Types and Stages Of Lung Cancer

Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC) are the two major types of lung cancer. About 80 to 85% of diagnosed cases of the disease are attributed to NSCLC and the remaining 10 to 15% to SCLC.

Once diagnosed, a doctor will try to determine how much cancer has spread; this process is known as staging.  Different stages of the disease describe how much cancer is in the body and can help doctors to decide on suitable treatment options.

The staging system most commonly used for NSCLC is the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) TNM system.  There are four stages which include:

Stage 1- Cancer is found only in the lungs and has not spread to lymph nodes.

Stage 2 – Cancer is found in the lungs and surrounding lymph nodes.

Stage 3- Cancer is found in the lungs, lymph nodes, and in the middle of the chest.

Stage 4- Cancer is found in the lungs, fluid in the area around the lungs, as well as other parts of the body and other organs.

The stages of SCLC are based on the results of biopsies, physical exams, imaging tests or any additional form of testing used to determine how far this type of cancer has advanced. Doctors typically use a two-stage system to help them to decide which form of treatment is best.  The stages of SCLC are:

Limited Stage- This is when cancer is found in only one side of the chest and in the lymph nodes above the collarbone – on the same side of the chest.

Extensive Stage- This describes when cancer has spread to lungs, the lymph nodes and other parts of the body.

Treatment for each type of lung cancer varies by stage.   Typical approaches for NSCLC may include surgery, radiation, immunotherapy or chemotherapy.  Radiation or chemotherapy are the most common types of treatment used for patients diagnosed with SCLC.

Smoking cigarettes or other tobacco products contribute greatly to the development of lung cancer. Quitting smoking can reduce your risk of developing this deadly disease.

If you are ready to quit smoking, Jamaica Hospital Medical Center provides a free smoking cessation program. To learn about our Freedom From Smoking program please call, 718-206-8494 or visit www.JamaicaHospital.org.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Now That You’ve Quit Smoking –How Do You Resist Temptation?

Congratulations, you have quit smoking.  You have accomplished a major milestone in your journey to achieving good health.  A challenge you may face after your Quit Day is remaining tobacco-free by resisting the temptation to smoke again. Coping with tobacco cravings can be difficult; however, by applying the following tips you can decrease the urge to smoke:

  • Remove yourself from situations that may trigger the urge to smoke
  • Spend free time in environments where smoking is not allowed
  • Reduce alcohol consumption
  • Create or join a support group
  • Think about how harmful tobacco is to your health
  • Think about the health benefits you will gain by remaining smoke-free
  • Try nicotine replacements such as gum, patches or prescription medications
  • Do not have just one cigarette to satisfy a craving- one cigarette will make you want more
  • If you miss the feeling of having a cigarette in your mouth try a toothpick, a stick of gum, celery -anything besides a cigarette
  • Exercise
  • Practice relaxation techniques
  • Give yourself credit for each day you are tobacco free
  • Envision being tobacco-free long-term

Quitting smoking and remaining smoke-free can be difficult and requires a life-long commitment but the benefits to your health are immeasurable.

Jamaica  Hospital Medical Center offers a Freedom from Smoking Tobacco Cessation Program to help you overcome your addiction to tobacco and enjoy the benefits of better health in a fun and interactive environment. Receive personalized attention as well as the support from group members who are experiencing this journey with you. For more information, please call 718-206-8494.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

The Effects of Smoking on the Skin

Everyone knows that smoking is bad for your health. The skin is one area that smoking has a very noticeable effect and can be seen very easily.
There are thousands of chemicals in tobacco smoke. Some of these can affect the skin’s elasticity which will lead to wrinkles and skin that looks baggy. Smoke also affects oxygenation of the blood which can lead to a change in skin tone and pallor.
Some other effects smoking can have on skin include:
• Psoriasis
• Hair thinning
• Yellow fingers
• Slower wound healing
• Cancerous skin lesions
Quitting smoking can reverse some of the negative effects. This is due to better oxygenation of the blood and also removal of the toxic chemicals from the body.
If you smoke and would like to quit, you can speak to your doctor and see what method would be best for you. Jamaica Hospital provides extensive assistance for people willing to quit smoking.  We offer a free smoking support group every Wednesday, and there is also the availability of one on one sessions, both in person or by phone. More information is available at 718-206-8494.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

The Dangers of Thirdhand Smoke

Much has been written about the effects that smoking and secondhand smoke have on people’s health. Recently, attention has been given to another dangerous byproduct of smoking, it is called thirdhand smoke.  This is the phenomenon where nicotine and other chemicals found in cigarette smoke lingers in carpeting, clothing, furniture, bedding, wall, cars, and any place where people have smoked a cigarette. It doesn’t go away easily. Some suggest coming into contact with thirdhand smoke residue can lead to serious health issues, similar to those associated with second hand smoke .
The effects of thirdhand smoke can include difficulty with breathing, coughing, and potentially many of the other complications that can come from smoking a cigarette.Children are more susceptible than adults to thirdhand smoke because they come in to contact with more surfaces within a home during a typical day. They play on the floor, they run their hands across table tops, and they are more likely to touch surfaces that are hard to clean.
Thirdhand smoke is difficult to remove from an indoor area. Simple cleaning is often not effective. The best way to avoid thirdhand smoke is to maintain a smoke free environment. There are no benefits to smoking only bad effects and it is important for people who smoke to realize that they are not only harming themselves, but also those who they share space with.
If you would like to stop smoking, please contact one of the counselors at Jamaica Hospital at 718-206-8494 who will assist you.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Want to Quit Smoking? We Can Help!

Smoking Cessation

Tobacco is the single greatest cause of multiple diseases and premature deaths in the USA today.  It kills more Americans each year than alcohol, crack, heroin, homicide, suicide, car accidents, fire and AIDS combined. There are an estimated 480,000 deaths in the United States annually that are due to tobacco use. It is the only legal consumer product that is lethal when used exactly as recommended by the manufacturer.

Smoking cigarettes affects many aspects of health. Tobacco smoke contains about 7000 chemicals, including low concentrations of such strong poisons as ammonia, cyanide, arsenic and formaldehyde.  It also contains 69 carcinogens – substances that are known to cause cancers in humans. Direct association has been established between smoking and cancers of the lung, mouth, nose, throat, larynx, esophagus, colon and rectum, stomach, pancreas, cervix, bladder, kidney and blood.
In the United States, Illnesses caused by smoking cost more than 300 billion dollars per year in direct medical care and lost productivity. Smokers pay twice as much for life insurance and will die on average of 13-14 years earlier than non-smokers. It costs tobacco companies approximately 5 cents to produce a pack of cigarettes.

Many lung conditions are either caused or aggravated by cigarette smoke. It irritates bronchial airways and stimulates mucous production leading eventually to decreased elasticity and functional failure. Patients suffering from COPD, Asthma, Chronic Bronchitis or Emphysema have a much higher risk of dying when repeatedly exposed to smoke.
Smokers are also at greater risk for cardiovascular disease. Smoking damages blood vessels making them stiff and narrow, obstructing blood flow which results with elevated blood pressure, heart attacks, strokes, kidney failure or chronic skin changes.

Pregnant women exposed to tobacco smoke have increased risk of complications like miscarriage, premature birth, and brain and lung damage in developing baby. Sudden infant death syndrome is three times more likely if mother smoked during pregnancy.
Secondhand smoke is the smoke exhaled by smokers or given off by a burning cigarette or pipe. Inhaling secondhand smoke is as hazardous as smoking a cigarette. There is no safe level for secondhand smoke exposure established. People can inhale it at work, homes, cars or public spaces and have all the complications mentioned above.

Smoking tobacco is an addiction similar to heroin and cocaine. It can be successfully treated but the majority of cases require three or more attempts. Quitting smoking offers a chance of feeling better and living longer.  Studies have shown that five, common sense steps, provide the best chance for quitting smoking for good:

1. Get ready: set a quit date and throw out all cigarettes and ashtrays from your home.

2. Get support: tell your family, friends and doctor about quitting plans; search the internet for advice.

3.  Learn new behaviors: distract yourself from the urge to smoke; exercise or go for a walk.

4. Get medication: combining medication like nicotine patches or Zyban with behavioral adaptation and family support quadruples your chances of success.

5. Be prepared for relapse and difficult situations- most people try to quit a few times before   succeeding.

If you would like to learn more about quitting smoking, please call 718-206-8494.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Are Social Smokers “Real Smokers?”

Today, May 31, 2017, is World No Tobacco Day. On this day, the World Health Organization (WHO) asks that healthcare providers highlight the negative effects that smoking can have on a person’s health. This year’s theme is “Tobacco – a threat to development.”

Jamaica Hospital Medical Center would like to participate in World No Tobacco Day by addressing the myth that “social smoking” is not hazardous to your health.

Myth: People who are light or occasional smokers have less of a risk for developing diseases.

Truth: People within this group are usually in denial of the frequency of their use of cigarettes and believe that they are not at risk of developing tobacco-related illnesses.

  • Research has found that one third of people who classify themselves as social smokers actually smoke more than six times per day
  • Smoking a lot or a little, increases the risk for developing diseases caused by tobacco
  • The damage of one puff of nicotine is instant. It takes 10 seconds for nicotine to be transported throughout the body and to the brain. It slows down circulation and increases blood pressure and heart rate
  • A study conducted by the Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education, found that “light” smoking may result in several health complications such as stroke, COPD, peripheral artery disease, lower respiratory tract infections, weakened immune systems Smoking occasionally or socially does not exclude you from developing the health complications associated with tobacco use. Over time smoking will take its toll on your body. The best thing you can do for your health is quit smoking.

If you or someone you know needs help in quitting smoking please contact Jamaica Hospital’s Freedom From Smoking program at 718 206-8494 or visit www.smokefree.gov for more information.

 

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Smoking and Dental Care

cigarettesandteethpicWith smoking, we tend to focus on the effects it may have on the lungs or the heart. However, we don’t focus on the health effects it may have on other parts of the body including your oral health.

The American Cancer Society states that smokers are six times more likely than non-smokers to develop cancers of the mouth, lips, tongue, and throat. In addition, smoking can cause many serious problems for teeth and oral structures. It can interfere with the normal function of gum tissue cells; this can make smokers more susceptible to infections, gum disease, or even periodontal disease. The problem can be further exacerbated when proper dental health care is not followed. The excess of harmful chemicals in cigarette smoke makes smokers twice more likely to suffer tooth loss than non-smokers.

Keep your winning smile and kick the smoking habit. For help to quit smoking, please contact Jamaica Hospital’s smoking cessation support group at 718-206-8494.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Electronic Cigarettes – Are They Safe ?

girn in cafe with E-Cigarette

girn in cafe with E-Cigarette

Electronic cigarettes, or as they are more popularly called, e-cigarettes, are designed to look like traditional tobacco cigarettes. Though the e-cigarettes contain no tobacco, they can be harmful because they contain nicotine which is a cancer causing chemical.
Their manufacturers would like the public to believe that they are a safer alternative to cigarettes, but this may not be the case.

How they work – The user inhales through a mouthpiece similar to traditional cigarettes. This flow of air triggers a sensor that turns on a small battery operated heater. The heater warms up a capsule that contains nicotine and propylene glycol. The vapor that is created gives the user the sensation of smoking a traditional cigarette. The vapor from these e-cigarettes also contains formaldehyde and acetaldehyde which can also cause cancer.

The U. S. Food and Drug Administration has done a preliminary analysis of these devices and concluded that the vapors that they emit contain other carcinogens, such as  nitrosamines and diethylene glycol. It is presumed that the effects of smoking these e-cigarettes would have similar second hand effects as regular tobacco products and their use should be regulated in a similar manner.

Though they have been marketed as an aid to stop smoking for those trying to quit, there is no evidence that proves that these e-cigarettes accomplish that goal.. If you smoke, or know someone who does, and are interested in quitting we recommend speaking with your physician. You can also schedule an appointment with one of our pulmonary specialists at 718-206-6742 who can assist you.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Cancers besides Lung Cancer Linked to Smoking

Cancer

Studies have found that tobacco use is responsible for 30 percent of all cancer deaths in the United States.

It is common knowledge that lung cancer is one of the leading causes of death among smokers; however, smoking tobacco is also linked to the development of other life-threatening forms of the disease.    Besides lung cancer, tobacco smoke also increases the risk for cancers of the pancreas, esophagus, throat, kidney, mouth and cervix to develop.

It is more likely for cancer to spread throughout the body of a smoker than a non–smoker because:

  1. The toxins found in cigarettes weaken the immune system, making it difficult for the body to fight cancer cells and prevent them from growing.
  2. These poisons can alter or damage the DNA of cells. When a cell’s DNA is damaged, it is not able to function properly and can begin to grow out of control.

A smoker can reduce their risk of developing cancer simply by quitting.  Research indicates that within five years of quitting, a person can lower their risk of getting cancer of the bladder, esophagus, and throat by as much as 50 percent.  After ten years of quitting the risk of dying from lung cancer can also be reduced by half.

The journey to quit smoking can be difficult, but you do not have to do it alone. Jamaica Hospital’s smoking cessation team wants to help you develop a plan leading to your “quit day”.  Our hospital has partnered with the American Lung Association to bring you Freedom from Smoking, a comprehensive and successful group-based smoking cessation program, for more information call 718-206-8494.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

How smoking affects nutrition

Smoking plays a large role in the body’s ability to absorb and process nutrients. The nicotine in cigarettes is a potent chemical that negatively affects the systems of the body and how they function. One of the functions that nicotine affects is the body’s ability to maintain the proper level of nutrients.
Vitamin and mineral absorption is also diminished by nicotine, and is more likely to be drained from stores within the body. Vitamin C which the body needs to prevent organ damage is depleted when nicotine is present. People who smoke also tend to have a higher incidence of osteoporosis because less vitamin D absorption leads to less calcium available to strengthen bones.
Nicotine suppresses a person’s appetite by interacting with the brain and central nervous system. One of the ways it occurs is by altering the way we detect flavor.
Quitting smoking will help to restore the body to a better nutritional status. Until a person is able to stop smoking completely, it is a good idea to add fruits and vegetables to the diet. This will help the body by making more minerals and vitamins available to be absorbed. Jamaica Hospital offers a program to help people who are interested in quitting. To learn more, please call 718-206-8494.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.