TENDONITIS

Tendonitis is an inflammation or irritation of the thick cord (tendon) that attaches you bone to muscle.

This condition occurs when an area is repeatedly injured by impact. There are various activities that can cause tendonitis.  Some of the more common causes include:

  • Gardening
  • Manual Labor
  • Golfing and Tennis
  • Skiing
  • Throwing

Often times, the injury is due to a lack of conditioning, such as stretching, before exercise or playing sports.

Some other reasons for Tendonitis may be medical.  It can be brought on by the strain of rheumatoid arthritis, gout, psoriatic arthritis and thyroid disorders.

Tendonitis usually occurs anywhere in the body where a tendon connects to a muscle such as the shoulder, hip, knee, elbow, Achilles tendon or at the base of the thumb.

The good news is, you can prevent tendonitis from happening.  If you are starting an exercise regimen, you should gradually build up to a comfortable level.  This will help your body strength grow with your exercise level.

If you are experiencing pain in your tendons or joints and would like to make an appointment to see a doctor at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-7001 for an appointment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Rotator Cuff Injury

The rotator cuff is a group of four muscles and tendons that keep your arm in the shoulder socket.  Damage or injury caused to the rotator cuff can result in limited mobility or permanent loss of motion of the shoulder joint.

Rotator cuff injuries are very common; in fact, it is estimated that close to 2 million people living in the United States seek treatment for rotator cuff problems every year.

Injuries occur most often in people who repeatedly perform overhead motions in their daily activities.  However, an injury can also be sustained due to an accident or the degeneration of tendons. These factors put some at risk of injury more than others.  Those who have an increased risk of injury include:

  • Individuals who play certain sports that involve the use of repetitive arm motions such as baseball or tennis
  • Individuals employed in occupations that require the use of constant overhead motion such as a house painting
  • Individuals over the age of 40

Injury to the rotator cuff can range from microscopic tears to large irreparable tears.  According to the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, symptoms can vary depending on the severity of these tears and may include:

  • Pain at rest and at night, particularly if lying on the affected shoulder
  • Pain when lifting and lowering your arm or with specific movements
  • Weakness when lifting or rotating your arm
  • Crepitus or crackling sensation when moving your shoulder in certain positions

If you are experiencing these symptoms, it is recommended that you schedule an appointment to see a doctor as soon as possible.  Prolonging a doctor’s visit can result in more damage.

Your doctor may conduct a physical examination and (or) imaging tests such as x-rays or an MRI to determine if you have received an injury. Treatment for a rotator cuff injury may include rest, physical therapy or surgery.

To schedule an appointment with a doctor at Jamaica Hospital Medical, please call 718-206-6923

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Break Free from Osteoporosis by Learning How to Prevent and Manage the Disease.

Osteoporosis is a disease that weakens the bones, making them more susceptible to breaking. Approximately 10 million Americans have osteoporosis and another 44 million have an increased risk, due to poor bone density. In fact, one in two women and one in four men will break a bone due to osteoporosis in their lifetime.

There are a number of factors that can increase the likelihood that you’ll develop osteoporosis – some are controllable, but others are not. Some of the factors are:

• Gender – Women are much more likely to develop osteoporosis than men.
• Age – The older you get, the greater your risk of osteoporosis.
• Race – You’re at the greatest risk of osteoporosis if you’re white or of Asian descent.
• Family history – Having a parent or sibling with osteoporosis puts you at greater risk.
• Body frame size – Men and women who have small body frames tend to have a higher risk because they may have less bone mass to draw from as they age.
• Hormone levels – Osteoporosis is more common in people who have too much or too little of certain hormones in their bodies.
• Dietary factors – Those with a lower calcium intake or have a history of eating disorders are at an increased risk
• Medications – Long-term use of oral or injectable steroids can interfere with the bone rebuilding process
• Lifestyle – Excessive alcohol consumption and tobacco use can contribute to the weakening of bones.

According to the National Osteoporosis Foundation (NOF), the keys to combatting osteoporosis are diet, exercise, and lifestyle. Recommendations include:

  • Get plenty of calcium and vitamin D in your diet
  • Quit smoking and limit alcohol consumption
  • Participate in weight-bearing and muscle strengthening exercises on a regular basis

A bone density test can be performed to measure the proportion of mineral in your bones. During this painless test, you lie on a padded table as a scanner passes over your body. In most cases, only a few bones are checked — usually in the hip, wrist and spine.

Hormone therapy or medications can be administered to treat osteoporosis, but there are side effects. Please consult your doctor. If you do not have a doctor, Jamaica Hospital has qualified physicians at our Ambulatory Care Center. To make an appointment, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Visiting the Mall Can Improve Your Health!

We all know that regular physical activity is important to our overall health, especially for seniors.

Did you know walking is a great way for older adults to remain active?

Seniors who commit to taking a brisk walk each day may be at a lower risk of:

  • Heart Disease
  • Stroke
  • Type 2 diabetes
  • Breast and colon cancers
  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Insomnia

With the onset of colder months upon us, how can older adults continue their walking routine and remain active?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) suggests that in the colder months, you can utilize indoor malls for your brisk walk.  Malls can be pedestrian friendly, they are climate-controlled, are well lit, have benches for resting, fountains for hydrating, restrooms, as well as security guards and cameras for safety.

For more information on mall walking programs and for other walking resources visit the CDC’s Mall Walking: A program Resource Guide at – https://www.cdc.gov/physicalactivity/downloads/mallwalking-guide.pdf

So get yourself a comfortable pair of walking shoes, hit the mall and improve your health!

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Plantar Fasciitis

Have you ever experienced heel pain when you take those first few steps in the morning? The cause of this discomfort may be due to a tightening of the band of tissue known as the plantar fascia that runs along the bottom of the foot, from the heel to the toes.

When this ligament becomes strained, irritated, inflamed or swollen and causes pain when walking, the condition is known as plantar fasciitis.

Risk factors and causes of plantar fasciitis:

•High foot arches
•Flat feet
•Standing or walking on a hard surface for long periods of time
•Being overweight or obese
•Poor fitting shoes
•Tight Achilles tendons or calf muscles
•Tiny tears in the plantar fascia caused by repetitive straining
A proper diagnosis of plantar fasciitis is made by a physical examination of the foot and obtaining a comprehensive medical history of the patient. An x-ray or an MRI may be needed to see if there is a bone fracture that is causing the problem, also to determine if there is a bone spur present on the bottom of the heel.

Treatment of plantar fasciitis can involve taking an anti-inflammatory medication, physical therapy, stretching exercises, shoe inserts known as orthotics, steroid injections, and ultrasound. In severe cases, a surgical procedure may be necessary to provide relief.

If you would like to schedule an appointment with a podiatrist at Jamaica Hospital to evaluate any foot conditions that may be causing discomfort, please call 718-206-6712.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

What is Scoliosis ?

Scoliosis is a sideways curvature of the backbone (spine ). In the majority of cases,  the cause of this curvature is unknown. In general, girls have a higher risk of developing scoliosis than boys do.However,  there are cases where the curvature is due to a person having muscular dystrophy or cerebral palsy. Other causes of scoliosis include birth defects, heredity, and spinal injuries. Not all abnormal spinal curvatures are considered scoliosis. A non-structural deformity can be due to one leg being longer than the other.
Many cases of scoliosis are considered to be mild and other than the spine having an abnormal sideways curvature, there is little impact on the body’s ability to function properly. In serious, the curvature of the spine may be so severe that it affects the chest cavity and causes problems with lung function.  It may also affect the heart’s ability to function properly.
Symptoms of scoliosis:
• Hips that are uneven
• Uneven shoulders
• Uneven waist
• Back pain
• One shoulder blade that protrudes more than the other
In severe cases the ribs on one side of the body may protrude more than the other side
In order to diagnose scoliosis a physician will perform a physical exam that includes visualizing the patient’s posture, taking a family history, performing a neurological exam to check for muscle weakness, numbness, and abnormal reflexes. A series of x-rays will also be taken to confirm the diagnosis.
Treatment of scoliosis is determined by the severity of the abnormal spinal curvature, the age of the patient, the location of the curvature, and whether or not the curvature is “C” shaped or a “double S “. In many cases no treatment will be required, only careful monitoring to see if the condition worsens over time. In cases that are moderate a brace may be prescribed to prevent the worsening of the condition. Severe cases of scoliosis may require surgical intervention. This procedure involves fusion of two or more vertebrae and the use of either rods, plates and screws to hold the spine in place.
If you think that your child may have an abnormal curvature of the spine, speak with your pediatrician about an evaluation. To schedule an appointment with a pediatrician at Jamaica Hospital, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Back Pain

back pain-653834536Back pain is a common health condition that affects approximately 80% of people living in the United States at some point in their lives.

Although back pain can occur at any age, incidents are more common in people 35 years old and older. This may be due to the degeneration of the bones and discs in our spine over time.

Contributors to back pain can vary by circumstance or by preexisting health conditions such as:

  • Obesity
  • Injury
  • Pregnancy
  • Arthritis
  • Improper lifting
  • Osteoporosis
  • Occupation

Back pain may be caused when there is muscle or ligament strain, bulging or ruptured discs or skeletal irregularities.

Back pain can be mild or severe.  Symptoms may include a stabbing pain, muscle ache, pain that radiates down your leg or limited flexibility.

If these symptoms are continuous or become unbearable, it is advised that you see a doctor as soon as possible.  Your doctor will assess your level of pain, your range in mobility and investigate possible causes for your pain.  He or she may perform X rays, nerve studies, MRI or CT scans, bone scans or blood tests to help diagnose and treat the problem. Treatment may include medication, applying heat or ice compresses, physical therapy or surgery.

Jamaica Hospital Medical Center Center offers an Interventional Pain Management Practice, to schedule an appointment, please call 718-206-7246.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

History of the Hip Replacement

ThinkstockPhotos-516732975One of the most common orthopedic procedures performed today is a total hip replacement (THA) .  This procedure is often suggested for patients who have extensive deterioration of the hip joint and whose quality of life is suffering. It was first developed in 1891 by a German physician, Themistocles Gluck, who described using ivory to replace the femoral heads. Early in the 20th century surgeons experimented with different types of tissues as a way of smoothing out deteriorating articular hip surfaces. Some of these tissues that were used were skin, and pig bladder submucosa.
In 1925 an American surgeon, Marius Smith-Petersen, first used hollowed out glass placed over the femoral head. Later on this same surgeon started to experiment with stainless steel.  In the early 1960’s, Sir John Charmley, an orthopedic surgeon in England, developed a hip replacement that uses three components: a stainless steel femoral head, a polyethylene acetabular socket and acrylic bone cement.  This is considered to be a low friction arthroplasty and is the one most commonly used today.
Today hip replacement surgery is done routinely on tens of thousands of patients a year. It is one of the most commonly performed orthopedic procedures and has greatly improved the quality of life for the patients.
If you would like to schedule an appointment with an orthopedic surgeon at Jamaica Hospital to discuss whether a hip replacement would benefit you, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Arthritis and Exercise

Man Exercising On Stationary Cycle

 

Did you know that if you have arthritis, exercise may benefit your bones, muscles and joints?

Now, that doesn’t mean you have to run a marathon or swim with the intensity of an Olympic competitor.  Low impact exercise can help improve your health and fitness without hurting your joints. These exercises may include raising your arms over head or rolling your shoulders.

In conjunction with a treatment plan, exercise can:

  • Strengthen the muscles around your joints
  • Help you maintain bone strength
  • Give you more energy to get through the day
  • Make it easier to get a good night’s sleep
  • Help you control your weight
  • Improve your balance
  • Enhance your quality of life

Exercises can relieve stiffness and increase your ability to move your joints through their full range of motion.  It is always good to speak with your doctor about fitting exercise into your treatment plan.  The types of exercises that are best for you will depend on your type of arthritis and which joints are affected.

If you have arthritis and would like to explore adding exercise to your treatment plan, you can speak with one of the dozens of trained physicians at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center.  To make an appointment with a physician, call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

How “Annual” Is Your Annual Physical?

HypertesionThinkstockPhotos-477722758A.  Yearly

B. Bi-Yearly

C. When I don’t feel good

D. I don’t do doctors

 

An annual exam is a good way of tracking your health progress.  Some of the benefits are:

  • Primary prevention
  • To identify risk factors for common chronic diseases
  • To detect disease that has no apparent symptoms (secondary prevention)
  • A way for the doctor to counsel people to promote healthy behavior
  • To update clinical data since your last check-up
  • To enhance the relationship betweenyou and your doctor

If you are interested in scheduling an exam, Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center is centrally located and has convenient hours.  Call 718-206-7001 for an appointment.

 

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.