight.

To see if caffeine might be raising your blood pressure, check your blood pressure within 30 to 120 minutes of drinking a cup of coffee or another caffeinated beverage. If your blood pressure increases by five to 10 points, you may be sensitive to the blood pressure raising effects of caffeine. If you plan to cut back on caffeine, eliminate it slowly over several days to avoid withdrawal headaches.

If you have high blood pressure, ask your doctor whether you should limit or stop drinking caffeinated beverages. Keep in mind that the amount of caffeine in coffee and other beverages varies by brand. Also, avoid caffeine right before activities that naturally increase your blood pressure, such as exercise, weightlifting or hard physical labor.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

The Facts About Synthetic Marijuana

Synthetic marijuana, also known as K2 or Spice, is a drug that is having a devastating effect on our area, and many other cities across the United States. In an attempt to raise awareness about the drug, Jamaica Hospital wants to share the following facts with the community.

Burning joint

K2 and other forms of synthetic marijuana are a blend of chemical substances known as cannabinoids that are sprayed on dried leaves. The result is a product that resembles marijuana, but has a much more potent effect. While the intention of synthetic marijuana is to mimic the effects traditional marijuana has on the body, the reaction to the synthetic version is often much more severe.

For a long time these products were readily available as they were sold in brightly colored packages at local corner stores and bodegas across the City. In addition to its accessibility, what has made synthetic marijuana popular for many is the cost. While a traditional marijuana joint typically can cost $5, a synthetic joint only costs about $1, making it very popular among not only the poor and homeless, but also with kids. Many users report another reason for taking synthetic marijuana is it doesn’t appear on drug tests.

In 2012 they were made illegal to sell in New York, but the law that was passed were very difficult to enforce because as the chemical products used became banned, those who made them would alter the compound to stay one step ahead of authorities.

This process of regularly changing the drug’s chemical composition also accounts for the unpredictability in the reaction by those who take it. Since the chemicals vary from packet to packet, people who use K2 may feel fine one time, and become extremely sick the next. Examples of this have been mass poisonings, most recently this week in Bedford-Stuyvesant and Bushwick.

Potential adverse reactions to smoking synthetic marijuana include: kidney failure, elevated blood pressure, loss of consciousness, violent behavior, nausea, vomiting, tremors, seizures, hallucinations, paranoia, agitation, anxiety, and even death.

In 2015 however, stricter laws were passed outlawing the sale of anything that could be marketed as synthetic marijuana, rather than going after the specific compounds. Still synthetic pot can be easily obtained in many of the poorer parts of the City and while some stores still sell it, much of the distribution has moved to the street.

Since the beginning of 2015, there have been more than 6,000 emergency-room visits in the city due to synthetic marijuana overdoses, with more than 1,200 emergency department visits occurring in July of 2015 alone. Officials say the situation has improved. Since the new laws took effect, the city has proclaimed some measure of success. In May, hospital visits for the drug were down 85 percent. While this news is encouraging, the events of this past week in Brooklyn remind us of how serious synthetic marijuana can be in our community and we urge everyone to remain aware of its dangers.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

HPV

Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is considered to be the most commonly transmitted sexually related disease in the United States. It is a virus that is transmitted from one person to another during sexual contact. It affects both sexes, but usually the rate of infection is twice as high for women than for men. While the body has the ability to fight off the disease naturally, most of the time, in some cases it can cause health related problems.  Many people who are infected are not even aware that they have it.
Complications of HPV:
• Genital warts
• Vaginal cancer
• Cervical cancer
• Anal cancer
• Cancer of the penis
• Cancer of the mouth and throat
There is no cure for HPV, usually treatment is for the condition that it causes. There are two vaccines, Cervarix and Gardasil available which can help to prevent the disease. Both will protect against cervical cancers in women, Gardasil will protect against genital warts and cancers of the anus, vulva, and vagina. Gardasil is also available for males. The recommendation is that these vaccines be given to girls and boys at 11 or 12 years of age. Women can get the vaccine up until the age of 27 and men can get the vaccine up to the age of 22.
If you would like to make an appointment with a pediatrician at Jamaica Hospital, please call 718-206-7001.

HPV Vaccine

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Senator Comrie and Jamaica Hospital -Promoting Wellness Through Walking

Walk Park

Jamaica Hospital Medical Center Community Outreach Department applaud the steps Senator Leroy Comrie is taking to prevent childhood and adult obesity by promoting healthier lifestyle options that include walking.

Obesity is a problem that affects many Americans. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) approximately one-third, or 78.6 million Americans are obese. In addition, 17%, or 12.7 million children are obese. Obesity is a leading cause of a number of serious health problems, including heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and certain forms of cancer

Living a healthy lifestyle, which includes physical activity, in combination with a healthy diet is the best way to combat obesity. While many forms of physical activity require time and financial commitments that many of us do not have, one of the easiest ways to get your daily dose of physical activity is through walking.

Walking is very important for weight control. Of course, the more you walk and the quicker your pace, the more calories you’ll burn.  Generally speaking, by adding 30 minutes of brisk walking to your daily routine, you could burn approximately 150 calories a day. If you walk at a more vigorous pace and for a longer duration of time, you can burn even more calories and lose even more weight.

Senator Leroy Comrie and other local elected officials understand the importance of promoting physical activity to combat obesity, so together they created the “Walk for Wellness” event. This second annual series of walks are held in various parks and playgrounds through Southeast Queens on select Saturdays. The walks began in June and continue into October. Each walk begins at 8:30 a.m. and is open to all.

According to Senator Comrie, “The Walk for Wellness event was created to be a community-wide initiative to combat obesity. By supporting one another in this effort, we can really make a difference by improving our health and the health of our neighbors.”

Of course, if you have underlying health issues, speak to a doctor before beginning any exercise program. If you do not have a doctor, you can call Jamaica Hospital’s Ambulatory Care Center at 718-206-7001 to schedule an appointment to determine how much walking is appropriate for you.

To learn more about the Walk for Wellness event, please call Senator Comrie’s office at 718-454-0162.

 

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.