The Dangers of Sports Enhancement Drugs

Syringe filled with doping

Do you remember the first time your favorite athlete broke a history-making record? It was mind blowing until they were investigated for using performance enhancing drugs. As much as any athlete would want to be invincible, they would have to accept the fact that they have limitations, especially where their body is concerned. However, doping is illegal in the sporting world, and many athletes have been stripped of their titles because of it. Take the time to learn about the health associated with performance-enhancing drugs.

Performance enhancing drugs are designed to improve physical abilities. The most common PED is steroids, the short term boost that give athletes the ability to push themselves further.

Like most drugs, steroids and other forms of PEDs also have side effects. When used for a long period or in excessive amounts, PED can result in increased cholesterol levels, liver damage, mood swings, hypertension, aggressive behavior, irregular heartbeat and other heart problems. Stimulants increase overall mental alertness and competitive response but it can also lead to addiction, brain hemorrhage, and heart attack. Apart from health problems that may be fatal, PED can also result in reduced athletic ability. What it gives in short term, it will take away in the long term.

Although the use of PEDs have become increasingly common you may learn that the benefits aren’t actually worth the risk.

For more hospital events, highlights, health and  fitness tips, visit us on 

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All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Infertility – Causes, Treatments and Tips for Coping

Tablet with the diagnosis Infertility on the displayInfertility is more common than many realize. It is estimated that 1 in 8 couples have trouble getting pregnant or sustaining a pregnancy.

Infertility affects both men and women equally. There are several factors that can contribute to infertility. In men some of these are:

  • Problems with the delivery of sperm
  • Exposure to toxic chemicals
  • Damage resulting from chemotherapy or radiation
  • Abnormalities in the production of sperm
  • Use of tobacco or alcohol

Some causes of infertility in women may be the result of:

  • Hormonal abnormalities
  • Ovulation disorders
  • Damage to reproductive organs
  • Uterine or cervical abnormalities
  • Use of tobacco or alcohol

Although these conditions can impair a person’s ability to conceive, seeking medical assistance as soon as possible can greatly increase their chances of conception.  A physician who specializes in infertility will conduct several tests to determine probable causes and explore several treatment options. Treatment can be surgical or medicinal and may include:

  • Intrauterine insemination
  • In vitro fertilization
  • Clomiphene citrate (Clomid)
  • Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (Gn-RH)
  • Human menopausal gonadotropin or hMG
  • Follicle-stimulating hormone or FSH
  • Metformin
  • Bromocriptine
  • Sperm extraction

While coping with infertility can be challenging, it is important for individuals to remember not to blame themselves, lean on their partner or loved ones for support, acknowledge stress and practice stress-reducing techniques, gain knowledge by utilizing resources such as the National Infertility Association’s website-www.resolve.org.

The National Infertility Association also founded National Infertility Awareness Week, which is observed each year to increase public understanding and awareness of the reproductive disease. People who are trying to conceive are encouraged to learn the guidelines for seeing an infertility specialist. For more information about this observance, please visit http://www.resolve.org/national-infertility-awareness-week/home-page.html

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Preeclampsia Awareness Month

pregpicPreeclampsia Awareness Month is a nationally recognized health observance that presents an opportunity to offer education to help increase awareness of this life-threatening disorder.

Preeclampsia occurs in eight percent of all pregnancies.  Formerly called toxemia, preeclampsia is a condition that is marked by high blood pressure in pregnant women that have previously not experienced high blood pressure.  Symptoms of preeclampsia include high levels of protein found in their urine and they may have swelling in the feet, legs and hands.  Preeclampsia appears late in the pregnancy, generally after the 20 week mark, although, in some cases, it can appear earlier.

If left undiagnosed and untreated, preeclampsia can become a more serious condition called eclampsia, which can put the expectant mother and baby at risk.

There is no cure for preeclampsia, but when it is caught in its early stages, it is easier to manage.

If you are pregnant and would like to make an appointment at Flushing Hospital Medical Center’s Women’s Health Center, call 718-291-3276, for an appointment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

National Mental Health Awareness Month

MentalHealthAwarenessMonthMay is National Mental Health Month.  During this month many mental health organizations across the country raise awareness to mental health by reaching millions of people through the media, local events and screenings.

Good mental health is critical for a person’s well-being at every stage of their life.  Mental illness is a real and disabling health condition that can have immense impact on individuals and families.  Mental disorders vary in type and severity and according to Mental Health America, one in four adults in the United States have a diagnosable mental illness.

Depression is the leading diagnosable mental illness.  Unfortunately, two-thirds of people do not seek medical treatment.

Mental disorders do not discriminate by race, ethnic and socioeconomic groups.  Risk factors include brain trauma, stressful events and financial concerns; families with a history of mental and addictive disorders are at an increased risk.

Treatment is individualized and may include counseling, psychotherapy, medication therapy, rehabilitation, and attention to other mental and psychosocial problems. If you or someone you know is showing signs of mental illness, you can call Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Mental Health Center at, 718-206-5573, for an appointment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

This Sunday is Meningitis Awareness Day – Do You Know the Facts About Meningitis?

This Sunday, April 24 in World Meningitis Awareness Day and Jamaica Hospital Medical Center wants to share the following facts about meningitis.

Meningitis

Meningitis is an inflammation of the fluid that covers the brain and spinal cord. It is an extremely serious condition that can result in death. Although anyone can develop meningitis, those most at risk are children under five and adolescents between 15-19 years old.

 

There are two main kinds of meningitis:

Bacterial meningitis is the more severe form of the disease and requires  treatment in a hospital setting. Viral meningitis is more common, and most people with this form of the illness get better in a couple of weeks. With mild cases, you may only need home treatment, including taking medicine for fever and pain and drinking enough fluids to stay hydrated.

Meningitis isn’t as contagious as viruses, such as those that cause the common cold, but it can spread from person to person via coughing, sneezing, kissing, sexual contact, or contact with infected blood or stool. A mother can also pass the germs that cause meningitis to her baby during birth.

Meningitis can be hard to diagnose because many of the early symptoms match those of the flu. The most common symptoms are fever, vomiting, headaches, stiff neck, sensitivity to light, drowsiness, and muscle pain. Babies may also develop a rash, have a lack of appetite and seem more irritable.

The best way to protect your child from meningitis is to make sure he or she gets all the standard immunizations for children, including shots for measles, chickenpox, and pneumococcal infection. When children reach adolescence, it is recommended that they receive two doses of a meningococcal vaccine to prevent bacterial meningitis.

Jamaica Hospital encourages everyone to know the symptoms of meningitis and speak to their doctor about the meningitis vaccine.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Cancers besides Lung Cancer Linked to Smoking

Cancer

Studies have found that tobacco use is responsible for 30 percent of all cancer deaths in the United States.

It is common knowledge that lung cancer is one of the leading causes of death among smokers; however, smoking tobacco is also linked to the development of other life-threatening forms of the disease.    Besides lung cancer, tobacco smoke also increases the risk for cancers of the pancreas, esophagus, throat, kidney, mouth and cervix to develop.

It is more likely for cancer to spread throughout the body of a smoker than a non–smoker because:

  1. The toxins found in cigarettes weaken the immune system, making it difficult for the body to fight cancer cells and prevent them from growing.
  2. These poisons can alter or damage the DNA of cells. When a cell’s DNA is damaged, it is not able to function properly and can begin to grow out of control.

A smoker can reduce their risk of developing cancer simply by quitting.  Research indicates that within five years of quitting, a person can lower their risk of getting cancer of the bladder, esophagus, and throat by as much as 50 percent.  After ten years of quitting the risk of dying from lung cancer can also be reduced by half.

The journey to quit smoking can be difficult, but you do not have to do it alone. Jamaica Hospital’s smoking cessation team wants to help you develop a plan leading to your “quit day”.  Our hospital has partnered with the American Lung Association to bring you Freedom from Smoking, a comprehensive and successful group-based smoking cessation program, for more information call 718-206-8494.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

National Donate Life Month

Donation box

At this moment, more than 10,000 New Yorkers are currently waiting for a lifesaving organ. Every 18 hours a New Yorker dies while waiting for an organ transplant. Every two and a half hours a person’s name is added to the New York State organ transplant waiting list. Each of these people is in desperate need of a chance to keep living. More than 6,500 people a year, about 21 a day, die before that organ ever becomes available. These statistics determine that it is time for a change, more than 90% of New Yorkers support organ donation, but only 25% are registered.

One organ donor can save up to eight lives. Thanks to organ donation, more than 2 million years of life have been saved. National Donate Life Month (NDLM) was instituted by Donate Life America in 2003, to be celebrated in April each year. NDLM features an entire month of local, regional and national activities to help encourage Americans to register as organ, eye and tissue donors and to celebrate those that have saved lives through the gift of donation.

It can be hard to think about what’s going to happen to your body after you die, let alone donating your organs and tissue. However, being an organ donor is a generous and worthwhile decision that can be a lifesaver. One organ donor can save up to eight lives and enhance the lives of up to 50 through tissue donation. If you’ve never considered organ donation or delayed becoming a donor because of possibly inaccurate information, here are answers to some common organ donation myths and concerns.

  • There is not an age limit to organ donation. The oldest donor in the U.S. was 93 years old.
  • Each case is considered for medical suitability for donation after death has been declared. Saving the patient’s life is the health care provider’s main concern and doctors will do everything they can to save you.
  • Donation is only an option after all attempts to save the patient have failed.
  • It is also a common belief that organ donation contradicts many religions. Most major religions actively support organ donation including Judaism, Buddhism, Islam, Christianity, Taoism and more.

Please join Jamaica Hospital, LiveOnNY and special guest Queens Borough President Melinda Katz as we celebrate National Donate Life Month. Together we are raising awareness about the importance of organ donation. On Wednesday, April 20th, inside of the Jamaica Hospital lobby at 12:30 pm you can register to save a life by becoming an organ donor. Representatives from LiveOnNY will be available at the event to provide information about organ donation and assist with enrollment in the New York State Donor Registry. Probably the greatest benefit of organ donation is knowing that you’re saving a life. For more information, please call 718-206-6020.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Donate Life Month

Organ donor word cloudApril is National Donate Life Month, a month dedicated to celebrating the lives of people saved by organ donation and the donors who made a difference. In 2015, over 30,000 lives in the United States were saved thanks to the men and women who decided to give the gift of life.

During National Donate Life Month, organizations such as LiveOnNY carry out missions or campaigns to educate communities about the importance of organ donation.  These initiatives are very important because they address many concerns people may have about becoming a donor, such as:

  • Religion- Most major religions such as Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam and others are in support of organ donation.
  • Age – If you have been given approval by your doctor to be a donor, you are never too old. The oldest person in the U.S. on record to be a donor was 93 years old.
  • Health conditions- It is important that you do not rule yourself out as donor due to medical conditions. Each case is different.
  • Premature death- The primary goal of doctors is to save your life. Donation is only considered when all efforts to save a patient’s life have failed.

Jamaica Hospital is encouraging people to help play a role in saving or improving lives by registering as organ donors.   Research shows that 90 percent of New Yorkers support organ donation but only 25 percent are registered.  By registering, you can make a difference and help save up to eight lives.

For more information please visit www.LiveOnNY.org

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

World Immunization Week

Vaccinate written in chalk on a chalkboard on a rustic background

The last week in April is recognized by the World Health Organization (WHO) as World Immunization Week.  Its purpose is to raise public awareness of how immunization saves lives.  Many events are held to encourage people to vaccinate themselves or their children against vaccine-preventable diseases.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), immunization averts an estimated 2 to 3 million deaths every year.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have noted several important milestones which have already been reached in controlling vaccine-preventable diseases among infants worldwide.

It is easy to think of vaccine- preventable diseases as diseases of the past; or not happening in our country, but the truth is they can and do happen in the United States.

The World Health Organization encourages health partners to join the 2016 plan to help raise awareness about the importance of immunization.

Some key facts you need to know about the benefits of immunizations are:

  • Immunization prevents illness, disability and death from cervical cancer, diphtheria, hepatitis B, measles, mumps, pertussis (whooping cough), pneumonia, polio, rotavirus diarrhea, rubella and tetanus.
  • Uptake of new and underused vaccines is increasing.
  • An estimated 18.7 million infants worldwide are still missing out on basic vaccines.

If you would like to learn more about the benefits of immunizations, please contact Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center at 718-206-7001 for an appointment.

For more information about World Immunization Week 2016, please visit

http://www.who.int/campaigns/immunization-week/2016/event/en/

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Teaching a Baby to Walk

Father teaching a baby to walk in bedroom

Father teaching a baby to walk in bedroom

One of the major milestones in a child’s life is the day they take those first steps. Every child is different and though most children take their first steps around the time of their first birthday, it can occur as early as nine months or as late as 18 months. Babies are so busy learning all kinds of skills, and they develop at different times, but usually before their 18th month they show signs of being able to walk.
Some early signs of getting ready to walk are:
• Crawling
• Rolling around
• Standing
• Using arms and legs to move around
By placing a baby on their tummy regularly, they should begin to lift their heads and begin to strengthen their back muscles. This is also important for preparing the body to stand upright and to begin walking.
Teaching a baby to walk requires a lot of patience, and every child will learn at their own pace. Walking requires learning to balance, becoming coordinated, building confidence, and strengthening the muscles in the arms and legs. Every baby learns differently.  One way to start is by holding the baby under their arms and allowing them to bounce either on your lap or against a hard surface. This will help to strengthen their leg muscles and also teach them how to bend their knees. You can arrange furniture in a way that they can hold on to something as they go across a room.
Once a baby is able to stand upright, let them hold on to a low table and move around on their own slowly. You can hold both of their hands and let them take steps, and after some practice, you can let go of one hand so they feel a little independence.
It is recommended that you not put the baby in a walker. Many people over the years have used them because they are relatively easy and their children turned out just fine but child development experts don’t recommend them.  They have been banned in Canada and the American Academy of Pediatrics in the United States is trying to have them banned as well because of the high incidence of injuries that they are responsible for.
It is important to take safety precautions when there is a baby learning to walk in the house. These include:
• Remove tables and objects with sharp edges
• Cover electric outlets
• Remove objects from table tops that can be grabbed
• Child proof cabinets and doors
• Be careful of electric cords
• Remove rugs that they can slip on
Get a toddler toy that the child can push or pull that will make walking something fun to do. As they gain confidence, they will want to walk at every opportunity they can get.
Word to the wise, once a baby learns to walk, you will need to keep a close eye on their every movement because they tend to look at this new freedom as a game to keep you on your toes.
If your child doesn’t show any signs of trying to move themselves around by the first birthday, speak to your pediatrician about these important milestones. To schedule an appointment with a pediatrician at Jamaica Hospital please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.