Can Aspirin Trigger and Asthma Attack ?

aspirin-225x300Aspirin may have many benefits but for people who have asthma, it can trigger an attack. In fact, it is estimated that approximately 10 – 20 % of people who live with asthma have a reaction to either aspirin or other pain killers called non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS).  Examples of NSAIDS are Ibuprofen, Motrin, Advil, Naproxen, Aleve, and Naprosyn.
The likelihood of having an asthmatic attack is increased if a person living with asthma has nasal polyps in addition to sensitivity to aspirin. This condition, known as Samter’s Triad increases the chances of having an asthmatic attack by 30 – 40 %. This is due to the fact that nasal polyps are an inflammatory condition in the nasal passages and anti-inflammatories can lead to respiratory complications. Many people with nasal symptoms such as runny nose, post nasal drip, and congestion may be prone to an asthma attack if they take aspirin or NSAIDS.
If you suspect that you have asthma and are experiencing: shortness of breath, wheezing and coughing, speak to your doctor about how aspirin can impact your condition. A doctor can recommend medications that are safer to take. To make an appointment at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Natural Ways to Revive Your Skin This Spring

skin -78634418Now that winter is over and the days are getting warmer, you are probably going to wear clothing that shows more of your skin.   Unfortunately for many of us the cold and dry winter months has taken a toll, leaving our skin dry, cracked and dull- just simply not at its best.   The good news is you can help revive your skin and bring back its beauty by doing the following:

  1. Exfoliate –Exfoliating helps remove dry and dead skin cells from the surface. The benefits of exfoliation include an increase in cell turnover, healthier skin cells, improved texture, softer and brighter skin. It is recommended that you exfoliate once or twice a week but each individual is different and should consult a dermatologist about frequency. Using a home-made body scrub is one of the ways you can exfoliate.  The most popular scrubs that can be made at home are salt or brown sugar scrubs combined with oils such as coconut, olive or grapeseed.
  2. Moisturize-It is likely that winter has depleted moisture from your skin. Replace moisture by using honey; which is loaded with antioxidants, oils such as olive oil or believe it or not yogurt. It is suggested that you apply yogurt to skin, leave it on for 10 minutes then wash it off to reveal skin that looks refreshed. Applying hydrating masks to the face can help with suppleness. You can include natural moisturizing ingredients such as avocado or bananas in your mask.
  3. More water- Water is good for skin because it combats dehydration, which can make your skin appear drier. Keeping hydrated helps your organs to work better, this includes your biggest organ- your skin. Eating foods with high water content such apples or melons can also help with hydration.

Following these after-winter skin care tips can help you in putting your best spring skin forward; however, it is strongly recommended that you speak with a physician before trying them; especially if you have food allergies or chronic illnesses such as diabetes or hypertension.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Zika

According to the Centers for Disease, Control and Prevention, the Zika virus is spread to people primarily through the bite of an infected Aedes species mosquito.  The most common symptoms of Zika are fever, rash, joint pain and conjunctivitis.

Most recently, the Zika virus has been linked to microcephaly in babies of mother’s who contracted the virus during pregnancy. Microcephaly is a condition where a baby’s brain with microcephaly does not develop properly during the pregnancy or has stopped growing after birth, this results in a smaller sized head.

What we DO know:

  • Zika virus can be passed from pregnant women to their fetus during pregnancy or at delivery.
  • Pregnant women can be infected with the Zika virus through the bite of an infected mosquito
  • You can become infected by a male sex partner
  • Pregnant women should not travel to areas affected by Zika
  • Based on available evidence, the Zika virus infection in a woman who is not pregnant would not pose a risk for birth defects in future pregnancies after the virus has cleared from her blood.

What we DO NOT know:

  • How likely a pregnant woman who has been exposed to Zika will get the virus
  • How the virus will affect her pregnancy or how likely it is that Zika will pass to her fetus
  • If the infected fetus will develop other birth defects or when in the pregnancy the infection might cause harm to the fetus
  • If sexual transmission of Zika virus poses a different risk of birth defects that mosquito-borne transmission

If you must travel to Zika areas affected by Zika, speak with your healthcare provider about the risks of Zika Virus before you travel.  Learn how to protect yourself from mosquito bites and try to avoid regions where Zika is present.

If you have traveled to a region where Zika is present and are pregnant, talk to your health care provider about Zika symptoms. If you would like to speak with a physician, you can make an appointment at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Women’s Health Center, call 718-291-3276.

For more FAQ’s on Zika Virus you will find the following websites helpful –www.health.ny.gov/diseases/zika_virus/

http://www.cdc.gov/zika/

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Is Social Media Making Me Fat?

Have you ever wondered why when you see postings of food on social media that are pleasing to your eyes, you immediately begin to desire that food or think, “Gee, I’m hungry?

The human mind is divided into two parts, the conscious and subconscious mind.  The conscious mind works while we are awake, while the subconscious mind is always activated.  The subconscious mind regulates everything in our body, our character, our speech and receives and processes information. The food and beverage postings on social media speak directly to our conscious and subconscious mind.

According to researchers, 70 percent of household meals in America are influenced by digital media.  Pictures of food and beverages show up on news feeds 63 percent of the time.  One popular social media site noted that a widely used food hashtag marked photos of snacks and meals 54 million times on their site alone.

In addition to subliminally causing you to want to eat more food, studies have shown that people who spent two hours or more using a device with LED display, such as a smart phone or tablet, had a corresponding dip in melatonin levels.  Melatonin is the chemical that prepares your body for sleep. When we lose sleep, we can pack on extra pounds because there is a link between sleep loss and weight gain.  If you are awake for longer periods of time, you may be more inclined to reach for a late night snack or bag of chips.

Some steps you can take to curb your hunger and promote good health are:

  • Choose fresh, whole foods like fruits, vegetables, and lean meats.
  • Prepare your meals at home and limit dining out and processed on-the-go meals.
  • Try to avoid being distracted by TV, work, driving or surfing on your computer, phone or tablet while eating.
  • Regulate your social media feed, especially if the pictures of food and beverages make your stomach moan.

Obesity is on the rise because many factors, but keep in mind that you are in control and can make healthy choices to live a healthy life. It’s better to eat with your stomach and not with your eyes.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Liver Cirrhosis: Symptoms and Treatment

Cirrhosis is a slowly progressing disease in which healthy liver tissue is replaced with scar tissue, eventually preventing the liver from functioning properly. The scar tissue blocks the flow of blood through the liver and slows the processing of nutrients, hormones, drugs, and naturally produced toxins. It also slows the production of proteins and other substances made by the liver. According to the National Institutes of Health, cirrhosis is the twelfth leading cause of death by disease.

The symptoms of cirrhosis of the liver vary with the stage of the illness. In the beginning stages, there may not be any symptoms. As the disease worsens, symptoms may include:

  • Loss of appetite
  • Lack of energy (fatigue), which may be debilitating
  • Weight loss or sudden weight gain
  • Bruises
  • Yellowing of skin or the whites of eyes (jaundice)
  • Itchy skin
  • Fluid retention (edema) and swelling in the ankles, legs, and abdomen (often an early sign)
  • A brownish or orange tint to the urine
  • Light colored stools
  • Confusion, disorientation, personality changes
  • Blood in the stool
  • Fever

Cirrhosis of the liver can be diagnosed through a physical exam, blood tests, biopsy and surgery. During a physical exam, your doctor can observe changes in how your liver feels or how large it is (a cirrhotic liver is bumpy and irregular instead of smooth). If your doctor suspects cirrhosis, you will be given blood tests to find out if liver disease is present. In some cases, cirrhosis is diagnosed during surgery when the doctor is able to see the entire liver. The liver also can be inspected through a laparoscope, a viewing device that is inserted through a tiny incision in the abdomen.

Although there is no cure for cirrhosis of the liver, there are treatments available that can stop or delay its progress, minimize the damage to liver cells, and reduce complications. For cirrhosis caused by alcohol abuse, the person must stop drinking alcohol to halt the progression of cirrhosis. Medications may be given to control the symptoms of cirrhosis. Liver transplantation may be needed for some people with severe cirrhosis.

If you are experiencing any symptoms of liver cirrhosis schedule an appointment with your doctor immediately. The Department of Gastroenterology at Jamaica Hospital specializes in the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders. To schedule an appointment, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

March is National Colon Cancer Awareness Month

In 2000, President Clinton officially dedicated March as National Colon Cancer Awareness Month. This designation provides patients, survivors, caregivers and advocates throughout the country an opportunity to join together to raise awareness about colon cancer and the importance of early detection.

ThinkstockPhotos-474824404The American Cancer Society recommends that men and women with an average risk of developing colon cancer be tested beginning at age 50. People with certain risk factors, such as a family history of colon cancer or a history of inflammatory bowel disease should be tested earlier.

Early detection can save lives, but unfortunately, less than half of the people age 50 and older get tested for colon cancer. Colorectal cancer is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer and second leading cause of cancer death in the U.S., yet there is a 90 percent cure rate when detected early.

There are a variety of different tests used to diagnose colon cancer. They include:

Standard (or optical) colonoscopy – During this test, the rectum and entire colon are examined using a colonoscope, a flexible lighted tube with a lens for viewing and tool for removing tissue. During a colonoscopy, any abnormal growths in the colon and rectum can be removed.

Sigmoidoscopy – During this test, the rectum and the sigmoid colon are examined using a sigmoidascope. The instrument is inserted through the anus and into the rectum and sigmoid colon as air is passed pumped into the colon to expand it so the doctor can see it more clearly.

High-sensitivity fecal occult blood tests (FOBT) – This exam checks for tiny amounts of blood in feces (stool) that cannot be seen by the naked eye. The stool samples are collected by the patient and the doctor has the samples tested.

Speak with your doctor about when to begin screening for colorectal cancer and what test(s) are best for you. If you do not have a doctor, Jamaica Hospital’s Ambulatory Care Center has doctors that can help. For more information, or to schedule an appointment, call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Poison Prevention Week Tips

poison prevention -494095014This week, March 19th-25th is Poison Prevention Week. Did you know that every year more than 2 million poison-related injuries and deaths are reported in the United States and more than 90 percent of these cases occur in the home?

The majority of poison-related accidents occurs among children but can be prevented by taking the proper precautions to store, dispose or conceal items that contribute to these incidents.

The following safety tips are recommended by The American Association of Poison Control Centers and can help you reduce the risk of an accident your home:

  1. Place the Poison Help number in a place that is easily accessible or in eyesight. That number is 1 (800) 222-1222. Calls are free, confidential, and answered by experts at all times.
  2. Safely store these substances in cabinets with child-proof locks or in child- resistant containers:
  • Medications
  • Vitamins
  • Tobacco products, especially liquid nicotine
  • Laundry and cleaning supplies
  • Alcohol
  • Pesticides or insect repellants
  • Hand sanitizers
  • Small batteries
  1. Read medication labels properly before administering.
  2. Never call medication “candy” to encourage children to take it.
  3. Avoid taking medications in front of young children.
  4. Do not use food storage containers to store harmful products such as detergents or pesticides.

While practicing these guidelines should be routine, we invite you to use Poison Prevention Awareness Week as a reminder to ensure that your home is poison safe.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Hey, I Thought This Was Healthy

ThinkstockPhotos-469994052

Optimal health is a goal for many but is sometimes easier said than done. In this day and age there are so many diet fads and new health trends that inspire us for a moment and create shortcuts to a seemingly healthy lifestyle. However, everything that might seem good for you can actually be bad for you. Let’s take a look at some popular health beverages that are actually junk food in disguise.

  1. Fruit Juices

When you go to the supermarket you see a lot of juices that claim to have 100% fruit juice. That must be healthy because it comes from a fruit right? Wrong. A lot of the fruit juice is not really fruit juice. Sometimes there isn’t even any actual fruit in there, just chemicals that taste like fruit. What you’re drinking is basically just fruit-flavored sugar water. Fruit juice is like fruit, except with all the good stuff (like the fiber) taken out, only leaving you with sugar.

  1. Sports Drinks

Sports drinks were designed with athletes in mind. Whether you are committing to a steady workout routine or joining a local sports team to stay in shape, you might grab a sports drink every once in a while to stay hydrated. These drinks contain electrolytes (salts) and sugar, which can be useful for athletes in many cases. However, most regular people don’t need any additional salts, and they certainly have no need for liquid sugar. Although often considered “less bad” than sugary soft drinks, there really is no fundamental difference except that the sugar content is sometimes slightly lower. It is important to stay hydrated, especially around workouts, but most people will be better off sticking to plain water.

  1. Smoothies

Smoothies have long been the darling of the health-food world. Although some smoothies made with simple, whole-food ingredients can be healthy, don’t get fooled into thinking anything with the name “smoothie” is good for you. Some smoothies are made with lots of added sugars, high-calorie ingredients like chocolate syrup, or even use full-fat ice cream as a base. Your best smoothie bet? Make one at home so that you know exactly what’s in it.

 

  1. Diet Sodas

The word “diet” doesn’t always equal healthy, and that’s certainly the case for diet soda. Made with artificial ingredients and flavorings, it’s not only unnatural and high in sodium, but regular diet soda drinkers have been shown to eat more calories after consuming diet cola. While the reasons aren’t fully understood, researchers suspect it’s the body’s way of making up for calories it thinks it received in the diet soda but didn’t.

Today we learned that foods that look good for us are not always the best for us. If you saw some of your favorite beverages on here remember that the fresh way is the best way! Carefully read all of your labels before consumption and look out for liquids that are high in sugars, fats and sodium.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

World TB Day

TBMarch 24th has been designated globally as “World TB Day”. The event began in 1982 is sponsored by the World Health Organization and the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease and is intended to raise awareness that anyone can contract TB to make health professionals aware of the importance of testing people for the disease.
This date was chosen to celebrate  the discovery by Dr. Robert Koch of the Mycobacterium tuberculoisis (the bacteria that causes tuberculosis) in 1882. This important discovery was the beginning of the steps being taken to control and hopefully one day eradicate the disease. Unfortunately, TB is still one of the leading causes of death around the world.
Tuberculosis (TB) is a contagious bacterial disease that affects mainly the lungs but can also affect the kidneys, brain and the spine.  Signs and symptoms may include:
• Coughing up blood
• Fatigue
• Fever
• Chills
• Night sweats
• Loss of appetite
• Pain with breathing
TB is spread by coming into contact with the airborne droplets  of the bacteria from an infected person. People most susceptible are those who have compromised immune systems and  include people undergoing chemotherapy, have diabetes, are very young or very old, and have HIV/AIDS. There are antibiotics that given to fight the disease but depending on the strain and their resistance to treatment, may require months or years of treatment.
A routine physical usually includes a TB skin test. If you would like to schedule a physical exam and a TB test with one of our physicians, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Do You Stop at a “Stop” sign?

DStop Signo you “Stop” at a stop sign? For some people it means a slow roll through an intersection, for some it is a mere tap on the brakes, for others it may seem like  five minutes, especially if you are in a hurry and in the car behind  them.
A stop sign means exactly what it says “STOP”,  the wheels on the vehicle must  come to a complete halt, and remain at the intersection until it is your turn to proceed  safely.
Under New York State law, a motorist must come to a full and complete stop at a stop sign at either:
• A clearly marked stop line
• Before entering a crosswalk
• Before entering an intersection with a stop sign at the point that gives you a view of traffic on the intersecting roadway.
• At an intersection marked with a stop sign, the operator of the motor vehicle may proceed only after giving the right of way to a vehicle that already has entered the intersection, or when the intersection is free of pedestrians.
Unfortunately many accidents occur because operators of motor vehicles fail to observe stop signs. If an intersection looks clear, drivers will sometimes just slow down at a stop sign or not even bother to do even that. Failure to obey traffic signs is a violation and can be subject to a monetary fine and other disciplinary action.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.