HPV

Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is considered to be the most commonly transmitted sexually related disease in the United States. It is a virus that is transmitted from one person to another during sexual contact. It affects both sexes, but usually the rate of infection is twice as high for women than for men. While the body has the ability to fight off the disease naturally, most of the time, in some cases it can cause health related problems.  Many people who are infected are not even aware that they have it.
Complications of HPV:
• Genital warts
• Vaginal cancer
• Cervical cancer
• Anal cancer
• Cancer of the penis
• Cancer of the mouth and throat
There is no cure for HPV, usually treatment is for the condition that it causes. There are two vaccines, Cervarix and Gardasil available which can help to prevent the disease. Both will protect against cervical cancers in women, Gardasil will protect against genital warts and cancers of the anus, vulva, and vagina. Gardasil is also available for males. The recommendation is that these vaccines be given to girls and boys at 11 or 12 years of age. Women can get the vaccine up until the age of 27 and men can get the vaccine up to the age of 22.
If you would like to make an appointment with a pediatrician at Jamaica Hospital, please call 718-206-7001.

HPV Vaccine

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Condom Sense: STI Awareness Month

Condom

Sexually transmitted infections (STIs), also known as sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are infections that are spread by sexual contact. April marks National STI Awareness Month, a campaign sparked by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as an effort to counter the nation’s high rates of sexually transmitted infections. The United States currently has the highest rates of sexually transmitted diseases among all countries in the developed world. Here are three important facts to remember about the ongoing public health epidemic in this country:

 

  1. The current epidemic is driven by just two STDs — even though there’s already a vaccine to prevent one of them.

The nation’s STI epidemic is mainly caused by HPV and chlamydia. That’s good and bad news. On one hand, chlamydia is easily cured with antibiotics, and there’s already an extremely effective vaccine to prevent HPV transmission. But young Americans still aren’t getting their HPV shots, even though the CDC urges parents to vaccinate their children — both girls and boys — before they reach their early 20s.

  1. Women disproportionately bear the burden of STIs.

Based on the female anatomy women are actually more vulnerable to contract STDs than men are — but they’re also less likely to notice the symptoms. Signs of an STI are less apparent on female genitalia and women commonly confuse STD symptoms for less serious issues, like a yeast infection. Sexually transmitted infections often have more longer-term consequences for women that can lead to infertility, and pregnant women can pass STDs to their unborn babies.

  1. Having healthcare makes it easier to get tested.

The health care reform law now requires insurance companies to provide reproductive health services free of charge, U.S. citizens are able to receive HIV/AIDS counseling, STD counseling, and HPV testing without a co-pay.

There is a lot of misinformation out there about sex, sexual health and sexually transmitted infections. The best way to prevent STI’s is to not have sexual intercourse but that isn’t realistic for most. However, knowledge of prevention is the second best option. To prevent the transmission of STIs, people need to be taught how to effectively use condoms. Follow this link to learn about proper condom use: https://www.plannedparenthood.org/learn/birth-control/condom . Even adults are sometimes misinformed about the spread of STI’s which is why it is important to communicate openly with your doctor.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.