Can Journaling Help Relieve Stress and Anxiety

Did you know that keeping a journal is a great tool for relieving anxiety and stress?  According to Verywellmind.com, “Journaling can relieve stress by helping you work through your anxious feelings.”

By journaling, you can minimize thoughts that may have you anxious.  Writing down what is causing you to stress may help you shift feelings of fear and hopelessness to empowerment and solution orientated thoughts.

Some tips on how to get started are:

  • Start journaling for five to 15 minutes – Too much time shouldn’t be spent on your journaling. Write about what is concerning you most.
  • If an event is currently causing difficulty write it down in detail. If it is not a current issue, but something that has been plaguing you, focus on writing that you worry about the “what could possibly happen” factor.
  • Write how these feelings affect you in your daily life
  • Once your thoughts are arranged, you can write about what positive measures you can implement to help relive how you are feeling (i.e. meditation, exercise, support groups)

The hardest part about journaling is getting started.  Many people think that they don’t have the time to journal, but if you have the time to fret, you have the time to put pencil to paper and work on feeling better!

For more tips on how to benefit from journaling visit – www.verywellmind.com

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Running Do’s and Don’ts

It is no secret that exercise does wonders for your health.  Running, in particular, offers many benefits, and is known to improve your mental and physical wellbeing.

In a study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, it was found that” five to 10 minutes a day of low-intensity running is enough to extend life by several years.” Similar studies have also indicated that running can help reduce the risks associated with obesity, diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure and some cancers.

Given the benefits, your doctor may recommend that you include running as part of your exercise regimen. If you decide to run, there are a few things you should keep in mind in order to prevent injury and optimize your workout. Here are some running dos and don’ts:

The Do’s:

  • Keep your head up -This will keep your body in alignment and prevent injuries
  • Stretch and warm up-This reduces muscle tightness and increases your range of motion
  • Start slowly -Starting off too fast can lead to overexertion which may result in side aches
  • Schedule rest days –Allow your body days to recover and reduce the risk of exhaustion
  • Remain hydrated- Drinking enough water will prevent dehydration

The Don’ts:

  • Do not run in shoes that are worn or not intended for running- Shoes that are worn or not designed for running may lack support and lead to injuries
  • If running outdoors, do not run with headphones – It is important to be aware of your surroundings and avoid hazards
  • Do not eat big meals before running-Eating too much can slow you down
  • Do not ignore injuries- It is important that you rest if you are injured, not doing so can lead to complications

The most important thing to consider before starting your running routine is to speak with your doctor. Experts recommend that you receive a full medical checkup if you are over the age of 40, have preexisting medical conditions, are obese or have a family history of heart disease.  Your doctor will be able to assess your health and determine if running is best for you.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

What Causes Night Sweats?

A common concern shared by patients with their doctor is night sweats.  This is the occurrence of excessive sweating at night while sleeping.

If you are experiencing night sweats while sleeping in a warm room, wearing too much clothing to bed or sleeping with too many blankets, the cause for excessive perspiration is most likely the result of your sleep environment.

However, if neither applies and you are experiencing night sweats frequently, there is a chance that this may be caused by an underlying medical issue.

There are several conditions that are known to cause night sweats, some of these are:

  • Hormone disorders
  • Cancers
  • Stroke
  • Infections
  • Anxiety disorders
  • Menopause
  • Hypoglycemia
  • Idiopathic hyperhidrosis
  • Thyroid diseases

Certain medications are also known to cause night sweats. You should speak with your doctor if night sweats:

  • Occur on a regular basis
  • Are accompanied by symptoms such as fever or pain
  • Occur after menopausal symptoms have subsided after several months
  • Interrupts your sleep

To schedule an appointment with a doctor at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call   718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Can you get the flu in the summer?

FluAlthough it is possible to get the flu during the summer, it is highly unlikely that you will.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) explains that while influenza viruses circulate year-round, they are most common during fall and winter months.   These viruses survive better in colder and drier climates. Therefore the chances that you will get the flu in the summer, which consists of hot and humid conditions, are greatly reduced.

Flu-like symptoms that occur during the summer are most likely caused by other illnesses. Some illnesses that present very similar symptoms to the flu include:

  • The common cold – symptoms include sore throat, coughing, sneezing and congestion
  • Pneumonia-symptoms include fever, headaches, chills and coughing
  • Gastroenteritis- symptoms include body  aches, pain, fever, headaches  along with diarrhea and abdominal cramps
  • Bronchitis- symptoms include fatigue, coughing, fever, chills and shortness of breath

Getting the flu during the summer is unusual but possible.  If you suspect that you have the flu or are experiencing the aforementioned symptoms, it is advised that you see your doctor.  He or she will conduct an examination and order tests to determine all possible causes for your symptoms as well as appropriate treatment methods.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Treating A Bee Sting

One of the things we least look forward to while enjoying summer weather is being stung by a bee.  In the event that this happens, you should know how to properly treat stings.

Treating bee stings depends on severity. People who are allergic or people who have received multiple stings should seek immediate emergency care. However, if you are not allergic, and have not received multiple stings, you can do the following to relieve pain and swelling:

  • Remove the stinger as soon as possible, in any way that you can ( using tweezers or your fingernails are some ways that you can)
  • Wash the area with soap and water
  • Apply ice or cold compress to reduce swelling
  • Take an over-the-counter pain reliever as instructed
  • Apply hydrocortisone cream, calamine lotion  or take oral antihistamines to relieve itching or swelling

If you have a severe reaction to a bee sting, go to the nearest hospital Emergency Room or call 911.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Safely Grilling Food Outdoors

Summertime is a popular time of year for outdoor grilling. Food that is grilled outdoors always seems to delight our family and friends, but if we don’t practice proper food safety, people could get food poisoning.

Here are some tips to keep in mind when grilling food in order to avoid food poisoning:
• Always make sure the utensils you are using are clean before and after you use them
• Keep raw food away from cooked food by using separate plates
• Wash hands thoroughly with soap and water after touching uncooked food
• Use a meat thermometer to ensure that meat is cooked at the right temperature
145 degrees for whole beef, pork, veal, lamb
145 degrees for fish
160 degrees for hamburgers and ground beef
165 degrees for poultry and hot dogs
• Check the date on the meat package to ensure it is fresh when you buy it
• Don’t leave raw meat or poultry out at room temperature for more than two hours
• Keep uncooked meat refrigerated at 40 degrees Fahrenheit or lower
• After food is cooked, keep it hot until served at 140 degrees Fahrenheit or hotter
• Wash all of the utensils used for grilling after you are done with them
• Do not partially cook food and finish it later
• Keep food out of direct sunlight
• Use a meat thermometer to ensure that meat is cooked at the right temperature

• By following these simple tips, you will ensure a wonderful meal will be enjoyed by everyone.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Common Summer Illnesses

Typically when we think of seasonal illnesses, we think of conditions such as allergies, the cold and flu as they relate to winter, spring and fall months. However, it is important for us to remember certain illnesses are more likely to occur during the summer than at other times of the year.

Although the summer provides us with lots of sunshine and opportunities to enjoy recreational activities, warmer temperatures and elements of our environment can increase our risk of exposure to factors that affect our health.

Hot weather provides the perfect climate for bacteria to grow that causes food poisoning. Therefore, we have to be especially careful during summer months to make sure our food is stored and prepared correctly to avoid illness.

A favorite summer past time for many is swimming; however, the bodies of water in which we swim can serve as the perfect breeding ground for bacteria that causes recreational water illnesses (RWI) and can lead to gastrointestinal problems such as diarrhea.  We also have to be mindful of properly draining or drying our ears after swimming, as this can encourage bacteria to grow, potentially leading to an infection known as swimmer’s ear.

Lyme disease is a tick-borne illness that peaks during the summer months when we are more exposed to ticks in wooded or grassy areas.   Therefore it is important to take the proper precautions to prevent tick bites while we are participating in outdoor activities such as hiking.

Coxsackie is a common summer virus that mostly affects children. The hand, foot and mouth disease is spread from person-to-person by saliva, blister fluid, feces and mucus.  Outbreaks peak in the summer; however, you can control the spread of the virus by frequently washing hands and cleaning surfaces that children touch most often.

Summer heat and places of recreation can provide the perfect environment for illness-causing bacteria and viruses to flourish.  Remember while soaking up the sunshine or lying by the lake to take the proper steps to reduce your chances of getting sick.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Motion Sickness

Motion sickness is a common condition that many of us experience at some point in our lives. It is the feeling of nausea, dizziness or uneasiness that can develop during a bumpy or rocky ride. For some, this sensation may occur while traveling in a car, boat, train, plane or other modes of transportation.

Motion sickness also referred to as seasickness, carsickness or airsickness is caused when the brain receives mixed signals from our balance-sensing system which consists of our eyes, inner ear (semicircular canals) and sensory nerves.    Mixed signals are received by the brain because your eyes cannot see the motion your body is feeling, or conversely, your body cannot feel the motion your eyes are seeing. Motion sickness can start suddenly, typically with a feeling of uneasiness then progressing to other symptoms such as dizziness, a cold sweat, headaches or vomiting.

Children and pregnant women are most susceptible to motion sickness. However, anyone who is traveling can be at risk. Factors that can increase the chances for symptoms to appear include poor ventilation in a vehicle, the type of vehicle, fears or anxieties about traveling or the orientation in which a person is sitting or standing.

Treatment for motion sickness may include medication, home remedies or applying simple changes to your environment. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), recommends the following interventions for treatment or prevention:

  • Being aware of and avoiding situations that tend to trigger symptoms.
  • Optimizing position to reduce motion or motion perception—for example, driving a vehicle instead of riding in it, sitting in the front seat of a car or bus, sitting over the wing of an aircraft, holding the head firmly against the back of the seat, and choosing a window seat on flights and trains.
  • Reducing sensory input—lying prone, shutting eyes, sleeping, or looking at the horizon.
  • Maintaining hydration by drinking water, eating small meals frequently, and limiting alcoholic and caffeinated beverages.
  • Avoiding smoking—even short-term cessation reduces susceptibility to motion sickness.
  • Adding distractions—controlling breathing, listening to music, or using aromatherapy scents such as mint or lavender. Flavored lozenges may also help.
  • Using acupressure or magnets is advocated by some to prevent or treat nausea, although scientific data on efficacy of these interventions for preventing motion sickness are lacking.
  • Gradually exposing oneself to continuous or repeated motion sickness triggers. Most people, in time, notice a reduction in motion sickness symptoms.

Most cases of motion sickness are mild. Symptoms are typically self-treatable or go away when a person is no longer in motion.  However, medical professionals recommend that you see a doctor if you experience motion sickness repeatedly or if symptoms persist after your journey.

To schedule an appointment with a doctor at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Tips for Traveling With Medication

Preparing for a flight often requires careful planning and packing. When traveling with medication, knowing airport rules ahead of time can help you to pack correctly and minimize setbacks on your trip.

It is important that you follow these tips provided by the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) to avoid delays in your travel time or confiscation of your medication:

  • Confirm that your prescription is legal at your destination; some medications that are allowed in the United States are prohibited in other countries.
  • Learn state requirements for the labeling of prescription medication. States have individual laws of which travelers must comply.
  • You can bring unlimited amounts of your medication in pill or solid form, as long as it is screened. Medications are typically screened by X-ray; however, if you do want them X-rayed you may ask to have them inspected instead. This request must be made before your medication enters the X-ray tunnel.
  • You are allowed to bring liquid medication in carry-on bags in excess of 3.4 ounces in reasonable quantities.
  • If traveling with liquid medication, you must inform the inspecting officer at the start of the screening checkpoint process. Additional screening will be required and you may be asked to open the container.
  • Supplies associated with medication such as syringes, pumps, IV bags or needles must undergo screening.

Packing appropriately for your trip can make traveling with medication less complicated. It is highly recommended that you check the TSA’s website, www.tsa.gov, for updates as the current rules can change.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

To Juice or Not to Juice? That is the Question.

Juicing or juice cleanses are growing in popularity as more people are using this practice as a way to lose weight or improve their health.  Juice bars are becoming a common fixture in shopping malls as the demand for freshly-made and all-natural juices increase.  There are a few advantages that can be achieved by juicing.

Some advantages of juicing include:

  • Juicing may be an easier way for some to obtain the daily fruits and vegetables that are essential in maintaining a healthy diet. Many people find it more convenient and less time consuming to drink fruits and vegetables instead of eating them.
  • Juicing can help in promoting weight loss- if it is done correctly and the body is not deprived of vital nutrients and fibers.

There also disadvantages associated with all-juice diets. The disadvantages that are associated with all-juice diets include:

  • An all-juice diet for a prolonged period of time is not recommended as studies have shown that LDL cholesterol levels may increase. Depriving the body of whole foods that are rich in nutrients could also weaken its ability to fight infections and function properly.
  • Juicing can prove dangerous for individuals with chronic health conditions such as diabetes and kidney disease. High levels of fructose, which is the sugar found in fruits can elevate blood sugar levels.  Excessive juicing can cause high levels of potassium and minerals to build up in the blood- this can become hazardous if one has kidney disease.
  • Juicing may not be the healthiest or most effective way to lose weight as your body may think it is starving and lower its metabolic rate. If your body is being deprived of the daily recommended caloric intake it could begin to burn muscle tissue instead of fat to provide energy, causing the loss of muscle mass.

If you choose to juice, consult your physician, especially if you have chronic health conditions and juice in moderation. Juicing can be beneficial if it is done properly and is supplemented with nutrient-rich whole foods. It is recommended that a glass of juice can be used to substitute one meal for example breakfast or lunch for the day. Most healthcare practitioners caution that juicing should not surpass the duration of a few days.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.