Protecting Your Children From Youth Sports Overuse Injuries

The days when kids just went out and played seem like a distant memory. Today, more and more kids participate in organized sports that can be very demanding. While keeping your children active has many advantages, there are also some potential risks.

A man with with child playing football on football pitch

The Physical Therapy Department at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center wants to warn parents against children sustaining “overuse injuries.” An overuse injury is damage to a bone, muscle, ligament, or tendon due to repetitive stress without allowing time for the body to heal.

Overuse injuries can lead to problems with the lower back, hips, shins, or heels. In children, overuse injuries are especially dangerous when growth plates are involved. When a growth plate is injured it can affect the size and shape of the bones as children mature.

Organized youth sports, especially when played at a high level, often require year-round commitments, with children spending an increased amount of time on the field or court. Unfortunately, their bodies simply aren’t ready for this level of physical intensity.

To avoid overuse injuries, the Physical Therapy Department at Jamaica Hospital suggest the following tips:

  • Diversification – It is highly recommended that children participate in multiple sports throughout the year instead of just one sport all year around. The variation in activity will give children an opportunity to exercise different muscles.
  • Make Rest a Priority – Your children are still growing and they need their rest. Children should not exceed 10 hours of sports in a week and they should take one to two days off per week. The increased rest will allow their bodies extra time to heal.
  • Don’t Forget to Stretch – Make sure your child’s coach sets aside time before practice to warm-up. All athletes such begin each workout with light activity and concentrated stretching exercises for all major muscle groups.
  • Encourage Children to Speak Up When They are Injured – All youth athletes should tell coaches or parents when they sustain an injury. The quicker injuries are addressed and treated, the quicker they can recover.

Physical therapists can help by determining how or why a current injury occurred as well provide advice to prevent future injuries from taking place. A physical therapist can work with patients by building cardiovascular fitness, muscle strength, endurance, agility and coordination.

Jamaica Hospital offers outpatient physical therapy services. For more information, please call 718-206-7140.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Why Patients With RA Should Be Concerned About Osteoporosis

rheumatoid arthritis Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) not only affects the joints but it can also lead to long-term problems in bone health, such as osteoporosis.

Osteoporosis is a disease which causes bones to become brittle, porous (less dense) and weakened, leaving them susceptible to fractures.  Studies have found that people diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis are at an increased risk of developing osteoporosis.

The reasons why the two are linked are numerous.  Complications of RA, including systemic inflammation, the use of glucocorticoids or corticosteroids and loss of mobility can all further the development of osteoporosis.

People with RA who have developed osteoporosis may not know they have the disease because it often goes undetected until the bones fracture. However, there are several lifestyle changes they can apply to reduce their risk, such as:

  • Eating a diet rich in calcium and vitamin D
  • Taking calcium and vitamin D supplements
  • Getting adequate sunlight to receive vitamin D
  • Exercise (weight bearing exercise)
  • Reducing alcohol consumption
  • Quit smoking
  • Taking recommended bone density tests

It is recommended that you speak with a doctor before making changes as each person’s case is unique. Your doctor may also prescribe medications to treat osteoporosis.

To schedule an appointment with a rheumatologist at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718- 206

 

-6742 or 718-206-7001. The Division of Rheumatology at Jamaica Hospital provides consultations for patients who develop rheumatological disorders, such as osteoarthritis and osteoporosis. There is a twice-monthly arthritis clinic and bone mineral density testing for diagnosing osteoporosis.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

What To Expect and How To Prepare for Your Mammogram

mammogram-516258564Your doctor may have recommended scheduling a mammogram as part of your annual exam or to further examine symptoms you may be experiencing that are relative to cancer. Whatever the reason may be for testing, mammograms can be extremely stressful for many women.

Although the anxiety leading up to the day of your mammogram may be overwhelming it is important not to put off testing.  A mammogram is very effective in the early detection of breast cancer and saves lives.

Knowing what to expect can alleviate some of the anxiety and stress that may occur before and during the process.  Here are few tips to help guide you through the process and make your experience more comfortable:

  1. Preparing for your mammogram. Scheduling your mammogram a week after menstruation is often recommended by physicians because your breasts will be less tender and swollen. It is also recommended that you do not wear deodorants, antiperspirants, lotions, powders or ointments on your chest area because they may show up as abnormalities in your X-rays. Come prepared to remove all garments and jewelry on your upper body. If you have any concerns or symptoms you would like to discuss do not hesitate to do so before the examination. Most importantly, make certain that the facility is accredited by the American College of Radiology and specializes in breast imaging.
  2. The duration of your mammogram. A mammogram typically takes 20 -30 minutes to complete. Times may vary if you have larger breasts, denser breasts or implants. During this time a mammogram technologist will position your breasts on the X-ray machine and compress them each for a few seconds. You may experience some discomfort or pain. Technologists are trained to ensure your privacy and to do their best to make you as comfortable as possible. If the degree of pain is too much, please inform the technologist.
  3. After the test. After images are taken of your breast, their quality will be checked by a technician. If they are not up to standard the technologist will have to re-issue the mammogram. Otherwise, your radiologist will review and interpret the images. The radiologist will look for evidence of cancerous or benign tissues and send a report to your doctor.

If suspicious findings or abnormalities are found in your mammogram, the radiologist or your doctor may recommend another mammogram or breast ultrasound to further investigate their findings.

Jamaica Hospital’s Radiology Department offers a wide variety of state-of-the-art diagnostic and specialty services performed by over 16 board-certified and subspecialty trained radiologists, along with several highly trained and experienced technologists.

With several upgrades and improvements to the department, our patients can now undergo their testing in a new and more comfortable environment. Services offered by the Radiology Department include ultrasound, mammography and MRI.

For more information about the radiology services offered by the hospital or to schedule an appointment, please call the Department of Radiology at 718-206-6039.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

What Parents Should Know About Tonsillitis and Tonsil Removal

tonsilitis-493087660Tonsillitis is one of the most common medical conditions that occur in children. It is caused by bacterial or viral infections of the tonsils and can result in severe inflammation and swelling.

Tonsillitis is often caused by Streptococcus (strep) bacteria.  Other contributors are the influenza virus, enteroviruses, Epstein-Barr virus or adenoviruses.

In addition to the major symptoms of swelling and inflammation, complications due to tonsillitis include:

  • Painful blisters on the throat
  • Ear pain
  • Hoarseness or the loss of one’s voice
  • Bad breath
  • Fever
  • Difficulty swallowing
  • Throat pain
  • Loss of appetite
  • A yellow or white coating of the tonsils
  • Tender lymph nodes on the sides of the neck
  • Drooling

Tonsillitis is typically diagnosed by performing a rapid strep test or throat swab culture.  Depending on severity, a doctor may treat the condition with medication or recommend surgery.

Surgery is often considered the best option when tonsillitis is recurrent, unresponsive to medication or when inflamed tonsils are obstructing airways and other severe complications. The name of the procedure is called a tonsillectomy and is performed to remove the tonsils.

Tonsillectomies can be performed as same-day surgery in an ambulatory surgical setting.  It is done under general anesthesia and may last anywhere from 30-45 minutes. The recovery period is approximately 10 days.

The procedure is one of many performed by highly-trained physicians at the Ambulatory Surgery Unit at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center. The unit’s newly designed pediatric area offers children amenities such as televisions that feature child-friendly movies, toy chests and coloring books. In this area, children now have the option to ride a tricycle into the operating area. Jamaica Hospital’s on-site Ambulatory Surgery Unit is located on the first floor of the hospital. The Center is open Monday through Friday, from 6:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. For more information, please call 718-206-6102.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Liver Cirrhosis: Symptoms and Treatment

Cirrhosis is a slowly progressing disease in which healthy liver tissue is replaced with scar tissue, eventually preventing the liver from functioning properly. The scar tissue blocks the flow of blood through the liver and slows the processing of nutrients, hormones, drugs, and naturally produced toxins. It also slows the production of proteins and other substances made by the liver. According to the National Institutes of Health, cirrhosis is the twelfth leading cause of death by disease.

The symptoms of cirrhosis of the liver vary with the stage of the illness. In the beginning stages, there may not be any symptoms. As the disease worsens, symptoms may include:

  • Loss of appetite
  • Lack of energy (fatigue), which may be debilitating
  • Weight loss or sudden weight gain
  • Bruises
  • Yellowing of skin or the whites of eyes (jaundice)
  • Itchy skin
  • Fluid retention (edema) and swelling in the ankles, legs, and abdomen (often an early sign)
  • A brownish or orange tint to the urine
  • Light colored stools
  • Confusion, disorientation, personality changes
  • Blood in the stool
  • Fever

Cirrhosis of the liver can be diagnosed through a physical exam, blood tests, biopsy and surgery. During a physical exam, your doctor can observe changes in how your liver feels or how large it is (a cirrhotic liver is bumpy and irregular instead of smooth). If your doctor suspects cirrhosis, you will be given blood tests to find out if liver disease is present. In some cases, cirrhosis is diagnosed during surgery when the doctor is able to see the entire liver. The liver also can be inspected through a laparoscope, a viewing device that is inserted through a tiny incision in the abdomen.

Although there is no cure for cirrhosis of the liver, there are treatments available that can stop or delay its progress, minimize the damage to liver cells, and reduce complications. For cirrhosis caused by alcohol abuse, the person must stop drinking alcohol to halt the progression of cirrhosis. Medications may be given to control the symptoms of cirrhosis. Liver transplantation may be needed for some people with severe cirrhosis.

If you are experiencing any symptoms of liver cirrhosis schedule an appointment with your doctor immediately. The Department of Gastroenterology at Jamaica Hospital specializes in the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders. To schedule an appointment, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.