The MediSys Health Network Recognizes The Accomplishments Dr. Sabiha Raoof During Women’s History Month

March is Women’s History Month.  In recognition of this special observance, the MediSys Health Network would like to honor a woman who is very important to Jamaica Hospital Medical Center and Flushing Hospital Medical Center, Dr. Sabiha Raoof.

Dr. Raoof began her career at MediSys as an attending physician in 1997 after completing her radiology fellowship training. According to Dr. Raoof, “I was young and full of energy, but I was also a mother of two young children, and that aspect of my life has always been very important to me. Working for MediSys allowed me to maintain a balance between my professional goals and my role as a mother.  I never had to compromise my priorities and that gave me the opportunity to grow and thrive professionally. “

After working for a few years as an attending physician, Dr. Raoof was appointed as the Chairperson of Radiology at Jamaica Hospital in 2000 and then at Flushing Hospital in 2001.  Dr. Raoof added “I am so happy that I was given the opportunity to build the department and I am so proud of what we have been able to achieve together.” Under her guidance, the Radiology Departments at both hospitals have earned the Diagnostic Centers of Excellence designation from the American College of Radiology.

Through the years, Dr. Raoof has taken on many additional roles in the healthcare industry that has brought a great deal of positive visibility to the network.  She currently serves as the Vice Chair for the American College of Radiology’s Quality Experience Committee and is a member of their Commission on Clinical Decision Support. She has also been working with CMS for the last four years, initially serving as a national faculty member for the Transforming Clinical Practices Initiative and now serves as one of the Clinical Champions for the Quality Payment Program.

Providing the highest quality care to our patients has always been a major focus for Dr. Raoof, so when she was appointed as the Chief Medical Officer for MediSys in 2017, her main goal was to use the position to improve the quality of care throughout the organization and to do so in a patient and family centered approach to keep patient safety in focus. AS CMO, she has been the driving force behind many initiatives designed to improve the patient experience.

 While Dr. Raoof appreciates the opportunities she has been given in the MediSys Health Network, she realizes that many other women are not as fortunate. “Even today, we have under-representation of female physicians in leadership positions in the healthcare industry. I feel lucky to work for this organization and I commend our administration for being so forward thinking and allowing the most qualified people to progress to leadership roles throughout the organization without any bias against gender, culture, religion or ethnicity.”

Women’s History Month is very important to Dr. Raoof. It not only allows her to thank the many women in her personal and professional life who have supported and been an inspiration to her, but it also serves as an opportunity for her to encourage her female colleagues to step up and be willing to lead.  According to Dr. Raoof, “Women’s History Month is a time to celebrate the tireless half of our population. Women are our future leaders, innovators, and peace-makers. This is a month to celebrate our progress in the face of historic challenge and to dream of our future. “

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Citrus Marinated Salmon with Couscous and Sauteed Haricot Verts

March is National Nutrition Month.  Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Department of Nutrition is marking the occasion with a healthy and tasty receipe for Citrus Marinated Salmon with Couscous and Sauteed Haricot Verts.

This receipe serves four (4)

We would like to thank our

INGREDIENTS:

Fish

Marinade:

3 Tablespoon Orange Juice

1 Tablespoon lemon juice

1.5 Tablespoon minced garlic

1 Teaspoon canola oil

Salt and pepper to taste

4- 4 oz Salmon filets

Haricot Verts- French Green beans

1 lb green beans, French, fresh

1 Tablespoon canola oil

3 cloves garlic, peeled, minced

Kosher salt to taste

Couscous:

Prepare according to package

PREPARATION:

To prepare fish:

  1. Combine marinade ingredients bowl, place salmon in marinade
  2. Heat canola oil in sautee pan over high heat
  3. Remove fish from marinade and discard excess marinade
  4. Place fish in hot pan, Flesh side down, cook for 4-5 minutes, flip fish to skin side, cover pan and cook 4 additional minutes or until cooked through and fish is flakey

To prepare green beans

If using fresh green beans – follow steps below. If using frozen – skip to step 5

  1. Trim ends of green beans
  2. Bring pot of water to boil, blanch green beans for 1-2 minutes in boiling water
  3. Shock green beans in ice bath
  4. Drain green beans
  5. Heat oil in sauté pan over medium high heat
  6. Add minced garlic, sauté 30 seconds until fragrant
  7. Add green beans and sauté for 1 minute or until evenly coated and heated through. (if using frozen green beans, will need more time to cook through)
  8. Season with kosher salt to taste

To prepare the couscous

  1. Cook couscous according to the package directions

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Poison Prevention Week- Child Safety Tips

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Sleep Awareness Week

The keys to a healthy lifestyle are eating right, exercise, and what’s the third thing?  Oh yes, sleep. While we give a great deal of attention to the first two, the importance of a good night’s sleep is often overlooked.

Serene woman sleeping at night

March 10th through the 16th  has been designated Sleep Awareness Week and Jamaica Hospital Medical Center and the National Sleep Foundation (NSF) want to raise awareness and educate the community about how important sleep is to each and every one of us. While most of us understand the importance of getting a good night’s sleep, we often do not make sleep a priority.

There are many health benefits that sleep can provide. Sleep aids our heart, brain, lungs, and muscles to function properly.  Additional benefits include:

  • Improved immunity
  • Decreased pain
  • Increased alertness
  • Lower risk of injury
  • Improved memory
  • Better mood

The NSF recommends that adults receive seven to nine hours of sleep each night. They also provide the following tips to ensure a restful night’s sleep.

  • Stick to a sleep schedule of the same bedtime and wake up time, even on the weekends.
  • Practice a relaxing bedtime ritual Try to separate your sleep time from activities that can cause excitement, stress or anxiety; a lot of which can make it more difficult to fall asleep.
  • If you have trouble sleeping, avoid naps, especially in the afternoon. Napping may help you during the daybut it can interfere with your ability to sleep at night
  • Avoid drinking any caffeinated beverages at least five to six hours before bed.
  • Exercise dailyVigorous exercise is best, but even light exercise is better than no activity.
  • Evaluate your sleep environmentRemove any noisy distractions, eliminate bright lights and set a comfortable temperature to optimize your sleep.
  • Sleep on a comfortable mattress and  Make sure your mattress is supportive.

If you still have trouble falling asleep or getting a restful night’s sleep, you should speak with your doctor as there may be an underlining medical issue. Jamaica Hospital operates a state-of-the-art sleep center that can help diagnose and treat a variety of sleep disorders. For more information, or to make an appointment, please call 718-206-5916.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

March is National Nutrition Month

March has been designated as National Nutrition Month –  an annual nutrition, education and information campaign that focuses on the importance of making informed food choices and developing sound eating and physical activity habits.  In honor of this special observance, Jamaica Hospital would like to share with our community the important role our Registered Dieticians (RDs) play in helping our patients meet their nutritional goals.

What is a Registered Dietitian?

A Registered Dietitian is a trained nutrition professional who has met the strict educational and experiential standards set forth by the Commission on Dietetic Registration of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

They  can be employed in a variety of areas including hospitals, outpatient clinics, corporate wellness programs, food service operations, universities, research, or private practice, just to name a few.

RDs advise and counsel others on food and nutrition. They explain nutrition issues to their patients, develop meal plans for them and measure the effects of those plans.

To become an RD, you must:

  • Complete a Bachelor’s degree with coursework approved by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Complete a 1200 hour dietetic internship which is an accredited, supervised practice program at a health care facility, community program or a food service corporation
  • Pass a national registration exam
  • Complete continuing professional education credits.

At Jamaica Hospital, dietitians are available for the following services: nutrition assessment, diet instruction, recommendations for enteral and parenteral support, staff in-service, food and drug interactions, and nutrition counseling in the outpatient setting.

Jamaica Hospital would like to thank our Registered Dieticians for the very important job they do every day. Their hard work help our patients and community live a much healthier lifestyle.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

National Organ Donor Day

There are currently over 120,000 people in the United States who are awaiting an organ donation that could potentially save their lives.

It all started in 1998 when the Saturn company joined together with the United Auto Workers and supported by the U.S. Department of Health to recognize the need. Every year February 14th is a day designated as National Organ Donor Day that serves to make the public aware of the importance of how an organ donation can save a life for someone else.

There are different types of donations:
• Organs
• Tissue
• Marrow
• Platelets
• Blood

Jamaica Hospital Medical Center supports organ donation. To find out how you can register to become an organ donor, go to www.liveonny.org  for more information.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

January is National Glaucoma Awareness Month

Glaucoma is a group of eye diseases that mainly affects people who are middle-aged or older, but it can affect anyone at any age. There are more than three million people in the United States and 60 million people worldwide who suffer from glaucoma.
Glaucoma is the second leading cause of blindness.Typically the disease starts to develop suddenly, often without symptoms,  and once vision is lost, it is permanent. As much as 40 percent of vision can be lost before some people even notice a problem. It usually starts with loss of peripheral vision.Glaucoma is caused by damage to the optic nerve so that the brain isn’t able to receive images from the eyes. There are two types of Glaucoma, Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma where pressure inside the eye increases on its own and damages the optic nerve and Secondary Glaucoma where another disease causes the pressure in the eye to increase and that results in optic nerve damage. Both types will eventually lead to blindness.

Early detection of Glaucoma can help to slow down the progression of the disease. Regular eye exams are very important. To schedule an appointment with an eye doctor at Flushing Hospital, please call 718-206-5900.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

January is National Birth Defects Prevention Month.

January is National Birth Defects Prevention Month. Jamaica Hospital would like to join the national effort to increase awareness about birth defects and what can cause them.

While not all birth defects are preventable, there are certain healthy behaviors that can be practiced to increase your chances of having a healthy baby.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends the following tips for preventing birth defects:

  • Take 400 micrograms of folic acid every day. Folic acid is important because it can help prevent some major birth defects of the baby’s brain and spine. Most vitamins contain the recommended amount of folic acid, but women should check the label to be sure it contains 100% of the daily value (DV) of folic acid.
  • Speak with your healthcare provider before you begin or stop taking any medicine. If you are planning to become pregnant, discuss your current medicines with a healthcare provider, such as your doctor or pharmacist. Creating a treatment plan for your health condition before you are pregnant can help keep you and your developing baby healthy.
  • Remain up to date with all vaccines, including your flu shot. Vaccines help protect you and your developing baby against serious diseases. Get a flu shot and whooping cough vaccine (also called Tdap) during each pregnancy to help protect yourself and your baby.
  • Attempt to reach a healthy weight before getting pregnant. Obesity increases the risk for several serious birth defects and other pregnancy complications. If you are overweight (or underweight), speak with your healthcare provider about ways to maintain a healthy weight before you become pregnant.
  • Avoid harmful substances, such as alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs during pregnancy. Smoking during pregnancy can harm the developing baby and can cause certain birth defects. Alcohol can also cause problems for a developing baby throughout pregnancy. Using certain drugs during pregnancy can cause health problems for a woman and her developing baby.

By following these recommended tips, you will be doing what is best for you and your baby.

Speak to your doctor about other ways to increase your chances of having a healthy baby. To make an appointment at Jamaica Hospital’s Women’s Health Center, please call 718- 291-3276.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

November is Bladder Health Awareness Month

November has been recognized as Bladder Health Awareness month, to serve as a reminder to get the facts about common bladder health problems and to encourage patients to take an active role in their bladder health.

There are many conditions that can affect the bladder one of the most common is urinary incontinence. Urinary incontinence is the involuntary loss or leakage of urine. According to the American Urological Association, about 1 out of 2 women and 1 out of 4 men suffer from some type of urinary incontinence.

Urge incontinence also known as overactive bladder and stress incontinence are the two most common forms of this health issue. Urge urinary incontinence is when urine leakage occurs with the sudden and strong desire to urinate.  Stress urinary incontinence is when urine leakage occurs with physical activity such as laughing, sneezing, lifting or exercise. There are instances in which both urge and stress incontinence symptoms occur; this is known as mixed incontinence.

Depending on the type of urinary incontinence, extent of symptoms and treatment goals there may be one or more treatment options.

Treatment options include:

  • Physical therapy
  • Oral Medications
  • Vaginal Devices (pessaries,  incontinence inserts)
  • Bladder Botox
  • Surgery

There are a few things you can do to prevent common bladder health problems. Here are a few helpful health bladder tips.

  • Manage daily fluid intake and reduce bladder irritants like caffeinated beverages and alcohol
  • Limit or avoid very spicy and acidic foods that can bother the bladder
  • Stop Smoking
  • Stay active exercise regularly and don’t forget to keep your pelvic floor muscles strong with kegels
  • Try to maintain a normal weight, excess weight gain can increase your risk of developing urinary incontinence

If fear of leaking urine stops you from doing things you enjoy, it may be time to consider treatment. Here at Jamaica Hospital we have providers who specialize in the treatment of bladder control issues.  To learn more about treatment options for urinary incontinence or to schedule an appointment with one of our Urogynecologist, please call 718-206-7001.

Renee Rolston MD-OB/GYN

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

October is Home Eye Safety Month

October is recognized as Home Eye Safety Month to bring awareness of all of the hazards that can be found in the home and provide information on ways to prevent eye related injuries.  Statistics show that almost half of the accidents that involve the eyes occur within the home. It is estimated that over 125,000 eye injuries occur in the home annually and are due to improper use of household products.

Some of the ways eye injuries in and around the home can be prevented include:

  • Wearing safety goggles when using hazardous chemicals
  • Ensuring that areas are well lit
  • Keeping paints, pesticides, fertilizers and other chemicals in a secure location
  • Making sure that children’s toys don’t have sharp edges.
  • Keeping scissors, paper clips, knives, coat hangers, pens and pencils out of reach of small children
  • Checking to make sure that there are no objects with sharp points left in places children can reach
  • Playing with fireworks should be avoided by everyone but especially young children

If an eye injury occurs, it is important to seek medical care immediately. Do not rub, touch or apply pressure to the eye. Never apply ointments or medication to the eye without being told to by a physician. If a chemical gets into the eye, begin flushing it out with water right away. Foreign objects in the eye should only be removed by a trained professional.

If an injury occurs to the eye, seek medical attention immediately by calling 911 or going to the closest emergency room. Your sight is very important and a little precaution can go a long way to making sure nothing happens to cause you to lose it.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.